The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

autolyse

allthingsread's picture
allthingsread

autolyse

didn't work for me obviously did something very wrong mixed up flour and water and left for 20mins came to mix in the rest put in tin then warm spot and it hasn't budged an inch have I wasted the whole lot please

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi again,


An autolyse is not a fermentation period, but rather a process which allows the flour and water (salt is not added until later) to blend and hydrate the flour.  At the end of the autolyse, the dough will be much more pliable - without any kneading!


You have not wasted anything because the dough is not supposed to rise during the autolyse.


In your other post you asked about kneading time.  When we work with bread, we are working with the development of the dough, not how many minutes have ticked by on the clock. 


You can always do a windowpane test to check on the gluten development, or just by tugging on the dough to gauge its strength. 


Here's a link which gives a bit of info which you might find helpful, from Red Hen Baking


You might also consider purchasing a good basic bread book, such as Peter Reinhart's Bread Baker's Apprentice.  Perhaps your library has some books on the topic.


Not to worry, though, you haven't wasted anything!

allthingsread's picture
allthingsread

I am not computer litterate so this may come up twice it doesn't come up straight away so could also be my impatience  my dough came out dry and lumpy at the end but living in a different country and it is was quite warm so water could have been a bit more than the recipe said some was quite edible the other wasn;t


it did come up just not where I expected it

allthingsread's picture
allthingsread

hi I split the dough in two put half in the machine to knead and left the other half baked at the same time the one that was kneaded is not high but edible the other one yuk

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hi...


I'm not sure what you mean when you say you're not computer literate.  The fact that you found TFL means you have pretty good computer skills!


I don't know what type of flour you are working with, or your recipe.  If you gave those details we could do some troubleshooting.


In the interim, there's a tab at the top of the screen named "Handbook."  It's the TFL electronic book on bread baking which you might find helpful.

allthingsread's picture
allthingsread

was using bakers (bread) flour 2lb to 20oz hot tap water left it for the 20 mins (could have been a bit longer) anyway I took it as not needing to knead but it said not to knead as much I think I know where I went wrong and it was quite warm here yesterday so possibly could have used a bit more water will try again soon and have a go a hand kneading

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Mini

allthingsread's picture
allthingsread

sorry mini but what exactly do you mean haven't got back to bread making yet still eating the ones I have made leaven is that another word for yeast (yes I am very new at this) and still don't know the terms

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

did you put into the bread to make it rise?   A leaven is a substance added to make (in this case) dough rise.  You mention flour & water and then the "rest" but that was unclear and may or may not include something to raise the dough.


It is possible to forget the yeast...  (I did it once.)


Mini

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

did you put into the bread to make it rise?   Yes, leaven is a substance added to make dough rise.  In your post, you mention flour & water and then added "the rest" but that was unclear and may or may not include something to raise the dough.  There is no mention of yeast, so that is why I'm asking.


It is possible to forget the yeast...  (I did it once.)


Mini

Tallahassee Baker Paul's picture
Tallahassee Bak...

Autolyze is a simple method of resting a rough dough to allow it to become less sticky and easier to handle.  It can be done on a bench or in a mixer.  Salt is not added until after the autolyze and the salt also brings the dough together and reduces the tackiness, making it easier to handle.


Leavening is any method that introduces fermentation and begins a process of capturing gasses generated by chemical reactions.  Sourdoughs are non-yeasted leaveners, as well as baking soda and baking powder.  Yeast is a commercial product of living cells that eat starches and sugars.  The activity causes gas formation and doughs will rise during fermentation.


Controlling fermentation means adjusting the temperature of the dough.  A dough that is too warm will use up the sugars and starches too quickly and result in a tasteless loaf.  Slow fermentation, usually be refrigeration, and fermenting in stages provides optimum conditions for better tasting and heartier loaves.