The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Here's a grainy challenge for you!

princess_mitzi's picture
princess_mitzi

Here's a grainy challenge for you!

Having just noticed the prices of Vogel's Flaxseed and Spelt bread, I decided it can't be that hard to make my own.  Famous last words.  I concocted a recipe by stealing bits of other recipes, threw it in the breadmaker, and got very excited when the smells started to emerge.  However, when the bread emerged, I didn't get quite so excited as it had collapsed.  I still ate it and it was delicious, albeit, flat.


Here is the recipe I used: 2 tsp Edmunds active yeast, 250 gm white flour, 80 gm spelt flour, 20 gm kibbled wheat, 80 gm flaxseed, 1 Tbsp bround sugar, 1.5 Tbsp Butter, 1.5 Tbsp Milk powder, 1 tsp salt, 300 ml water, 2 tsp linseed, 2tsp poppy seed.


My challenge is how to get this mixture to rise and stay up!  I love the mixture of grains but would prefer a loaf of bread, not a cake of bread.

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

It probably would have been good to soak the grains first, especially the kibbled wheat as that can easily tear at the strands of gluten in your bread dough and keep the bread from rising. 

princess_mitzi's picture
princess_mitzi

Ah ha.  No, I didn't soak them.  But I'll try that next time.  Thanks!


 


How long should you soak them for?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Linseed and Flaxseed are the same thing.  Interesting that you split it up.  Is one flour or broken up and the other whole?  I think your total amount of flax seeds is what, 86g?  Recommended,  a tablespoon (8g) of ground flax seed can be exchanged for 10g wheat flour at a rate of 16g per 130g flour (130g-20g so use 110g flour.)   But it is hard to compare because it contains quite a bit of oil.  Maybe reducing the added butter will also help. Hard to say.


I don't own a bread machine but I do know that their recipes must be very exact because they are limited in volume and are running on a timer.  It might be better to take an existing recipe.  


Yeast, I was looking at a similar recipe and it called for only 4g yeast or closer to 1  teaspoon.  I have read where too much yeast causes similar problems of overproofing.


Mini

princess_mitzi's picture
princess_mitzi

Funnily enough but that is the recipe I was going to use until I realised my scales were not precise enough to measure 4g of yeast!!  I think the smallest measurement is 50g on my scales.  Have you tried that recipe?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I don't have a bread maker machine.   That recipe also has a conversion so one can switch back and forth with metric and cups/spoons.  It recommends one teaspoon of Active dry yeast. I'd reduce the yeast first.


Did you use 80g of whole Flaxseed or Flaxflour?  Flour is much lighter.

princess_mitzi's picture
princess_mitzi

I have just noticed the US measurements - that makes life much easier!  I used ground flaxseed.  Thanks for your thoughts - keep them coming!

RobynNZ's picture
RobynNZ

Mention of Vogel's and Edmonds make me suspect you might be. If so, I suggest you look for Simon & Alison Holst's Bread Book (your library may have a copy). My mother died recently and I "inherited" her copy. They have a variety of breads (including multigrain Vogel-like ones) using NZ flours with both bread machine and handmade instructions. The formula are for  bread machines producing finished loaves of 750g. Most of the formula in the book use 3 tsp of Edmonds Surebake. Of course they recommend scaling for machines with different capacities. It would appear from your ingredient list that your finished loaf would be around 450g. So just from that comparison you would need to scale that yeast back a bit.


In the bread machine tips section they say under "sunken top and/or collapsed middle?"  too much water, try 2 tablespoons less, too much yeast try 1/2 tsp less (dough rises too quickly, the collapses before baking ) - Just like Mini O explained above.No salt or too little salt (salt slows down yeast and "tightens" the dough). Room temperature humidity too high - try quick cycle. Well if you are indeed in NZ that won't be your problem yet! Spring is beautiful this year though isn't it.


 


I wonder what kind of loaf you usually make in the machine and what success you usually have. 


 


My quest this year to make a Vogel -like loaf began when they yet again decided not to sell the unsliced version. I am working by hand and have had a great deal of fun experimenting with much more than just a Vogel replica. The library has many of the books mentioned on this site, and of course there is a wealth of experience to be found on the archives here. What a kind and helpful lot these TFLers are. Since finding this site recently my 'bug' has gotten even worse! 


btw where do you buy kibbled wheat?


happy experimenting


Robyn