The Fresh Loaf

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Bread/Convection/Microwave combined baking.

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bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Bread/Convection/Microwave combined baking.

I have a Sharp Micro/conv. oven  The manual says use low mix bake for bread/rolls . It also will let you put in a different temp than the 325 Degree normal and time. My recipes calls for pre heat. Sharp manual says no pre heat needed.  I have tried 40-50 lbs of flour over the last 4-5 months and have never got a good loaf of bread no matter what way I bake. convection alone or combo from manual.


Has any one had any luck . I lower temp25 degrees if convection only.


Did nothing but change the temp and on the low bake side . So discouraging. Sharp technical knew less that I did after a long conversation with no answers.


Thanks for reading my post and any help would more than be appreciated books or stand alone recipe for any kind of bread in a conv/microwave combination oven that I can at least try. I just am not sure if it is a operator problem with lack of knowledge on how to read after 70 plus years.


 


Thanks


Mr. Bob


www.siemann.us


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Mr. Bob.


You can use either convection or regular baking for bread. Don't use microwave. The right temperature for baking depends on the kind of bread you are baking.


Can you tell us the recipe and procedures you are currently using? What do you find lacking in the bread you have been baking?


I'm sure we can help you bake good bread.


David

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

 


Hi David


Thanks for the quick reply.  Have been trying now for about 6-7 months.  Always had a good loaf but was from a conventional oven from years ago.   I will put in a recipe soon as I can.  I am going to try the pre heat to max one time and then see how it comes out.


Have a great day


Bob 

montanagrandma's picture
montanagrandma

I do a lot of my baking in my Micro/Conv oven. I Never use anything but convection when baking breads. I always preheat to the highest temp possible 450*,  when ready put in my loaf and make adjustments to temp at that time. Convection will dry the skin out quickly, so I always spray my loaf with water or use a egg wash before loading. I bake loaf on parchment directly on the turn table. I have great luck with my standard french bread / rolls recipes. Hope that helps!

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

 


Hi There young lady 


  I travel and live full time since 87. Spend 6 months here in Happy Trails west pf PHX.  I have pre heated but never did a max and then drop the temp. My bread has never been really good. Not like baking in a conv. Oven.  I must have tried 5-6-7-8 different recipes from on line and books. Even a standard yeast bread loaf does not have the consistency I have had before. I eat???  1 slice not like the whole loaf as before when cooled.  Must be an operator error. Temp is perfect from the gauge I used.  I have baked in a pan for regular bread never tried to just put on the turn table.  Have used parchment paper on a couple ciabratta loaves but not much better.


I wonder if it is that I am expecting too much taste.  I can't even get  good home made biscuits. Now that's down on the totem pole.


 


   Thanks


         Bob


         This my home  www.siemann.us

montanagrandma's picture
montanagrandma

on your bread. Living in all sorts of elevations..... we travel al lot for work, I take the temp of my bread when the time says its ready.... then if my loaf is not at leat 200* I leave it going until it is. That helps the crumb/texture, and taste in my opinion. I bake mostly artsian type doughs / also have two sourdough starters in my frig. One from Montana and one from Oklahoma. That will give you more taste ;-)


Right now I am in Pueblo Colorado..elev 4300? , but when we get to Yuma (dec-mar) my bread making changes. Using the same recipe-yeast amount, I get much higher and fluffier french bread


Here is a link to some info that may be useful;


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/9870/baking-times-and-temperatures


 


 

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Hmmmmmmmm  will try another temp unit. This one was new. I go to Yuma every once in a while. Have quite a few friends there.  Is the link you gave me for a conventional oven or a convectional type like we use.


 


   Thanks for the reply


                   Bob


 

scottbutcher's picture
scottbutcher

None of these posts is specific enough to be able to offer any advice.  You do not say what is wrong with your loaves. Are they too dense, too dry, not well risen? In other words, what does "does not have the consistency of" mean precisely?  If you cannot be specific, it is impossible to help you. Nevertheless, here are some generalizations that apply to any type of oven: the texture of bread depends predominantly on the flour/water ratio. Any other considerations are secondary to this. Now here is a bit of information every baker has to be aware of - you can NEVER depend on a recipe to know whether or not you have the flour/water ratio correct because this will vary vastly depending on the humidity of the air and of the flour itself. A bread recipe, at best, is a very rough indication of the quantities you will need. You have to be able to tell from the feel of the dough whether or not you have reached the right point and should stop adding flour to your mixture. In general, too much flour is the most common error. Erring on the side of a moister dough is always your best bet. Regarding oven temperature, if your oven is very hot, the outside of the bread will get hard before it has had a chance to rise. This is why commercial bread-baking ovens have an initial steam cycle which causes the bread to rise without drying the surface. Convection/microwave combination baking does something similar in that the bread rises before the surface hardens. You can simulate a steam cycle by spraying the walls of the oven just before putting the bread in the oven, being careful not to get any spray on the oven light. Alternatively you can place a container on the lower rack and pour boiling water into it. (In a Sharp, you will need the optional rack but remember that if you use the combo cycle, you cannot put metal on the rack) I get good results because I understand the science behind it. I hope that you now do so as well.

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Hi Scott


   I wonder if we or they are talking about the same kind of a convection oven.  My oven is a Sharp Over the range Micro/Convection Oven.  Carosel . Model R-1874-1875


If I could have a conventional oven in my Notor Coach it would be a pleasure


  Highest temp is 450 degrees on pre heat. No racks just 2 round removeable ones .


Baking with a regular oven my bread is very nice bread not to many kinds do I bake but what ever I bake comes out ok.  I have only been baking bread about 50 years in a conventional oven so I have a lot to learn when baking with a comvection / microwave unit that is really a waste of money. Ok to warm up a cup of water in a hurry. 


 It does ok on lot of baking but not always as good as a conventional oven.  You input is very educational. I have not seen in your post where you mentioned that we both are using a combination small unit so that I can answer your questions in a educated way from my experience in what is happening.


Thanks for the nice reply


Bob


www.siemann.us


  


 


 

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Bob - I was looking up on the model that you mentioned. Looks like you do have a convection only function. I relooked at your initial posting, and noted that you use 300F for baking which is a very low temperature for baking bread. 400-450 is usually used, which will take you to bake a small loaf of 300g bread for 30 minutes or so, and less for rolls, same as any other convection oven.

As for preheating, you may want to use a manual preheating mode instead of the suggested non preheating is required. Even for the convection function, you want to use the manual mode - ie, key in the temperature and the timing.

For the low bake I suspect its at about 325F or 350F, which is usually good for baking cookies only.

I'm also using a convection/microwave machine, but in baking bread, I use the convection only function and treat it like a old convection oven, that is, preheat, and put it a good high enough temperature.

Hope this helps.

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Hi J


Not sure why I might have put that temp in. I was quite frustrated wioth the darn thing and might have done a typo.  I do use the manual pre heat. Convection.   Book says twp ways to bake one if less than 20 min utes the other more than 20 inutes. I will play aroiunbd with it on the road but so far not impressed. lol


Thanks for saying hello again.


  Bob


 


 

scottbutcher's picture
scottbutcher

Yes, we are talking about the same type of oven exasctly. A different model number by the same manufacturer will make little difference to the results.  Here is what Wayen Gisslen has to say in "Professional Baking",


'Temperature must be adjusted for the product being baked. At the proper temperature, the inside of the unit becomes completely baked at the same time that the crust achieves the disired color. Therefore:


1. Large units are baked at a lower temperature and for a longer time than small rolls spaced apart. ... popular American lean breads are baked at 400º to 425ºF.


This is for a conventional oven. Convection ovens require a lower temp as your instruction manual will inform you.  In the case of 'low-mix bake' , the mixture of microwave energy and radiant heat completely changes the requirement for high radiant heat because the bread bakes from the inside as well as from the surface inward. The Sharp Convection Microwave Cookbook gives 25 min for one loaf and 30 min for 2 loaves. If you don't get the browning you want, you can change the temperature by pressing a different temp button when 325ºF appears on the display.


The optional rack is a separate purchase and can be found easily on the web including at Amazon and e-bay. It costs from $18 to $25 or so but I don't have one myself.

jennyloh's picture
jennyloh

Hi Bob - which model are you using?


There are certain models with limited variations on the use of microwave and/or convection.  Sounds like yours a mixed model,  which is very different from using convection only.  

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

Hi J
   Yes this is a dual model. Microwave/Convection. They put these in a motor home these days to save space and especially money. Tops it will pre heat to is 450 degrees.  Manufactured by Sharp.  I am going to mess with it a little more this summer. All last summer was a disaster.
 Thanks for the quick reply,
   Bob
www.siemann.us

scottbutcher's picture
scottbutcher

I should also add that convection baking will dry out the surface of the bread faster than a conventional oven because of the circulating air.  This can also cause a loaf that is cooked on the surface before the middle is done. It is important to lower the temperature by at least 25ºF as instructed but more than 25º may be necessary.  You have to experiment with both temperature and time.  Different brands of oven may give vastly different results.  Also, some convection ovens have more than one fan speed which makes a very significant difference.  Sharp convection microwaves have only one speed, as far as I know, so this is irrelevant in this case.  Covering the bread with foil for part of the bake time is another way of controlling the degree of browning and surface cooking.  The technicians at  Sharp are paid to do all these experiments but in practice who knows what they do.  You are your own best researcher.

nicodvb's picture
nicodvb

Hi,


my micro/convection/grill combo has  a fast preheat that I find extremely useful: it reaches a given temperature using a combination of grill and convection for as long as necessary (generally 7-8 minutes, then I resort to convection only.


You have to be even more careful because the grill will dry the surface even more than convection alone, but if you take the right countermeasures (such as spraying often, covering the surface with something) the result will be great and oven spring will be *fantastic*.

bobkay1022's picture
bobkay1022

 Hi Just got this reply . Sorry if I did not get the first one.   Yes i assume you got it right on the head. Mine is a combination Micr/convection that is used in a Motor Home. I will be on the road again a about 3 days and will try to experiment a little more.


I installed a new Home type oven in my Cassida here at the resort and have been making delicious bread . So now I will see if I can do any thing with this oven I have to live with.


Thanks for the input and will post again


Mr.Bob


www.siemann.us