The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Pan de Cea

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La masa's picture
La masa

Pan de Cea

Just wanted to show you the "Pan de Cea" (bread from Cea).


I was born in Galicia, the NW region of Spain.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galicia_(Spain)


(I know the link does not work, this site software does not like parentheses. You'll have to type it by hand).


There is a strong and lively tradition of artisan bread making there, and there are quite a few villages which are famous for their bread.


Galician breads are similar to ciabattas (the dough, not the shape), and the usual flours in those doughs are a locally grown variety of wheat and a small amount of rye.


Cea is a little village in the Galician province of Ourense. However,  the "Pan de Cea" is very different from other Galician breads. Its documented history stretches back to the 13th century.


This site is written in Spanish and Galician, but I think you will enjoy the pictures:


http://www.pandecea.org/enfotos/pandecea/index.html


The menu on the left means:



  • Inicio = home



  • Historia = history



  • Elaboración = ahem... making



  • Reglamento = errr... rules  (it has a Protected Geograpical Indication)



  • Las Fotos = The pics



  • Los hornos = The ovens (but the meaning is actually "The Bakeries", in this context)



  • Contacto = Make your guess!


 


 

LLM777's picture
LLM777

This is beautiful bread! I'm sure the flavor is outstanding.


I was wondering about the scoring; I haven't seen it cut across the middle of the bread that way before. Is it common in that area or is it in other places also? And does it have to be a higher hydration bread to do that without splitting along the sides?

La masa's picture
La masa

The flavour _is_ outstanding :-)


That scoring is not common at all. I don't know of any other bread outside that area with such a big cut.


Here are some pics of a "pan de Cea" from my sister's blog:




LLM777's picture
LLM777

I'm sorry, I can't seem to get the pictures.

La masa's picture
La masa

Sorry, I don't know what happened with the pics. This is the link to them:


http://frangullaspolochan.blogspot.com/2009/09/pan-de-cea.html


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

What a cool looking bread...  Do you know where there is a recipe?

La masa's picture
La masa

Sorry, I could not find a meaningful recipe anywhere.


There is a little explanation (not in English) of the process in the site I linked before .


Briefly, it says that the dough is kneaded for 60 minutes, rested 1 hour, and divided in pieces of 700gr or 1200 gr. Each piece is then kneaded 2 or 3 times with a 30 min rest between kneads. The loaves are then scored and baked for 2 hours in a wood fired stone oven.


I cannot say if this is correct or not, it's just a translation of what is written on that site.


Other than the fact that they are baked in a wood fired stone oven, which is absolutely correct.


The 2 hour baking time could be correct, too, as it's a bread with a thick crust.


 


 


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

From the website and the photos from the blog, I can only guess that the ingredients are:


Flour, water, salt, and mother starter, which is probably some sort of either sourdough or yeasted preferment...  Based on the crumb shot, the hydration may be between 65% to 75%...


Also, the 2 hour baking time seems excessive unless the oven is not blazing hot...

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

I found a recipe:


http://es.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081003083951AASeLmX


El pan de Cea es un pan gallego tradicional cuyo origen se halla en San Cristovo de Cea, comarca de Carballiño. El pan de Cea tiene una historia de más de 700 años, continúa haciéndose de modo tradicional y cuenta con Indicación Geográfica Protegida (IGP).
La harina de trigo gallega que utilizan para hacer este pan es mucho más sabrosa, la masa madre se obtiene de una amasada anterior, agua y sal son el resto de ingredientes, y una cocción en hornos de leña tras los procesos adecuados de amasado y fermentación, hacen de este pan un alimento de gran valor gastronómico y cultural

350 gr de harina
1 taza de harina integral
2 cucharaditas de sal 20 gr de levadura fresca
1 vaso de agua templada
2 cucharadas de aceite de oliva o de manteca de cerdo fundida
2 cucharadas de pipas de girasol

Receta del libro "el gran libro de l pan", de Ingram y Shapter, Ed. Hymsa

Mezclar la levadura con agua.

Mezclar las harinas con la sal. En un cuenco grande, echar las harinas mezcladas,el agua en el centro, el aceite y empezar a amasar. Trabajar vigorosamente, hasta obtener una masa lisa, ponerla en una ensaladera engrasada, cubrirla con plástico y dejarla leudar 90-120 minutos.
Noquear la masa y ponerla sobre una superficie enharinada. Incorporar las semillas amasando bien. Dejar reposar 5 minutos antes de dar forma al pan, haciendo una especie de gorra retorciendo la parte de arriba.
Volver a dejar leudar durante unos 45 minutos y cocer a 220º sobre una piedra refractaria, con un cuenco de agua fría en el horno.


 

La masa's picture
La masa

Yes, I found that recipe too. I said I could not find a _meanignful_ recipe :-)


That recipe calls for oil and sunflower seeds, which are not part of any pan de Cea I'd come across.


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Hmmm...  I was thinking that when I found it...  It seems closer to Pan Gallego...  Anyways, the search goes on...  Lemme know if you find anything different...

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

I'm gonna make one tonight then...  I'll fake the recipe based on what I have seen and get back to you all...

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

So I  made 2...  No pics though...  I don't think there's anything complicated about the dough itself.  I think it's the shaping that is difficult...


I will try again tonight...

LLM777's picture
LLM777

What are you doing specifically that is different? I'm just curious. Thanks. I love the scoring.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

So, here's what I'm gonna do differently.


According to the info from the website, I feel like it's leavened with "pate fermentee".


Amasado: se coloca la harina en la artesa dándole forma semejante a un volcán, para lo cual se vierte en el centro, agua, sal y la masa madre preparada con anterioridad.


So I'm gonna make the dough as follows:


Final dough weight - about 750g.


Scrap Dough


217g AP Flour


152g Water


4g Salt


1/4 tsp instant yeast


Final Dough


All of scrap dough


217g AP flour


152g Water


4g salt


1/4 tsp instant yeast


Night before baking:


Mix scrap dough, let ferment for 2 hours and refrigerate overnight.


Bake day:


Mix all ingredients for final dough, autolyse for 30 minutes covered.


After autolyse, knead dough slowly for 1 hr.


After kneading, cover and let rest for 1 hr or until doubled.


Shape dough into a boule and let rest covered for 15-20 mins.  Repeat 2 more times.


After last shaping, cover and let proof for 30-60 mins on floured couche.


Preheat oven with baking stone to 550F.


When ready to bake, pick dough up, and slash in center perpendicular to the length of dough, and stretch the cut out and squish down the ends.


Place in oven directly on stone, turn down to 450F and bake with steam for 1 1/2 hrs.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Also, I found this:


http://www.pistoynopisto.com/index.php/2006/07/13/pan_de_cea


Es un auténtico placer poder disfrutar de este pan artesanal, cocido en hornos circulares de leña y elaborado exclusivamente con harina de trigo, agua y sal, al que se le añade, para la fermentación, masa madre procedente de una amasada anterior.


"made exclusively of wheat flour, water, salt, and a "mother starter dough" made from before...


I'll take the mother starter dough maybe to be scrap dough, or a sourdough starter...

La masa's picture
La masa

Hi Bassbakingbreadplayer :-)


I think your recipe must be more or less correct. "Masa madre" is just old dough but I don't know which kind. Maybe a mix of sourdough and commercial yeast, as the rules allow for commercial yeast "to help the rising of the dough, in an amount not greater than 3gr per Kg of old dough".


Re the scoring, the baker in this pics http://www.pandecea.org/enfotos/pandecea/images/mini_22.jpg


http://www.pandecea.org/enfotos/pandecea/images/mini_37.jpg


is holding the loaf on her left hand. As it's a big loaf, it hangs down the sides of her hand so the upper part of the loaf gets stretched and opens when scored. Probably, this is important to get that final shape.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

La masa,


Thanks for the info regarding the commercial yeast...  So I guess I can make the "old dough" using a sourdough starter and let that ferment then...  So, depending on the size of recipe, adjust the amount of commercial yeast...  I'm thinking that the old dough amount should be 50% the amount of the final dough weight, and at the same hydration level...


I looked at the pics, and that makes me feel again that the loaf should be shaped as a boule for proofing, and then slashed as the pictures...


I'll make the masa madre tonight, and the final dough tomorrow night and see what I come up with...


Are you gonna attempt to make one too?


Tim

La masa's picture
La masa

I'm a little too busy these days, and have to make a big brioche as a present for a friend in the weekend, so pan de Cea is not a priority for me now. But I'd really love to see a few pics of your attempt at it.

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

I just figured something out...


Reamasadura: cada operación de reamasado, co seu posterior respouso de 25 a 30 minutos denomínase tenda. O proceso de elaboración sofre entre dúas ou tres tendas


This sounds like the "turning the dough" process where you turn the dough out onto a floured surface, stretch, fold, and return to the bowl, cover, and let rest for 25-30 mins, and repeat a few times...

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKxelxz3HJ0


Watch from 0:43 to 0:55.


Notice at 0:45, after it's slashed, she stretches it, puts it down on the peel and squishes down the ends, and then the guy puts it in the oven...


Next at 0:53, the guy takes the peel and places it under the loaf and iifts it up at the center to make a "crack" where the slash is, before the loaf has expanded...


This is what I did not do as I just discovered the video...


Next time i'll try this...  I'll post pics of my attempt in a few days...  For now, I just be happy that I have an edible ciabatta with a horizontal slash in the center...


I feel like such a bread geek!!!

LLM777's picture
LLM777

How is your Pan de Cea coming along, breadbakingbassplayer?

La masa's picture
La masa

Hey breadbakingbassplayer, those few seconds in the video worth its weight in gold!


However, it seems to me a difficult thing to reproduce in my domestic electric oven.


I don't own a baking stone to this day, I use a thick stoneware dish that works great, but its shape and size make it unsuitable for loaf shapes other than boulee.


 

breadbakingbassplayer's picture
breadbakingbass...

Well, the 2nd attempt was a slightly better tasting bread, but I don't think I let it ferment, or proof long enough...  Not sure if I will have time this year to make another attempt, but surely next year I'll try again...


Right now I'm working on sourdough, and having a great, and succesful time doing it...