The Fresh Loaf

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iodized salt

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marieJ's picture
marieJ

iodized salt

Greetings!  I'd like to use iodized salt in my sourdough loaves.  I've been baking sourdough for about 1 1/2 years.  Can iodized salt be used in sourdoughs or does it have an adverse effect on the yeast & bacteria culture?


Cheers!  Marie.


 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I use it all the time (Morton's table salt) and never found any difference between it and kosher salt in the way the dough developed or the flavor of the bread.  Measured, of course, by weight not volume.

Davo's picture
Davo

I use it and it's fine. It's also good for thyroid health. Trust me, whose better half has suffered hashimotos and had hers removed, and is now on thyroxine tablets for the rest of her life. Many parts of the world have an iodine deficiency, and just using iodised salt fixes that.

marieJ's picture
marieJ

Thanks Dave and Flournwater.


Given the lengthy process of creating a sourdough loaf, I'd hate to set one aside to proof only to come home and find it has keeled over on me!  Despite the way I thrust a loaf into a scorching oven (!!!),  like many sourdough afficionados I actually prefer to be nurturing and caring toward my loaves and starters (Laugh!).  Thanks for your input.  I had an inkling that iodine has antibacterial properties and thought it may impact upon the culture.


 


Cheers!


Marie


NB: I usually use sea salt.

marieJ's picture
marieJ

Thanks Dave.  My reason for incorporating iodized salt into my loaves is also for health benefits.  My health is good but I'd like to improve on it because I've acknowledge - like you have - that most of the world is indeed iodine deficient.  Here in Australia we have problems with zinc and magnesium deficiencies because our top soils are deficient in both of these essential minerals/metals.  Health experts tell us via commercial media to eat lean red meat to boost our essential intake of these 2 vital elements, but if the elements do not exist in the soil, they do not exist in the plants grown in this soil (plants are able to manufacture vitamins, but they cannot manufacture elements such as zinc, etc- they need to take them up through the roots), and if they do not exist in the plants, they do not exist in the animals that graze on these plants.  Hence lean beef minus essential elements.


I empathize with your wife having to take thyroxine medication.  A close friend of mine needs to do so as well.  She cannot function properly without them.  Sometimes her behaviour begins to go slightly left of normal and our response is to ask her if she has missed her supplements.  The answer is always 'oops!'.  A little understanding goes a long way to helping someone you care about.


 


Thanks for the info.


 


Cheers!


Marie.


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I have used only pure sea salt without iodine for years.  I'm 65 real soon and have no health problems..  I eat kelp when I have the chance..like at susi bars and I also use a kelp granule.  My favorite is fleur de sel..I could hurt myself on this salt it is so delicious.  I also keep the gray sea salt.  Regular salt like the one with the little girl in the rain tastes so bad to me.  I think there is a lot of salt we consume that is we are not aware of in many foods.  I haven't used salted butter for years..now I can appreciate the real flavor of butter.  This is only my opinion and I just thought I put in my 2 cents! 


Sylvia  

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

How is it possible to have sea salt without iodine? 


Mini

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Sorry, Mini, I knew I was going to hear about this.. I wish I could express myself as well as you do. I haven't used iodized regular table salt for years..Kelp granules make a nice replacement for a salt shaker when avoiding the use of any salt and has it's health benefits.


Sylvia

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

There is a previous discussion on salt here: 


http://tfl.thefreshloaf.com/node/13006/bread-salt


Unrefined sea salt tastes wonderful and contains naturally occuring iodine. From a health standpoint I do not use processed salt as it contains a number of undersirable chemicals added after the salt has been stripped of its natural minerals.


Jeff

Davo's picture
Davo

Check question 14.


http://www.iqplusin.org/Faqs.htm


There's a lot of debate about the relative bioavailability of iodine in sea salt versus iodised salt. And a lot of claims that sea salt has enough iodine. It probably doesn't matter if your food comes from iodine rich areas, and/or you eat a lot of seafood, but the sinlge biggest factor in reducing goiters is changing the population over to iodised salt. There was an Australian aid project into an area of China where goiter rates were way up in the 10s of percent of the whole population. SImply feeding them iodised salt brought this rate down pretty much immediately.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Simple is not always that simple.  But a good start.  Iodized salt has helped many people.  Agreed.  There are also foods when combined with iodine foods at the same meal inhibit the absorbtion of iodine, many being in the cabbage family for example.  It is important to not only increase available iodine but reduce the food combinations that prevent the body from absorbing the little amounts that are eaten.  Some cultures are packed with these types of food.  Food habits tend to be cultural and can create small pockets of population that have particular needs due to heredity and lopsided food consumption.  It is good when those needs are discovered and corrected as well.


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