The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Durum wheat

rayel's picture
rayel

Durum wheat

Does anyone know if fine durum wheat flour becomes less yellow when ground really fine? Or can the Durum flour I have purchased have come from a less yellow variety? Also, if Semolina refers to a grind, then what is the difference between finely ground semolina, and finely ground Durum?  I have read that in the U.S. Semolina comes from Durum wheat. Does that mean in other countries Semolina might not come from Durum? I have not used my Durum flour yet, and I am wondering if I can substitute, in recipes calling for fine semolina.Thanks.


Ray

LoganK's picture
LoganK

Durum is the grain, it's a very hard wheat strain, just loaded with protein.  Durum flour and fine semolina (or fancy durum) are the fine grind, the terms seem to be used interchangably.  I use what I buy as durum flour for anything calling for durum or fine semolina.  It can make beautiful, delicious loaves on it's own (like Leader's altamura sourdough loaf) or in combinations (like pugliese in BBA).  Semolina (NOT fine semolina) is the coarser stuff from the durum grain, it feels more sandy or gritty.  It's the stuff that a lot of people use to line peels, bannetons, parchment, etc., and it's used in sardinian flatbreads and in combination with other wheats here and there, I know it's featured in BBA sicilian bread. As for the color, I don't do any milling so I can't say for sure, but I gather that the endosperm carries that nice golden tone.  I use durum flour from a local pasta maker and semolina from Bob's Red Mill, and they're very close in color, as far as I can tell. 


Logan

rayel's picture
rayel

Thanks very much Logan, This information helps me a lot.


Ray

inlovewbread's picture
inlovewbread

I've just been looking into this myself... because I want to know if I can just grind my semolina finer to use it as "durum flour". There's not really a clear consensus out there about this. I'm also looking into growing it myself, we'll see :-) I just know I can't afford KA's $8.50 for 3 lbs! (plus shipping)


I did find out though, to answer part of your question above, that "semolina" refers to the grind, not the wheat. Farina (cream of wheat, etc) are a semolina grind, but in the US they only allow you to use the term semolina when refering to durum wheat that has been milled this way. Other countries use the term for that type of milling on many other types of wheat.


Hope this helps-

rayel's picture
rayel

Thanks so much for your information. Every little bit furthers my understanding. I purchased my Durum flour at a regional market. The price for 10 lbs. was 10.95, and a friend is splitting that amt with me.  5 lbs of it. doesn't seem so daunting. Got a lot of great info from Dan DiMuzio's Artisan Bread Book. Had I bothered to look it up earlier, I would have had most of my questions answered. I also learned that using either Durum or courser Semolina is a bit more chalenging, than using more typical bread flours. Slower water absorbtion, and its intolerance to long mixing, are two that he mentions. He suggested an autolyse as being helpful. I am gathering  as  many ideas through other's recipes, and baking experiences using this flour, as I can before I venture forth. Thanks again, I will share my results soon.


Ray


 


 


 


 

rayel's picture
rayel

Hi inlovewbread, and others. In my previous post i messed up the title of the bread book I had been reading. The book's title is,  bread baking, An Artisan's Perspective. After making the post, i left the computer for Coffee, and thought, oh oh , I think I messed up the title, when I returned and closed the book, & reread the title. Just thought it only fair to correct my error. My apologies to the author first and formost.


Ray