The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Glebe flour bread mixes

PRayner's picture
PRayner

Glebe flour bread mixes

We are a small producer making and supplying organic bread mixes, organic spelt and rye and gluten free mixes. The organic mixes are home grown, stoneground and packed on our family farm.

Makes great bread and mostly its 'just add water' to the mix in your bread machine. Makes great bread by hand too.

We've just setup on-line ordering and can mail order throughout the UK, or it available in lots of smaller shops throughout the UK (please see stockists list).

Apologies for advertising in a forum but this is an interesting site and hope that people find it useful.

www.glebe-flour.co.uk

 

Glebe flourlogo

helend's picture
helend

If you look back through some of my posts you'll see I've mentioned Glebe Flour and their fantastic flour.  I can only comment on the chocolate cake mix which is gluten-free but I use their flour and it is top-notch as is the service.  They are the only UK stockist of white spelt flour I can find and have just made a loaf of white yoghurt bread using their flour.

Besides always wanting to support "real" producers, the organic and traditional I am simply a fan of good standards and service so make no apology for speaking up. 

In order to be fair I must also mention Bacheldre Mill for again brilliant flour and service also Picks Organic and the bestest pig and bacon from Woodhouse Farm-they all have websites!

PRayner's picture
PRayner

Thanks very much Helen and always glad to hear of happy customers!

We're also hoping that mail order may help other people sample our wares. Having now sourced a great delivery service for orders of up to 24bags (for retail customers), we'd like to encourage everyone to have a look at our site.

White yoghurt bread sounds interesting!

best wishes

Glebe Farm  -Organic, Spelt, Seeded and Gluten free bread mixes, cake mixes and flours.

www.glebe-flour.co.uk

HUGO's picture
HUGO

After the baby spinach fiasco here in america ''organic'' isn't always the best way to go. For instance all the mice and rats that dwell in grain bins. Some sort of sanitation must be practiced to mill clean flour from contaminated ''organic'' grain. No pun intended but ''safety first''.
hugo

kategill0's picture
kategill0

an excellent article in the NY Times last week addresses the contaminated spinach fiasco, and exactly the reasons why "industrializing" our food has caused it. Organic and Local all the way for me.

Click here

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

mentioned by kategill0. It is chilling reading! And I agree entirely. I buy all organic here in the UK when I can. Which fortunately, is available more and more.But I DON'T buy it from a supermarket, as the system of collection / distribution still means that it is several days old, when from the local organic producer it is fresh each morning.

There's a lot of debate at present here about the relative merits of organic v. agrobusiness produced, with the agro boys claiming that the nutritional profile of mass produced food is identical to organic. Which I think is rubbish - there's a huge spectrum of micronutrients which they don't test for, which I am sure are more prevalent in organic food.

Certainly, there is something there to account for the vastly superior flavour of organic! And the comfort of knowing it isn't dripping in pesticides, pharmeceuticals, inorganic chemicals etc etc - I want the flavour of my food to be good AND wholesome!

Andrew

helend's picture
helend

Hi Hugo

I am interested in your post.  Can you elaborate for me as I don't really know anything about a "spinach" fiasco.  Also rats in grain bins is definitely not related to organic/non-organic status - believe me I've lived around farms a long time and rats are always a problem - chemicals or no!  

The best remedy, I believe, is to have confidence in your supplier-something I've found easier to establish with independent organic or locally accredited producers that I can build up a relationship with and monitor quality through local sources etc.

Rats or no, I prefer my food with as few artificial chemicals as possible :)

HUGO's picture
HUGO

Hi lelend,
Sorry to upset you about ''organic''. Using ''organic'' has good intentions. However chemicals are also organic but tuned to a specific task. In the milling of flour some sort of cleaning must be carried out to promote sanitation. be it radiation or bleach. Rodents in a grain bin storage are like flies on sugar. Rodents carry multiple germs and viruses and excrete on the grain in the bins/elevators. This grain should be sanitized before milling. The oven sanitizes the dough but the dusting flour on the board can be contaminated.

In california ecoli was discovered on spinach the past few weeks. Several people died and many were ill. Perhaps it was the cow manure? The identical strain of ecoli was discovered on the manure. spinach has nothing to do with grain or flour. However, not all so called ''organic'' foods serve the public sanitary expectations.

chemicals are ''regulated''. Bad organic practices are ''not'' regulated and have a ''free ride'' until sickness or death occurs.

Organic is great, but ''clean'' is better.
Hugo Donatelli

andrew_l's picture
andrew_l

Personally, I'd rather face a very small risk of meeting some unhygenic something on vegetables - (I wash my spinach and all other veg thoroughly - and so, I am sure do most people) than face a certainty of meeting with pesticides, anti mould treatments etc which won't wash off and ending up eating small amounts of accumulating toxins.

All the organic foods which I buy here in the UK are clean, nutritious, taste superb - and residue free. The organic farms have to meet stringent regulations and controls. I'll stick to organics, thanks.

Andrew