The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

refrigerated rise

metropical's picture
metropical

refrigerated rise

Since many white artisan type recipe do well from refrigerating the rise over time, I wonder if I might get anything from doing the same with my multigrain?


 


Has anyone tried or using refrigeration for the rise, then letting the dough come to room temp before baking?

kutzeh's picture
kutzeh

I actually have an old Robin Hood flour recipe  for white bread that rises in the frig for 2 to 12 hours. Says to take out of frig while heating oven and then bake. Comes out great everytime.


I have also refrigerated the "no knead" bread over nite before adding the last 1/2 c flour and then baked as per recipe ..great again!

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Hi metropical


With a name like that I take it you live somewhere warm! So the fridge is probably a great tool for you to experiment with.


For the purposes of timing I have been putting my sourdough raised multigrains in the fridge overnight. The sourdough takes so long from final mix until the oven, by proofing it in the fridge I don't have to keep an eye on it.


I use a Peter Reinhart method preparing a soaker and the sourdough (as he does with a biga,) the day (evening) before, then the next evening do the final mix and then the fermentation over about four hours, then shape and into the fridge. I have tried a bit of bench proofing before the fridge but it didn't seem to make much difference to the final result with my formula so now it's straight into the fridge after shaping.  I have tried both baking after a couple of hours out of the fridge and straight from the fridge and got pretty similar results. Now I tend to take them out of the fridge when I turn the oven on.


So what about taste. I'm afraid I haven't been able to detect significantly different complexity of flavour from using the fridge for proofing. I think using the soaker and preparing the sourdough a day in advance provides a much bigger contribution to flavour for the formula I am using which is based on Peter Reinhart's transitional straun in his Whole Grain Breads book.  I have really enjoyed experimenting with the various parameters and encourage you to do so too. Let me know what happens when you try a refrigerated rise.

metropical's picture
metropical

no, chilling now here in NY/LI.


I'll try chilling my next dough overnight for proof stage, just to see.


I made a no knead from Jeff & Zoes book the other day.


Flavor was OK.  I was going for ciabtta, our fave white bread.


But the was one long eye along the top of the bread and regular sized eyes thru out.


I've just taken the 2nd half of the dough out and will let it counter a while then start folding a fews times and perhaps a flip on the way to the stone.

metropical's picture
metropical

I fridged the dough in the pan and allowed it to rise over night.


I took the dough out when I lit the oven.  When the oven came to heat (10 mins or so) I put the pan in with the usual steaming water underneath for 10 mins.


Then I removed the steam and let the dough cook til 200ºF.


Nothing significant in flavor or look, but ti's still very good.


Next time I'll let the dough come to room temp or so, I'd guess 2 hours, before baking.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Does using the fridge make it a bit easier to fit the process into your daily routine?


What grain combinations have you been using?


I use about ten different grains as well as wholegrain flour and white flour. I have been swapping one grain at a time each time I make a multigrain and have liked them all! Always include rolled oats and I like the extra moistness when I use cooked rice and the nuttiness when I use quinoa or amaranth (they both need to be cooked first too). Today the soaker has rye flakes in it, first time to try them so I'm wondering what the dough will feel like when I make up the final mix and whether I'll decide to add a bit more water.

metropical's picture
metropical

fridge doesn't change the convenience much.  I was more looking for a better rise without cracks I sometimes get.  And or a different flavor, though the bread is a hit with anyone who has it.


I use bread, ww, rye, oats, quinoa, wheat & rye berries, gluten and 2 cups of Silverton stlye grape starter that I've had for years.


I pre-cook the berries and quinoa.

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

I have been slashing my loaves before putting them in the oven. I have them in tins, and do a single slash. This allows the loaf to expand when I bake straight from the fridge, in a more controlled way. I take them out of the tins and put them on the baking stone for last 10 minutes or so.

metropical's picture
metropical

I slash before they hit the fridge, so basically they're ready for the oven when I pull them out.


Though as I said, next time I think I'll give them a couple hours at room temp post the fridge.

metropical's picture
metropical

did this again.  the rise has been better than my steamed oven rise.


The loaf finished up much nicer ........... so far.


 


http://www.flickr.com/photos/24075712@N00/4173503966/in/set-72157622846267911/


 


dunno why bthe photo doesn't show when I [img] but here's the link anyway.