The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Buttermilk Cluster Photos

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beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

Buttermilk Cluster Photos

proofing

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

This was a first time I tried the buttermilk cluster recipe featured on this site.

I did not have fresh buttermilk, so relied on a product from the USA which is a dried powder  that you stir into water.

I was very pleased with the final results and this is one of my hubands new favorites. 

 I scattered some oatmeal and sesame seeds over the top. 

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

This was the first time for this recipe pyulled off of the internet.

While I enjoyed thelook ofthe loaf, I was not happy with the taste and therefore will post post the recipe for other to share.

I do not bake herb loaves often, but will contine to look forone that I can utilize theherbs from my garden, and hopefully enhance the taste of the final product.

I sprinkled poppy seeds over the crust. 

luv2bake's picture
luv2bake

Your buttermilk cluster rolls look awesome!

 I'm sorry your herb bread didn't turn out for you in the taste

dept. Looks nice though. Thanks for sharing your pics.

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Your loaf looks very nice..sorry the taste wasn't there for you. I know it's hard to describe braiding, but I very much like the look! so if you could?? I know you are in Mexico..but perhaps you might look at Floyd's Pain de Provence..it is very good. I don't know if you would be able to find the herb mix though. Welcome to the site!

beanfromex's picture
beanfromex

luvs2bake-thank you for the positive comments on the picture sharing. Nice to "meet"you.

 

Paddyscake-Divide the dough into three equal strands.This particular recipe was enough for each strand to end up being about 26-28 inches long and an inch in diameter. Align the three strands leaving an inch in between, perpendicular to you body.  Start at the tips furthest away from you and about a third of the way down the strands. This allows you to braid up and away from your body, and then down towards your body. This also allows for the strands to remain intact during the braiding process.  Adjust the braid as needed so that the braid is tight without gaps. Pinch the ends of the braids together and turn under . you now have a single braid ( 3 strands) 28 inches long. You then visualize mid point on the braid, and tie a knot, with the dough at that point. Take the braid from the knot to one tip and roll it around the knotted section clockwise, take the outher tip and roll it around itself counterclockwise.. Tuck the ends under.  Good luck, should you have further questions, feel free.

 

re Floyd's pain de provence- I have been casting envious eyes on all breads baked on this site. I will pick up a stone to try and enhance the heat, which heats only to 450F and then seems to drop to 350F no matter where I place the dial. Happily, my husband is happy to eat all failures.  But I may try and lure Floyd and family down here for private lessons...( always resourceful!!)

 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Thanks for the braid directions. It is the final knot of all 3 braids that gives it its unique look. I look forward to trying it! I'm sure a stone will help a great deal. I finally got one and it makes a huge difference.