The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Just got Sunbeam 5891 machine- manual stinks- need reliable receipes

KevinP's picture
KevinP

Just got Sunbeam 5891 machine- manual stinks- need reliable receipes

After looking online, I agree with what most people say the manual is confusing and isn't very good.


I'm a complete novice with this, so I needed to know where I could go to find receipes that work in my machine.  I assume different machines would require different amounts of ingredients ???


All the receipes I see online don't specify which machine they are for.  Maybe I'm overthinking this too much, and a 2lb loaf is a 2lb loaf and would require the same ingredients regardless of what machine you have ???


Thanks for your help :)

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Hi, I have that machine also. However, I have only used it once to completely make and bake one loaf of bread. I did not like the texture of the crust(and somewhat the crumb) as compared to an oven baked bread. But that goes for pretty much any bread machine baked loaf, regardless of manufacturer.


Edit: You can make just about any recipe for any bread machine. I don't think any machine is rated to bake more than a 2 lb loaf, so any recipe with up to about 4 cups of bread flour, or 4-5 cups whole grain flours or mixtures of such are probably ok.


Ok, having said all that, I'm probably not being entirely fair to machine baked loaves, since it was the one and only loaf I baked(in the machine). And I didn't exactly use the freshest of ingredients. In my general education of bread baking(here, KA, King Arthur, etc) I have read that the crust/crumb textures of machine baked bread is a little different. That was also my experience with the one loaf. It was the whole wheat loaf in the manual.


Now I use the machine exclusively for kneading, and bake in my regualr oven. A couple of batches of dough per week, since about this past April. Since I just use for kneading, I make just about any recipe I desire, whether intended for the bread machine or not.


Again having said all that, there are thousands of recipes made to be baked in bread machines. To me, the site with the best written and most dependable recipes is King Arthur Flour(KAF). They have some recipes specifically baked in the machine, kneaded in machine but baked in oven, and of course just thousands of regular bread recipes.


The most consistent and dependable recipes are measured by weight. At least knowing how the flour was actually measured into the cup. There are several ways, resulting in different quantities of flour. KA recipes usually have weights, or you know that they measured with a cup of flour being 4.25 oz.(the flour is fluffed, gently sprinkled into cup, then leveled off).


Here is the link to their machine baked recipes:


 http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/yeast-breads-and-rolls/bread-machine-breads-baked-in-machine


There is a bread machine forum here at Fresh Loaf. Click the forums tab at top of any page to select.


Among many sites:


http://www.breadmachinedigest.com/category/recipes


http://www.bread-machine-recipes.com/


http://www.recipezaar.com/cookbook.php?bookid=109782


http://bread.betterrecipes.com/breadmachinerecipes.html


http://fp.enter.net/~rburk/breads/breadmachine/breadmachine.htm


 

KevinP's picture
KevinP

Thanks, MUCH appreciated :)

KevinP's picture
KevinP

Ok, checked out the King Flour website.  Ironcially enough I had already purchased their BREAD FLOUR since I figured that is what was needed to make BREAD.


 


But almost all of the bread machine receipes require ALL PURPOSE Flour or Whole Wheat.


 


They also say to use INSTANT YEAST not rapid rise.  I of course purchased BREAD MACHINE yeast, which according to what ou believe is either the same as rapid rise or instant.


 


Talk about my had spinning over something I was hoping was as simple as baking bread.  LOL

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

What you don't want to use, probably, is "active dry yeast", since it needs to be re-hydrated in warm water before use.  "Rapid Rise" is just a brand name for that company's version of "instant dry yeast."


I don't use bread machines, so I'm not sure why your recipes only call for AP or whole wheat.  What book or books are you using?


--Dan DiMuzio

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

Just to expand on that... Instant = Rapid = Bread Machine. Same critter, different names, even different jars from the same company. I suppose they figure having different labels means some people will buy both.  

KevinP's picture
KevinP

Ok, makes sense.


 


Also, would using Bread Flour as opposed to All Purpose Flour (King Arthur brand) produce greatly different results?

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

KA's Bread Flour is milled from "Hard Spring Wheat", which is very strong (12.7% protein).  Their All-Purpose is milled from "Hard Winter Wheat", which is still strong (11.7%) but not as strong as most spring wheat. 


The stronger a flour is, the more water it absorbs, so if a recipe calls for 6oz of water, then 10oz of Bread Flour will usually make a drier, firmer dough than would 10oz of All-Purpose (assuming both flours come from the same milling company).  That may or may not be what you want, but there would be a difference.


More protein is not always "better" for bread.  The need for strength in a bread dough and its relationship to extensibility or fermentation tolerance is more complex than that.  Some things like bagels need very high protein flour (14% or so) while a traditional baguette made in North America is probably better paired with a much lower protein flour -- maybe 11-12%, preferably from hard winter wheat. 


If you haven't already purchased Jeffrey Hamelman's book, entitled Bread, I'd strongly recommend that you do so.  Even if you want to be casual in your approach to baking, you should still get some information on the basics of how bread works.  It's a great read, and it has terrific, reliable formulas.


--Dan DiMuzio

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Bought KA bread flour(bf) only to then find out most of their recipes call for their all purpose.


All the breads still come out fine. Their bread flour may absorb a little more water than the ap so you may often need and extra tablespoon or so more water than the recipe calls for.


Basically KA all purpose is a bread flour as compared to most brands all purpose because it has a higher protein content. I have since changed to White Lilly bread flour because it's much cheaper here in the south and has about the same protein content(11.7%) as the KA all purpose.

laxmom4x's picture
laxmom4x

HI


 


I am a newbie here, but I got the Sunbeam for my B'day last June.  I like it.  I don't have the energy or patience to knead homemade dough myself.  I am, however, just about  ready to try dough in the machine and bake in my regular oven.  (Just because I am impatient doesn't mean I am not curious!)


I researched machines before I asked for the Sunbeam, which got a good review for the price.   I knew from the get-go that the manual recipes would be a waste.  So I bought two bread machine cookbooks, Bread Machine Magic, and The Bread Lover's Bread Machine Cookbook.  Both have great recipes.  Magic's only problem was recommending Active Dry Yeast. Bread Machine Yeast or Rapid Rise is what works for me and my machine.  Am I right to assume that it would be better to use Active Dry Yeast for just machine dough/ oven baked?


I use bread flour in my recipes when it calls for flour, (KA or Pillsbury whatever is on sale at the time) I think I will try a recipe with AP and see what happens! 



Thanks for the insite and links!


 


Janet


 

kathym166's picture
kathym166

Here is a recipe to try that I have been perfecting.


1cup plus 2 tbsp water


3cups plus 2 tbsp lily white flour


1 1/4 tsp salt


2 lg tbsp sugar


4 tbsp unsalted butter


1/4 cup dry milk powder


1/3 cup instant potato flakes


dash ginger ( yeast loves it)/ Last add a scant 2 tsp rapid rise yeast

kathym166's picture
kathym166

I have the same machine and I put the ingred in from above entry start machine on dough setting let mix just till ingred are wet. Turn off machine give ingred a fine mist of water or oil to keep moist. Let set 15 min( takes that long to restart machine. Then start machine again on dough cycle and let it go through til raised. I then take dough out of machine and let rise in a glass loaf pan for about 30 min. Put in preheated 350 oven for 35-40 minutes. Do not cut untill cool. This has been the best loaf I've made so far. Let me know what you think. Also in above entry flour was lily white bread flour and that has worked best for me.