The Fresh Loaf

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I want a recipe for something and I don't even know what it is called

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JeremyCherfas's picture
JeremyCherfas

I want a recipe for something and I don't even know what it is called

Strange request, I know, but at a Roman restaurant a while ago we were served savoury bread rolled up like a Chelsea Bun (for the UK) or a Cinnamon bun or raisin Danish (for others). The filling was pieces of prosciutto and semi-dried tomatoes, and the crumb was soft and dense, and probably contained a fair bit of oilve oil. The whole thiing was absolutely delicious. So delicious that I completely forgot to even ask what they were called or how to make them.


I'm sure I could make these, given at least a hint of the type of dough that might have been used.It will be a while before I get the chance to go back to the restaurant and ask.


Any suggestions?


Thanks


Jeremy


 

inlovewbread's picture
inlovewbread

Sounds like a Rosetta roll. Daniel Leader has a formula for them in his book, "Local Breads" on page 226-229. His formula doesn't call for olive oil but I've had them before with olive oil added. Often times they roll things inside like prosciutto, etc. I've also had Pesto Cheese Rosetta Rolls.


See what you think. I hope you have the book, if not....I don't know if you can google the formula or if I'm allowed to post the formula? I don't know how the copyright works on that.. maybe the moderator could answer that question.


Hope this helps!

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

This recipe doesn't mention stuffing(of course, just about any dough can be stuffed), but otherwise seems to be what you're looking for:


http://tumyumtreats.blogspot.com/2008/03/rosettas-rolls.html

ScottHall's picture
ScottHall

Make Foccacia, 5% olive oil - no more than %75 total hydration - mix parmesan cheese and italian spice throughout the dough - right away - sheet it out to 4mm thick and 30 cm wide cover with shredded ham, sundried tomatoes, cheese, roll it up like cinn buns and slice 4-6cm thick buns, place 12 on half sheet pan and proof, bake at 450ish for 12-15 min. - brush with olive oil as soon as they're out, you could even sprinkle with parmesan right before you bake should be good  - ya

ScottHall's picture
ScottHall

Or you could just use croissant dough, sheet it out like cinn buns but thinner then proceed to spread-sprinkle-roll-proof-and-bake - that be good too.


 

JeremyCherfas's picture
JeremyCherfas

Thanks to Scott's encouragement, I just went ahead and did it, and was very pleased with the results. Blogged in full here. Lessons learned would be to use slightly thicker prosciutto next time, and maybe leave out the sun-dried tomatoes. Adding some rosemary leaves might be good too. Other than that, I was pretty pleased with the outcome. 

JeremyCherfas's picture
JeremyCherfas

What I'm looking for definitely is not a rosetta, that's for sure. At least, not a rosetta like the common ones in the shops here (in Rome), which are hard and essentially plain, rather dull bread. That recipe is something altogether different that shares a shape with the ones we buy here, but not much more.


I think Scott Hall is on the right track, it is a kind of focaccia dough, although 5% olive oil seems high to me on the face of it. The crumb was not full of holes; although it was light it was uniform. I'm almost inclined to think that the dough had some milk in it, but I know that is unlikely. Anyway, I'll try a version with a focaccia dough next weekend, and of course I'll report back.


Thanks all.


Jeremy