The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

J.H. Oatmeal Bread

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SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

J.H. Oatmeal Bread

I finally got around to making some of my favorite bread, oatmeal.  I tweaked J.H. Oatmeal bread formula by using KA Organic Whole White Wheat and KA Baker's Special Dry Milk/water instead of regular milk.  The loaves turned out delicious and tender with a lovely flavor.  I will definately be making this bread again and again! 




Sylvia


 

Comments

wally's picture
wally

Silvia,


Beautiful loaves!  I'm thinking a BLT would be great on them.  I've not heard of KA's Special Dry Milk/water.  What's the deal and difference?


Larry

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, Larry!  These loaves make nice sandwiches for the us and the grandkids!  I like the Baker's Special Dry Milk..the water was just added to replace the hydration from the milk in the original recipe.  It is a non-instant non-fat milk specially formulated for yeast bread baking.  It also can give better rise to your loaves than regular powdered milk.  It will increase the protein and calcium in your favorite bread recipes by adding  1/4 cup per 3 cups of flour or you can substitute for liquid milk in a recipe, use 1/4 cup plus 1 cup water for each cup of milk called for.  Regular milk needs to be scalded before using in bread.. because the enzymes can interfere with the activity of the yeast.  Using this product also saves that step and I think that's why it gives better rise and works better than regular instant powdered milk.


Sylvia

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hi Sylvia,


Nice job.  As always.


KA's description of the effects of their milk product intrigued me, so I went to their catalogue's web site to look at their dry milk description, and this is what I found:



Specially prepared for use in yeast doughs; the high-heat processing disables protease, an enzyme that normally slows down yeast growth.



I'm not surprised that the milk powder worked well for you, since high-heat dry milk is the best type of dry milk to use with yeasted breads.  I'm afraid their marketing department has goofed a bit on the explanation, though.


The high-heat treatment (about 190 degrees F, I think) does deactivate a protein fragment that works like an enzyme, but it is "glutathione" -- not protease -- although glutathione has more or less similar effects on dough as does protease.


But, again, the copy writer for this description went further by identifying the wrong target.  The glutathione (and protease, for that matter) weakens the gluten structure -- not the yeast.  I think that "yeast" misconception is a holdover from the days when raw milk had to be scalded just to kill competing microorganisms before use.  Pasteurization of milk essentially eliminates the worry about microbes, but unless the milk is taken to 190F -- instead of only 140F -- the glutathione, though not alive, is still able to weaken the gluten.  A lot of people -- even some expert bakers -- get these two different processes and goals confused.


Incidentally -- fresh milk works just as well as this more expensive high-heat stuff if you don't feel like spending the extra money.  You just need to take it to 190F and then cool it before use.  Pros use the high heat dry stuff despite its added expense because it is easier to store, it doesn't complicate your temperture calculations, and because of the glutathione being already deactivated (saves labor on big batches).  There is no question that this dry product is more convenient -- I use it from larger, more affordable packages all the time.  Individual bakers have to decide if the convenience is worth the added cost.


Also -- sometimes the weakening effects of glutathione can be desirable.  If your dough is too strong and inextensible, using glutathione (you can also get it by using active dry yeast) can make the dough more extensible.  Very handy for baguettes or for sheeting laminated doughs.


I'm pretty sure Jeffrey would be pleased to see your handiwork pictured above.  I think any bread book author would be very, very happy to have you demonstrate their formulas.


--Dan DiMuzio

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hello, Dan!  First I would like to say, Thank you and how I'am very flattered by your compliments! 'Big Blush'.  I love your book 'bread baking' and it has helped me achieve a lot of the bread formula's I bake. 


I consider myself a novice breadmaker who's success is only because I have had the formula written out so a homemaker like me can follow it...I love the 'look and feel' of the dough and that seems to help me the most to know if I'm on the right track for a successful loaf.  


Your information on the KA powered milk was very informative to say the least!  


I keep a couple of brands of powered milk as a staple in my cupboards just for the reason you stated..'convenience'.  This is my first purchase of KA brand and I haven't really used it enough to notice any changes in my baking.


   Sylvia

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

PB & J, toasted fluffernutter and BLT's!! What to have first!!!


Mmm-mmm


Betty

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thanks, Betty!  Mike goes to work early and can eat dinner at work so sandwiches come in handy when I do don't feel like making an early dinner and he's also a toastaholic!


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Truly classic sandwich loaves.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, David! Rolled oats and flour...good old classic staples!


Sylvia

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

These look utterly delicious!


I love the oatbread too! I should make it more often, because I love the soft crumb and the sweetness of oats and honey. Yours look perfect.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, Hansjoakim!  I should have added honey to the staples list...I've just recently stocked up on my local honey.


Sylvia

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Beautiful.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thanks, Floyd!  Something tells me your kids like this kind of bread and dad likes to make it!


Sylvia

chahira daoud's picture
chahira daoud

Oh my GOD !!


I am fasting now Sylvia and it is a real torture to me, I am dreaming of a real sandwich of these wonderful bread !!


A wonderful job Sylvia !!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hello and thank you, chahira daoud!  Nice to see you on TFL, it's been awhile!


Sylvia

CarlSF's picture
CarlSF

Those oatmeal loaves are gorgeous!!!  When I first saw the pictures of your bread, the first thing that came to my mind was either PB and J, toast with butter, or a hearty sandwich.  Now, I am hungry!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you for the nice compliment, CarlSF!


Sylvia

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Recipe, please?


Thank you.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, dwighttsharpe! 


My variation on Jeffrey Hamelman's Bread - Oatmeal Bread


1. 1 lb, 8 oz King Arthur Bread Flour was used and I adjusted adding a little more hydration.  King Arthur All-Purpose flour works well.  Use a High-Gluten flour.


2. 8 oz King Arthur Organic White Whole Wheat Flour


3. 5.3 oz Organic Rolled Oats from my local Henry's Market


4. 1 lb 7.7 oz  spring water   'water has been increased 3.7 oz  because I used  KA special powdered milk' instead of regular milk.


5. 2.4 oz (3TBsp.) Honey


6. 2.4 oz (5 1/2 TBsp) Vegetable Oil


7. .7 oz (3 1/2 tsp. sea salt)


8. .18 oz, IADY (11/2 tsp) instant dry yeast


9. .35 oz  ( 1/8 cup) King Arthur Special Dry Milk Powder


1. Mixing: Place the oats in the mixing bowl.  Add the water and mix in the machine to wet the oats.  Let stand for 15 to 20 min. to soften.  Add all the remaining ingredients to the bowl.  In a spiral mixer, mix on first speed for 3 min.  to incorporate the ingredients thoroughly.  The dough consistency should be moderately loose, with a slight tackiness from the honey.  Turn the mixer to second speed and mix for 3 to 3 1/2 minutes, until a moderate gluten development has been achieved.  Desired dough temperature 76F.  You will need to use cold water that you have calibrated the right temperature.


2.  Bulk Fermentation:  2 hrs.  ( I choose the overnight retarding for more flavor.) I placed the bulk dough in my plastic large salad containers I save from the grocery store.


3.  Remove from refrigerator.  Warmed up for about an hour and then divided into 2 loaves.  Rested for 20 minutes.  Shaped and placed into 2 large 9X5 loaf pans.


4.  Final Fermentation: 1 to 1 1/2 hrs. 76F  or until fully proofed.


When fully proofed, sprayed on a little water and sprinkled with oats and slashed.


5.  Baking:  With normal steam.  460F.  The milk, honey, and oil contribute a lot to bread coloring;  lower the temperature by 20 to 30F after 15 minutes and bake in a receding oven.  30 to 32 minutes....while loaves in larger strap pans will take 36 to 40 mins.  I baked in my convection oven with steam and adjusted temperatures.


Sylvia


 


 

mrfrost's picture
mrfrost

Thank you so much, and sorry if it took too long for me to do so.


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Your welcome!


Sylvia

cake diva's picture
cake diva

I would restrain myself from eating these.  They're just too beautiful to eat!== cake diva

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, cake diva!


Sylvia

ques2008's picture
ques2008

i love the look of your bread.  the crumb also looks like it was baked to a "T"!


i love the way oatmeal adds softness to bread.

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Thank you, ques2008!  Knowing my oven pretty good has come in handy.  The crumb/gluten formation looked great..I thought to many photos so didn't put in a super close-up of the crumb.  My instant read thermometer needs a new battery!


Sylvia