The Fresh Loaf

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More fun with fougasse - and a lesson learned

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wally's picture
wally

More fun with fougasse - and a lesson learned

Last week I tried Hamelman's fougasse with olives recipe for the first time and had a very happy outcome.



However, in attempting to move the bread onto parchment after scoring it, I nearly had disasterous results, since the scoring leaves it without any 'backbone.' So I resolved to do a bake today avoiding last week's hassles by allowing the fougasse to rise on parchment paper.


Trouble is, I was too clever by half in my approach (as the results of my niçoise olive fougasse below attest).



Here's what happened, and, in retrospect, how to avoid my mistake.


The fougasse (a bread of Provence) goes through three shapings after its bulk fermentation:


1- it's lightly shaped into a ball and allowed to bench rest for about 20 min.


2- it's rolled into an oval shape with a rolling pin and then allowed a final rise for about 60 minutes, and


3- picking up the dough, you then stretch it out to about 1 1/2 times its orginal length, and then fashion it into a triangle whose base is about 1/2 of its length. After that, it's scored and loaded for the bake.


My misstep occured in step #2. I lightly floured parchment paper, and then rolled the boule into an oval and allowed it to rise for an hour. Unfortunately, after an hour resting on the parchment, it effectively glued itself to the paper, which made step #3 impossible. In attempting to scrape it off onto a floured countertop, I severely degassed the dough. Ergo the very, very overbaked (shall we just say burnt) middle of the loaf.


With my second bake - a roasted garlic and anchovy loaf - I smartened up and in step #2, I rolled out the dough into an oval on a well-floured surface - not parchment paper. After the hour's rise, I was able to lift if off the countertop without degassing it, and then transferred it to the parchment paper, where I did the final shaping (#3).


You can see the quite different result below.



I get raves about the bread - it's a bit like pizza without the sauce. In fact, someone suggested that a marinara dipping sauce would be a good accompaniment.


I'm surely going to continue baking this. Hopefully, the lessons learned in this round will lead to trouble-free shaping next time!


Larry


 

Comments

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

That looks like it would be delicious!  Thanks for the tips, too.


Paul

wally's picture
wally

Paul - Thanks!  When it turns out well, it generates a very high ooohhhh factor with it's distinctive form.


Larry

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

I think it would be great for entertaining with a dip. Looks like it would be fun and easy to pull apart. Dave

wally's picture
wally

Absolutely Dave!  You could probably shape this into bread sticks instead of the fougasse shape, but I love the way it looks.


Larry