The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Eric Kayser's La Tourte de Meule

  • Pin It
DonD's picture
DonD

Eric Kayser's La Tourte de Meule

Background:


In Eric Kayser's book "100% Pain", the Foreword written by the celebrated French chef Alain Ducasse waxed poetic about Kayser's Tourte de Meule, which literally translates to "Millstone Pie" and which is basically a Country Miche made with High Extraction Organic Stone Ground Flour and a Liquid Levain.


 Eric Kayser's "La Tourte de Meule"


In my last blog, I mentioned that I was able to bring back 3 types of Organic Flour from the "Meunerie Milanaise" in Quebec, the same mill that supplies Daniel Leader's "Bread Alone" bakery in Woodstock, New York. In addition to the basic Type 55 AP Flour, I also bought their Type 70 and Type 90 Organic Stone Ground flours. Having secured the proper ingredients, I decided to give EK's Tourte de Meule a try.


EK's original recipe:


- 700 g T 80 Organic Stone Ground Flour


- 300 g T 65 Organic Stone Ground Flour


- 200 g Liquid Levain


- 2 g Fresh Yeast


- 25 g Sea Salt from Guerande


- 700 g Water


Since my flours have slightly higher extraction, I decided to use half T 90 (83% extraction) and half T 70 (81% extraction) Organic Stone Ground Flour. I also halved the recipe to 500 g total Flour Mix and converted the yeast amount to 1/8 teaspoon Instant Yeast (for 500 g total flour). I used Grey Sea Salt from Guerande and Deer Park Spring Water. My Liquid Levain build was 100% hydration using T 70 Flour.


I modified the procedures slightly from Kayser's instructions. He calls for mixing all the ingredients, fermenting the dough at room temperature for 2-1/2 hours with stretch and fold at 15 minutes and then at 1-1/2 hours, shaping and proofing in banneton for 2 hours before baking.


My Procedures:


- Combine the Flour Mix and Water and autolyse for 30 minutes.


- Add the Liquid Levain, Yeast and Salt and knead with a dough hook on slow speed for 2 minutes.


- Do 10 stretch and fold in the bowl at 45 minutes interval 4 times.


- Ferment the dough at room temperature for 1 hour and retard in the refrigerator for 24 hours.


- Shape the dough into a Boule and let the dough rise in a lined Banneton for 1 hour.


- Bake in preheated 440 degrres F oven for 15 minutes with steam and at 410 degrees F without steam for 30 minutes.


Results:





The loaf had great oven spring. The exterior had a deep amber color and was nice and crusty. The smell was sweet and caramelly. The crumb was open and medium soft with a slight chewiness. The crumb color was beige with fine specks of bran, similar to a whole wheat crumb. The flavor was wheaty, tangy with a touch of acidity. When sliced and toasted, it took on a whole new dimension. The taste of toasty grain came out with an extra dose of sweetness. Overall, I was very pleased with the result.


Don


 


 


 

Comments

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Am guessing it tastes as good as it looks - a real winner, Don.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

And made with the good stuff!


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

Floydm's picture
Floydm

That is great looking.  Well done.

Reuben Morningchilde's picture
Reuben Morningchilde

Colour and structure of the crumb look amazing, Don! Great job.

JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

Perfect Miche! It's very close to the "Max Poilane Miche".


 


I would like to see a detailed crumb photo of your bread.


Giovanni

DonD's picture
DonD

LindyD, Sylvia, David, Floyd, Reuben, Giovani, your nice comments are very much appreciated.


I have updated the write-up with some additional information and added a close-up crumb shot at Giovani's request.


Don

ques2008's picture
ques2008

Very nice.  That organic shop in Quebec makes great flour.  I bought their spelt flour last summer; Loblaws carries it in their organic foods section.


La Meunerie Milanaise has an interesting history, run by a charming couple.  I may want to swing by one of these days.  I'd be curious to see how they make their flour (using their special stones).

DonD's picture
DonD

When I was in Montreal, I called Meunerie Milanaise to try to arrange a visit but they say that being an enterprise manufacturing agricultural products, for health safety reasons, they do not conduct tours for individual customers. However I remember Googleing Meunerie Milanaise and finding a video documentary from Canadian TV about them.


Don

Reuben Morningchilde's picture
Reuben Morningchilde

Dear Don,


I tried my hands at the tourte de meule this weekend, and I am only moderately happy with the results:


 


The crust turned out lovely, with a nice colour and many cracks, I even got a nice oven spring which usually is the weak point of my breads, for whatever reason.


But the crumb wasn't as I had hoped for.



It is sufficiently open, but I had hoped for larger holes, especially after seeing the structure of the dough after retardation. Probably I have destroyed much of the structure during shaping... I think.


Do you actually 'shape' the dough during shaping or do you merely tuck the edges in and drop the whole thing into its banneton?


 Thanks!

JoeVa's picture
JoeVa

I think this is a good crumb, do not be confused by "large holes". Lots of people say I want large hole, large hole (but they have only the so called tunnels) but what we should obtain is a well developed crumb ... and, from what I can see in the photo, you got it! That's a perfect crumb for a high extraction bread.


Giovanni

Reuben Morningchilde's picture
Reuben Morningchilde

Well, thanks! The bread tastes great and has a certain elasticity to the crumb, which I like very much.


So the 'lacking' holes are mostly an optical flaw to me. But it was the image from EK's original book in the post above that made me try this. And compared to that mine looks a little... lame.
(Actually, that's also what my wife thought of the taste. And the rest of the family. I still love it.^^)  

DonD's picture
DonD

The crust looks beautiful. I agree with Giovanni's assessment about the crumb, although not as open, looks soft to me, just like the Kayser's picture. I shaped the boule using the standard method of folding in the edges to create surface tension and rounding out the shape by tucking and rotating the boule on the work surface and dropped it seam side up into the banneton. I was not particularly delicate in the handling. What type of flour did you use and in what percentage? The reason I am asking is the Milanaise flour that I use is quite different in water absorption than most American flours. For example, the dough always seem wetter and more extensible for the same amount of water used with KA flour. That could be the reason that my crumb seems more open.


Don

Reuben Morningchilde's picture
Reuben Morningchilde

Wow, thanks, I really didn't think my bread was up to much. And yes, 'soft' is just the right word to describe the crumb, it is fluffy but tears in strings rather than crumbles.


Well, your shaping method doesn't really sound different from mine. I'll definitely try this bread again, so I'll be able to test some varying degrees of gentleness.


About the flour: I used German whole wheat flours, 700g type 1050 (which has a good balance between taste and gluten extraction) and 300g home milled wholegrain to make up for the stone milled part.
I only had rye based sourdough, so I used that one. So as you can see, I didn't really use comparable flours, but close enough, considering what I can get my hands on here.