The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

South tyrolean Farmerbread (Bauernbrot)

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Salome's picture
Salome

South tyrolean Farmerbread (Bauernbrot)

I undigged an old and beloved recipe, which I somehow just didn't bake in the last time. It's a rather simple recipe; I got it from a woman originating from South Tyrol, she calls it her Farmerbread (Bauernbrot). It's a sourdough bread which can be altered fairly much.


This time I used only whole-grain flours, although the recipe originally asks for high extraction flour (partly).


I posted the recipe for the first time here in my very first forum post when I was asked to share some of my favourite recipes.


The recipe below is how I did yesterday.


The resulting bread remains one of my favourites, it has a fully developed flavour, is pleasantly "heavy", moist, somewhat chewy. Perfect for a hearty sandwich, for instance with a strong cheese or ham. My today's sandwich is made with this bread, a bean spread, cucumber and radish slices. Yum!


the lady of South Tyrol told me that she alters the recipe according to what she's got on hand, sometimes she increases the rye percentage, sometimes she makes it completely wheat. She reccomends to add 150 g of walnuts as well, but this amount seems to be fairly little to me. but I've never tried it yet. I could imagine that a toasted seed-soaker (especially sunflower seeds, flaxseeds...) would work outstandingly.


Bauernbrot


(Farmerbread)


------------


(1) "Preferment"
250 g whole grain rye flour
250 ml water
200 g ready to bake sourdough (100% hydration whole grain rye)


(2) final dough
1 kg whole-wheat flour (original: 500 g whole-wheat rye, 500 g high extraction wheat flour)
750 ml lukewarm water
27 g salt
1 tablespoon honey


3 tbs Vital Wheat gluten (can be excluded)


1. Prepare the sourdough (200 g), let it ripe.



2. Mix all the ingredients of (1) in a bowl ("Preferment"), cover it and let it rest for 12 hours on a warm spot.


I'm sure that the "preferment" could be substituted by a normal whole rye sourdough, without this extra step. Just mix 335 g flour, 335 g water and 30 g ripe culture and let it fully ferment. But this must me quite harder to digest for the yeasties, so if you have time it's maybe worth to feed the dough in two steps.



3. mix this "preferement with all the other ingredients of the final dough. Knead the dough for at least 15 minutes (by hand). This time I added vital wheat gluten, but I didn't feel much of a difference compared to my earlier bakes.



4. for the first fermentation: cover the bowl and let the dough ferment until it feels light, it should slightly less than double. This took me around four hours, but be aware that sourdough can differ a lot depending on dough and room temperature! I had the same recipe fully fermenting in two hours in summer.


5.Shaping


for the baking in pans: grease two or three pans ane it with baking paper. (I don't know how big american pans normally are, so just divide into two or three pieces as you feel)


For baking as hearth loaves: Shape like discussed here (ff)



5.  let the loaves rest until they've risen quite a bit (slightly less than doubled, until they feel "light")  watch your dough and judge yourself.


6. preheat your oven as hot as possible (450°F) , steam well, put the breads into the oven and lower the temperature to 420°F, lower the temperature gradually during the rest of the bake, ending at around 390°F. I baked for about 50 minutes.


7. Let cool and let the loaf set over night.


 


 


 



Salome

Comments

rossnroller's picture
rossnroller

Shon! Brings back memories of my stay in Germany in the 80s, which is when I first encountered truly gorgeous bread for the first time. Really looking forward to trying this one.


Cheers
Ross

chouette22's picture
chouette22

... Bauernbrot! Glad to see you back, hands in dough and all. Your courses must have kept you very busy!

Salome's picture
Salome

Hi,


thank you for your friendly comments!


Yes my courses are keeping me busy, but I enjoy it lots. The only downside is as you noticed that my hands aren't as regularly in dough...but still they are, maybe just more on a weekly or half-monthly base. But not every bread is worth a post...


Salome

Postal Grunt's picture
Postal Grunt

Many thanks for the formula. It's going to go up to Omaha, Nebraska on Thursday for my sister-in-law's thanksgiving dinner. I'm looking foward to starting it tomorrow.

Salome's picture
Salome

I wish you a happy Thanksgiving and success with the formula! I hope you and your family will enjoy it.


Salome

Noor13's picture
Noor13

Mmmmmmm I love Bauernbrot. Can't wait until I go back to Austria to get some form there:) Yours look VERY yummy too.