The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Oklahoma introduction

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beauregard dupree's picture
beauregard dupree

Oklahoma introduction

HellO! What a wonderful resource this site is! I've been digging around for a week-ish and am loving what I am finding. My family is coming to breadmaking from necessity. My partner is allergic to corn in all its forms. ( try finding commercially made loaves without corn in them for under $4 US a loaf. Not happening, even where I live where the cost of living is allegedly lower than a good chunk of the nation.) I have insulin resistance and PCOS. White flour and even wheat are bad for me. But with a family of 4 to feed on a limited budget, we are having to be creative. We have had to banish white flour from the house entirely. Thats my fault. I can never simply -not- touch it. I just have to have a little piece with everyone else. The corn had to go because of the same problem with my partner. We know its bad for us, but if the rest of the family is having it.. then why cant we?? So now my quest is to find lower glycemic index methods and means to keep my family fed.  With a picky 13 year old convinced that the wierd food mom wants him to eat is going to KILL him I've got to find the tastiest means possible. He just doesnt get that he's got all the signs of being pre disposed to diabetes himself. So the end result : I've got to take over the production of the baked goods in the family, even though the prospect is scaring the living daylights out of me. The last time I used yeast was in 1986. I made rolls for 4H in high school. They were good but I couldnt tell you how I did it. I dont remember a thing. Conveniently blocked from my mind. So I'm looking for ideas and I'm grateful for those who have posted their experiences here. I don't feel as lost or alone now. Keep it up everyone!


Beaux

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

What does that stand for?  If it's just diabetes and you're looking for low glyemic foods, try sourdough.  Even white sourdough is low in the GI, so whole wheat would be even better.  But are you trying to be gluten-free?

beauregard dupree's picture
beauregard dupree

PCOS is polycystic ovarian syndrome. In short its a metabolic short circuit that shuts down your metabolism and messes up your endocrine system in its entirety. Most of us who have it end up with an inability to handle simple sugars. But we arent diabetic. At first. left long enough the domino effect of the metabolic messups send us into type two diabetes with enhanced coronary symptoms and autoinflammitory symptoms for the fun of it.


I'm not trying to be gluten free, as many things that don't have gluten in them are -screaming- high in non fiber carbs. I can't have any of that stuff as it pops my blood sugar up which in turn raises my insulin levels by far more than a normal persons would be. My insulin in effect, doesnt work. The high levels of insulin shove all the other hormone levels around and it just keeps going downhill. What i'm looking for is a way to cram as much fiber and protein into a loaf as humanly possible and still come up with something the family will eat. If I keep my blood sugars low, I can keep my insulin levels lower, and over time, they will drop. So in a way, I treat myself like I'm a type 2 diabetic.


I took a look at Peter Reinharts whole grain book at barnes and noble over the weekend. What I am not sure of yet is this: does the pre soaking etc done on the whole grains raise the glycemic index of the loaf? Most of the time  I'm told that anything that " pre processes or pre digests" grains or sugars raises the index. like cooking carrots. Sourdough processes lower it ( is it the acids formed?) but are the processes he mentions giving the same effect as sourdough or the opposite? I just don't know enough about the whole thing yet to tell.


 


Beaux