The Fresh Loaf

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Second breads made with San Francisco Sourdough starter from sourdo.com

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dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Second breads made with San Francisco Sourdough starter from sourdo.com

These breads were made with my recently activated San Francisco Sourdough starter from sourdo.com. I used 100 gms of starter fed with a mix of AP, WW and Rye flours, 500 gms KAF Sir Lancelot flour, 360 gms water, 10 gms salt. The formed loaves were cold retarded for about 14 hours.




The flavor is very nice. It is a little more sour than yesterday's San Joaquin Sourdough, as expected, but still only mildly sour. I'm hoping the distinctive SF SD flavor will develop over a few weeks. Stay tuned.


David

Comments

CarlSF's picture
CarlSF

Hi David,


I am curious to know if the starter that you added to your final dough was a stiff starter or a liquid starter.


 


Carl

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Carl.


I used a 75% hydration starter for this bread. I guess that's somewhere in between "stiff" and "liquid."


BTW, my stock liquid starter has had some interesting behavior in the fridge. It was initially mixed to "pancake batter" consistency. It has been in the fridge for 4 days. I stirred it last night without feeding it, and it had gotten much thicker - like the gluten had developed. No hooch. Smells really good, but not the true "SF SD" aroma yet.


David

LindyD's picture
LindyD

A fascinating experiment, David.


Looking forward to seeing where this road will take you.


You fed your starter with a mix of AP, WW, and rye, right?  What effect would such mixture have on the starter?

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Lindy.


I cannot remember who originally recommended the starter feeding mix I use. (Thom Leonard?) It is 70% AP, 20% WW and 10% Rye. I think the idea is that the beasties' growth is enhanced by the added minerals (ash) from the whole grain flours. The rye promotes acid production.


David

CarlSF's picture
CarlSF

Hi David,


If your goal is to make a sourdough bread that comes close to the SF sourdough bread, you might want to try to use a starter that has a lower hydration...maybe 50% instead of 75%.  This should give you a firmer starter which should have acetic characteristics that you might be looking for.

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Carl.


I agree with you, and, when the starter is more mature, I will probably make the SF Sourdough from "Crust & Crumb," which cold retards a very firm starter after activation and also the formed loaves. It usually gives me a moderately sour bread.


The present bake was just to see how a bread I make frequently would taste with the new starter at this young stage. I made no special effort to max acetic acid production.


BTW, this bread made outstanding French Toast this morning.


David

jannrn's picture
jannrn

GEORGEOUS Loaf David...and the crumb is amazing!! I bet it was delicious in french toast! One question...and again, my ignorance is hanging out....but how can SD taste like SF SD if it is being grown in Florida????? Will the water etc not affect the taste? Again, please forgive my ignorance......


Jann

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Jann.


The unique flavor of a "local" sourdough depends on the particular combination of yeast and lactobacillus species in the starter. I am using a starter that has the species typical of San Francisco. I have used this starter before, and the flavor of the bread was like real SF SD, but it changed over time. Currently, I'm giving this starter another try.


Water doesn't effect the taste, unless it's really bad water.


David