The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

The Simple Things

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tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

The Simple Things

 


I was ready to leave for our hideout in Wisconsin when I realized that I forgot to prepare bread to take with me. Now a week without my bread was not an option. I decided to (mis)use my rye sourdough starter St.Clair, just refreshed two days ago, and mix some dough together for my simple sourdough bread, take this dough with me and bake it in the cabin. To make the story short, I overestimated the strength of this Montana baby and the bread came out as a brick. Not too happy, I was still without bread, I looked at my options. What I found was a plastic bowl, 2 lb or 907 grams of Gold Medal AP flour, of course bleached etc., a package of active dry yeast and salt.



Well that should be enough to create a cabin bread. I mixed all the ingredients together in the bowl, measured the water with the empty root beer bottle (591ml) and stirred it together for a 65% hydrated dough. I took it out of the bowl and slapped and stretched it (Méthode Bertinet: http://www.gourmet.com/magazine/video/2008/03/bertinet_sweetdough) till it was a nice and firm dough. After an hour I stretched and folded (s&f) it once like Mark Sinclair (Méthode St.Clair) and then left it alone for 3 hours (had to go hunting). The cabin temperature was only 60°F so it worked out well and after this time the dough was ready for another s&f. In the meantime I heated the cabin to its normal 70ºF and after another hour, a s&f I shaped it into two loafs, let it proof for 30 min and put them in the 30 year old oven at 450ºF (more or less?). I added a little bit of water, I was afraid to much would kill this oldie, for steam, and 35 min later, tadaaa I had my simple cabin bread.




A little bit under proofed but ............ and was it good.


 


Und die Moral der Geschichte: sometimes simple things taste as good as the complicated stuff and of course I will not take bread with me from home anymore when I go up north.


 


Thomas


More pictures you find here: http://tssaweber.com/WP/2009/10/the-simple-things/

Comments

Trishinomaha's picture
Trishinomaha

This looks wonderful! I have a hard time turing out a loaf this pretty even when I'm in my own  kitchen with all my tools and ingredients!

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Hi Trish-in-Omaha


Thanks for the compliment, I learned a lot during my internship at Mark's Back Home Bakery, but I'm sure your bread looks as good as mine.


Thomas

jannrn's picture
jannrn

That is BEAUTIFUL!! And it would seem that no matter where you are, if you have an idea what you are doing, you can make it happen!!! If it tasted half as good as it looks, it MUST have been awesome!!!
Jannrn

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Hi Jannrn


That's exactly what I'm happy about, even in difficult conditions I was able to make good bread and believe me it tasted better than it looked, but that's maybe my biased opinion, but who cares.


Thomas

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

I was immediately intrigued, thinking you used root beer in your recipe. What kind of folly has he gotten into, I wondered? I'm glad to see your senses prevailed and you came up with 2 great looking loaves in more rustic surroundings than usual. Nice crumb!


Betty 

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Hey Betty, 


Luckily I don't like Root Beer, so I was throwing that yucky dark liquid rinsed the bottle and put good spring water in it. I'm glad you like the breads.


Thomas

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Sorry but it is hard to find here.  I grew up on the stuff.  Beautiful bread!


Mini

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Hi Mini Oven


Thanks for the compliment.


Well "Geschmaecker sind verschieden", but wenn you sent me a couple of Mozart Kugeln and Marzipan I will  have no problem to send you a few bottles of Root Beer.


Thomas


 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

There is something wholesome about bread made in deer camp. Everything tastes better in fresh air. Your breads look great and that 9 point buck looks pretty good too. Thanks for sharing. BTW your starter was probably just less active from the cold cabin.


Eric

tssaweber's picture
tssaweber

Thanks Eric, Cabin Bread is now an integral part of deer camp. But when I'm up in God's Country everything is great anyhow; I know you live in Wisconsin and I assume you are a hunter too, so check out my latest blog entry: http://tssaweber.com/WP/2009/10/fall-in-the-drifless-area-in-wisconsin/.


Probably I didn't pay enough attention to St.Clair and he disliked that very much and on top of that the cabin temperature probably was upsetting him too. This starter, even though from Montana, seems to be of delicate nature................


Thanks for your comment, Thomas