The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

moving my bread from bowl to parchment

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swathen's picture
swathen

moving my bread from bowl to parchment

HI!  I am wondering if it matters how much my bread is "manioulated" when I move it from bowl to parchment after it's finished with the first round of rising.  This is italian bread that I got the recipe from TFL.  Also when I divide the dough it should it be cut on the granite or torn apart as I have tried to do from the bowl.  Lastly can anyone tell me why I put it into balls then let it sit for 5-10 min. before I form into batards?


 


Thank you for your help all you experts out there.  My family loves this bread and I just want it to be as good and close to the recipe as possible.


Summer


 


 


 


 

janij's picture
janij

I would say for an italian bread you want to degas the dough alittle but not completely when moving to divide and shape.  You want to divide the dough with a dough knife/blade over tearing the dough to divide it.  You want the dough to relax for 5-15 min before final shape so that the gluten relaxes and it will shape better.


If you have not, get a copy of Peter Reinhardt's Bread Bakers Apprentice and read the first 1/3 of the book.  It will talk all about these questions and their answers.  But also ask away here.

swathen's picture
swathen

Thak you for your suggestion of reading Reinhardt's book.  I reciently purchased the book and am now making my way through chapter 2.  I also am awaiting Christmas where I know my daughters have bought me a dough scrapper/cutter.


 


I appreciate your thoughts.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi Summer, 

I'm unsure why you would be moving it to parchment after the bulk fermentation. Once the dough has finished the first rise, you move it from the bowl to your counter (or bread board) which has been lightly floured.  You then divide the dough with a baker's bench knife (also called a dough divider).  Using a scale to make sure it is equally divided is helpful.

Ripping the dough into sections while it's still in the bowl will just tear the gluten.  Not a good thing.   You want to handle the dough gently.

After the dough is divided you preshape it.  The rest period (10-20 minutes) is necessary to allow the dough to relax so it won't snap back like a rubber band when you're trying to form the final shape.  If it resists holding the shape, let it rest a bit more.

The shaped loaves are then proofed (be sure to cover them), scored, and baked. You can do the final proofing on parchment; just use kitchen towels as a makeshift couche. I always proof/retard on parchment since it makes loading the bread into the oven effortless.   

I'm not sure which recipe you're using, but hope this answers your questions.

 

swathen's picture
swathen

Thank you for your response.  I will continue to try to be gentle. When I said I moved it to the parchment, I meant that after it rises, when it's time to divide and then be put on the parchment before I let it rest then form it.  That's when I have to divide it.  I am really not sure how I would weigh it without then cutting some pieces off and adding it to the other.  That isn't ok is it?  Or do I just snip some off and throw it away? 


I am making the rustic bread by Floydm.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

You're right on, Summer.  Let's use rolls as an example.  If I want two-ounce rolls, I'll cut what I think is the correct amount from the dough and put in on my scale.  I'm nearly always wrong so I have to either add or remove a small piece until the scale registers two ounces.


Those added little pieces make no difference because the rolls are going to be preshaped, rested a bit, then shaped.  Since all the rolls are two ounces, I don't have to worry about winding up with one underbaked three ounce roll, or an overbaked 1.25 ounce roll.


Same goes for loaves of bread.


BTW, you don't have to wait until Christmas for a bowl scraper.  Google "bowl scraper" to get an idea of the size and shape, then cut one out from a plastic milk jug.