The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Fresh Yeast Making Breads that has live Yeast smell

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jc's picture
jc

Fresh Yeast Making Breads that has live Yeast smell

I heard the fresh yeast is better taste than the dry active yeast and instant yeast. I baked some milk breads with the fresh yeast two days ago. The milk breads rised very nice however, they have the live yeast smell. I feel it is a strong smell.  Later, I changed to dry active yeast baking the same type of breads. It doesn't have the strong live yeast smell.

Nickisafoodie's picture
Nickisafoodie

JC, best results are using SAF yeast, combined with a sponge that goes overnight.  Better still is using a starter, plus yeast.  SAF doesn't smell like the other yeasts.


 


If you are using one step, yeast, water flour, knead and bake, you will get yeast smell, by going with a two part process using 30% sponge for 6 hours or overnight, then adding rest of ingredients plus 1% yeast by flour weight, you will have good results...

jc's picture
jc

Thanks for your comment Nickisafoodie. I bought the fresh from Surfas. You are right, I was using the one step method (milk, yeast, flour..etc.)->knead->fermented->shaped->baked. When you mentioned 'sponge' - did you use the fresh to make sponge or use sourdough starter to make 'sponge'? If you use the fresh yeast to make 'sponge', do you use all portion of the fresh yeast from recip or do you use 1/2 of the fresh and another 1/2 for dough? Thanks..JC

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Many recipes for bread -- especially those in older books -- recommend twice as much yeast as you need to make the bread.  People often don't want to wait, so yeast quantities in those recipes were selected to satisfy this demand. 


I don't know whether your recipe does that or not, but a strong smell of manufactured yeast often indicates that there's more yeast than you need.


If the "first rise" or bulk fermentation is supposed to be only one hour, then there's a good chance you can use half that much yeast and ferment for two hours.  Or use even less and go longer.  You'll need to experiment, of course, but that might point you toward a solution. 


--Dan DiMuzio

jc's picture
jc

Thanks Dan. I scaled the fresh yeast exactly what it was. I think you were right about the time of bulk fermentation. It took only about one hour to be double in size when it was sitting in the room temperature.

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hey jc,


I didn't consider this until now, but it is at least possible that the fresh yeast you're using has "gone over." 


Is the block of yeast still crumbly (as it should be) or does it smear easily when you try to break it apart?  Did it have spotty discolorations on its surface?


Dan DiMuzio

jc's picture
jc

Dan..I think the yeast was still good. I bought it from Surfas in two days ago before using it. I had made sure the fresh yeast was not sitting too long in the store. One sales associate told me that the yeast was arrived one day. This means the fresh yeast should be less than 1 week old when I used it. I had use fresh yeast to make milk breads before. It didn't have strong smell of fresh yeast. I was thinking whether I substituted brown sugar from the original recipe requried white granulate sugar.