The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Good ol' sandwich bread

  • Pin It
Elagins's picture
Elagins

Good ol' sandwich bread

With all the focus on artisan breads and uber-ethnic loaves, I thought it might be fun to indulge my contrarian streak and bake a batch of good ol' white bread ... you know, bologna sandwiches, french toast, things like that. Thing is, I have this really nice organic bread flour and fresh compressed yeast that I hadn't used on pan bread before. So I did it: 60% skim milk, 2% salt, 8% each egg, oil and sugar, 3% yeast (to compensate for the enrichments). Well, the dough doubled in less than 45 minutes and proofed in 45 minutes. Baked at 350 for half an hour, and here's the result:



Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

Comments

audra36274's picture
audra36274

   My kids would love it! All the work I do on crisp crust and my kids peel off every bit! It makes me wonder some times if my focus in in the right place. I want my baking to be enjoyed by my whole family! They love milk bread and anything that makes a mean grill cheese! And it ain't bad!.......


                                                             Audra

Elagins's picture
Elagins

is that it's so broad and flexible. you can do anything with those ingredients you want, from heavy to light crusts, chewy, flaky, flavored, plain, large crumb, fine crumb ... it's a vast universe we inhabit and there's always something new to discover in even the most familiar neighborhoods.


my daughter, who categorically refuses to eat any of my bread, claiming that store-bought is always better than anything made at home - has become a huge fan of this loaf. now, won't have anything else for her lunch sandwiches!


Stan

dollhead's picture
dollhead

Stan-your bread looks wonderful and I bet it tastes every bit as good as it looks.  That crust is to die for.  Thanks for sharing with us!

Elagins's picture
Elagins

i have the milk and sugar to thank for that lovely crust. it may help to know that i usually keep 2 stones in my oven, and baked these loaves (2 of them) on the 2nd from the bottom shelf setting, so the center of the pan was at about midpoint of the oven. i kept my second stone on the lowest shelf setting, so i didn't have anything in the way of cloche or stone oven effect, which i would have had if i'd put the second stone above the loaves.

tananaBrian's picture
tananaBrian

How was it for relative sweetness and tenderness of the crumb?  Was it fluffy?  It's a nice looking loaf regardless.  My kids' favorite breads are the white or white blend (rye, WW) artisan loaves as first choice, the sandwich loaves I make (50/50 white/WW, sweetened with clover honey) as second choice, the sandwich loaves my wife makes in our Z bread machine, and last of all ...store-bought loaves.  They don't like store bread!  Most of what they eat is made in the bread machine, for convenience, since both my wife and I work full time.


Brian


 

Elagins's picture
Elagins

obviously the milk, sugar and shortening are gonna tenderize the crumb. however, the flour, at around 12.5-13% protein gives a somewhat chewier crumb than, say, AP, which is fine, since the added gluten makes for a much higher rise. i loaded those loaves (30oz in 2qt pans) when the tops were about 1/2" above the edge of the pan, so you can see i got really nice oven spring at 350.

i'll take that loaf over bakery bread any day!!!

Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

ladychef41's picture
ladychef41

To this day, my FAVORITE bread is still a loaf of plain white bread. It's my all time fovorite comfort food and reminds me of when I was little and helped my mom bake bread...


 


Wendy

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

Would you translate the percentages into cups/teaspoons/tablespoons on all the ingredients you used for this white bread?  It looks wonderful, but I'm not a professional baker and need the "plain folks" translation.  Thanks!  I'm anxious to give it a try for French toast.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

should yield pretty close results:


Bread Flour  4 cups
Milk    1 1/2 cups
Egg    1 large, lightly beaten
Oil    3 Tbs
Sugar 3 Tbs + 1 tsp
Salt  1 3/4 tsp
Yeast:   Fresh 1/2 1oz cake
            Active Dry 3 tsp
            Instant 2 tsp


Enjoy!


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

My standard sandwich bread is very close to what Stan shows here.  A few small differences:


1.) I use brown sugar.  Adds a bit of flavor.


2.) I use butter vs. oil.


3.) I use 10% white whole wheat flour.  Not enough to make is seem like a whole wheat at all but enough to be line with "white" flour in Europe.  


4.) I make a starter the night before with 1/3 of the flour at a hydration of 80%.  Not much work and I think it adds a lot of flavor.  


I use this dough for sandwich bread, hamburger buns, dinner rolls, and cinnamon rolls.  It makes up about 40 % of my bread baking.  Makes great toast too.


Dave

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

I LOVE this website!  Thank you for the quick reply.  I know what's going to be baked this weekend (and used for French toast).  My BLTs will have a new lease on life as well.

Elagins's picture
Elagins

the yeast measures are OR, not AND, so only use one of the yeasts.

audra36274's picture
audra36274

   Here's your bread! Thanks !


Elagins's picture
Elagins

and it's beautiful .... nice job!!!

audra36274's picture
audra36274

should see it now! They have eaten half of it!

genem5329's picture
genem5329

Hey Stan,


I'm a little slow on the uptake but how much flour did you use?  Did I miss something?  Looks like the ingredients specified add up to 83%, could the rest be flour?  My kids love basic white, can't beat it for toasted cheese or PBJ.


Gene Maxwell



Elagins's picture
Elagins

Flour is always 100%, so if I use 1000g of flour, the milk is 600g and the eggs, oil and sugar are each 80g. I find it much easier to work in grams than in pounds and ounces, since it's a decimal system.

MommaT's picture
MommaT

Hi,


I just made two loaves of sandwich white yesterday!


I used the Farm Loaf recipe from Beard on Bread.  A friend recently gave me this bread cookbook.  I was dubious, but the recipes turn out really well...at least the straight dough ones I've tried so far!


Enjoy!


MommaT

Trialer70's picture
Trialer70

Well, I made the bread today and every scrap of it got devoured at a family dinner.  I was hard-pressed to find crumbs left on the breadboard.  This is one excellent white bread recipe!  Thanks again for the great back-to-basics bread.  I used buttermilk instead of milk and it was a nice addition.  Definitely a keeper.

AnnaInMD's picture
AnnaInMD

when we married 22 years ago, my (pampered) husband loved his sandwiches with the crust cut off - the Wonder Bread kind !  21 years later and my getting around to baking our bread, the crust cannot be crunchy enough to his liking !!  Yeeeehawww, we CAN change 'em !

avatrx1's picture
avatrx1

I really do enjoy cooking and baking but I'm not a big eater so I'm faced with the dilemma of cooking for a picky hubby who prefers store bought 'soft' breads to the wonderful crusty breads that I like.


This would be perfect for him.  He'll look at a nice loaf of Italian bread and say it's good but you can't make a sandwich with it. Unless I toast it or turn it into a Panini - he prefers bread made in the bread machine which is soft and fluffy.  I, on the other hand,  like a good hunk of good bread with a bowl of hearty soup or just to dip into a really good dipping oil.


I really like using my starters.  Could you advise me on how I might covert this recipe from yeast to sourdough?


My baking doesn't go unrewarded.  My brother and his lady friend RAVE about my breads.  She has even started bread baking again because they live 4 hours from me and only get these breads when they come to visit.


My hubby also HATES onions.  Try cooking for someone like that................


He does love my pies so it's not all in vain.


-susie

Elagins's picture
Elagins

hi susie, 


easiest way to do it, i think, is to take 50% of whatever amount of milk you're using, 30% of the flour and about a tablespoon of your starter and use that to create the sponge. after the sponge has doubled in volume, just add the other ingredients and either reduce the yeast by 1/2 to 2/3, or eliminate it entirely, then go ahead with your fermentation, benching and proofing.


Stan Ginsberg
www.nybakers.com