The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Kitchenaid Architect 6-Qt. Stand Mixer (Model No. Kp26M1Xacs).

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

Kitchenaid Architect 6-Qt. Stand Mixer (Model No. Kp26M1Xacs).

I was just wondering if anyone has used this new mixer. If it's bowl lift, 6 Qt, all metal construction and metal gears, I'm thinking it may be a move in the right direction for Kitchenaid and I'd be interested in one. Any info out there? TIA. Dave

suave's picture
suave

As far as I can tell this model number matches "Professional 600" mixer.  Nothing new about it.

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

Ok thanks. The ad said it replaced the 600 pro.

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

the model number is not even on the ka site yet it must by very new


 

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

are often "store specific" numbers. Costco's version of the mixer is likely to have a different model number from the standard version's, for example, even if the machines are identical. This often makes comparing machines when shopping for price and features somewhat annoying since you can't alway be certain you're comparing the same item.

Pjacobs's picture
Pjacobs

Norm,


I hope the new KA is a direct drive all steel. I'm on my 3rd KA 6Quart in 2 years, the first two have failed within the warranty period, fortunately. I have only had the new machine about a week and I have made bread-3 loaves at a time--twice. So far, so good. I can only hope they finally got it right.


Phil

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

2 loves of my challa bread takes 1 pound 4 -5 oz of flour and it is pushing my 5 quart to its max 3 loves would take 2 pounds of flour and thats bread flour and would overload the 5 quart mixer. i don't know how much flour you were using but the "14 cup " limit stated is for ap flour mixing something like cake or cookies. i am not sure but i think that a 6 qt mixer would not hold much more than a 5 qt mixer.


see my longer post below

Pjacobs's picture
Pjacobs

Norm,


I forgot to mention,Kohl's Department Store replaced the first two machines without question, so my only gripe, if you will, is that using speed 2 as directed, I still had to go through the inconvenience of making the 100 mile trip to make the exchange. They should be making a heavy duty mixer that lasts. If this one crashes, I'm seriously thinking of a 20 quart Hobart once I come to grips with the weight of the beast.


Phil

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

The current state of the KA mixer when it comes to durability is nothing but sad.  It must be cheaper to replace the many that break than it is to simply make a quality mixer in the first place.  KA, for the most part, seems to replace mixers quickly and without question.


Possibly you could find an old, little used Hobart made KA as they have proven longevity and durability.  Of course there is no telling what kind of life the mixer may have had before you get a hold of it.


If durability is something you are looking for then I would look beyond the newly made KA no matter what fancy name they give it or claims they make about its construction and durability.


Jeff

cake diva's picture
cake diva

I just made Leader's Pane de Genzano recipe that Janedo wrote about a while back.  The process calls for the wet dough to be kneaded at medium speed for ~10 minutes, then at high speed for another 10 minutes.  There is no way that I would have been able to make this bread with KA.  As it is, I use my HObart N50's medium setting (mixer was already jiggling quite a bit), then proceeded to the high setting for the last 10 minutes.  I tell you it was the longest 10 minutes of my life.  The mixer turned an entire 180 degrees, and you could tell from the sound the machine was just cranking, but it made it!  I don't have the book, but I don't know what machine Leader had in mind to do this recipe with.  It would certainly be a lot of elbow grease if one were to do this by hand.-- cake diva

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

All i can say is the n50 is a small model of the big bakery mixers i have used all my life.


No mater what the book says in a 3 speed mixer bread is speed 1 only. The other speeds do not have enough tork for bread.  You might get through a danish dough which is very soft on speed two but i would not make over 1.5 pounds of flour of danish in a 5 qt 3 speed or 10 speed mixer.


1.5 pounds of my onion roll dough is pushing a n50 to the limit and thats on speed 1.  1 pound is more like it.


i don't know how big a dough you were tring to mix but if it was over 1.5 pounds of flour you are over loading a n50


my 15 year old ka 5 qt home mixer is still going strong remembering it is a 1 speed mixer with a varyable speed motor which means it has a fixed tork.  speed two for bread is as fast as you can push it with 1.4 pounds of hi-gluten flour making a egg bread and 1 pound for the onion rolls more flour or a higher speed and you will burn out the motor.  since there is no cluch to burn out something has to give ether the motor or breaking a gear or a shaft.


to all that want to go beyond thouse limits in home baking you would have to speend about 1000.00 for a 10 quart small pro mixer or the 12 quart hobart.  even then in a three or 4 speed mixer speed 1 or 2 is as fast as you can go for bread and 3 to 4 pounds of flour depending on how stiff the dough is.


respect the mixers limits and it should work for years.


just for example i would make 75 pounds of flour 2 or 3 timws a week for onion and kiser rolls. the mixer used was a hobart 140 qt mixer the bigest planatary stand mixer they make. the dough never whent over speed 1 and the mixer would shake the floor. once i shifted it into speed 2 the mixer moved about 6 inches on the floor it took 4 of us to move it back and two days for my ass to stop hurting after the boss ripped me a new one saying that if it wase'nt for the mixer moving i would have burnd out the cluch.


again respect the limits of the mixer you have and it will do fine

cake diva's picture
cake diva

nbicomputers,


The violent shaking and sounds coming out of the Hobart N50 at speed 3 while I was mixing the wet dough validate your admonition not to take the crank up the setting beyond the lowest.  I want my mixer to last me a while.  When the recipe says to increase the speed to medium-high for 9 minutes, then high for another 9, how does one compensate at speed 1?  Will longer knead times do it?


Thanks for the advice.  Probably saved my mixer.  --- cake diva

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

could you post the formula ?  once i see it i would know how soft or stif the mix is.


running at low speed for a longer time would sonner or later give the same results but seeing the formula would help


some doughs like my bun dough which is a med soft dough.  I  mix it for 15 to 20 minutes at speed 2 with a hook while danish mixes with the flat beater.


remember speed 3 is for whiping cream and egg whites with the wire whip there is not enough tork for anything elce. 

cake diva's picture
cake diva

HI!


I have the formula and process written up in my blog just published 5 minutes ago.  It is entitled" More Life is...."


Thanks so much for your interest.  I appeciate any advice I get.--- cake diva

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

this is a clear case of over loading


the formula in whole between the starter and the final amount of flour is close to 1 KG


i would est about 2 pounds U.S flour plus the addition of VWG and the use of a hi gluten bread flour will push the n50 to the max.


keep it at speed two for a longer time and try cut the formula down to .75% of the amounts posted and you should be fine.


i make a soft sweet bun dough for cinnamon rolls and other sweet dough products with about 500 Gm of flour and mix it till it comes clean from the mixer as you do.  at speed two it takes about 25 to 30 minutes to be ready.

cake diva's picture
cake diva

Nibicomputers,


I redid my Pane de Genzano just now using Bertinet's slap-stretch-fold technique (Idea from ehanner) after the first 10 minute mixing with the Hobart N50. Just took the bread off the oven and it didn't seem to have suffered from the process modification. Thanks to Eric and your advice. --- cake diva

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

I'm using a friend's K5SS and it seems to be well made, but I find it powers out during the kneading process. I was doing a batch of PR's basic SD so it shouldn't have been too much as it was only 4.5 - 5 cups flour. I'm hoping the newer machine would have a little more torque. Dave.

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

5 cups of flour can weight between 1punnd 4 ounce and 1 pound 8 ounce and if the dough is tight (stiff) that would push the mixer to the limit. i have had my 5 qt stop dead in it's tracks with 1 pound 8 oz of stiff dough.


did you also account for the flour in the sour dough starter in the 5 cups?  if not than therte was more than 5 cups of flour in the mixer and that would overload the mixer of that size.


 

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

I did not take the starter into account. I was definately over 6 cups then. Dave

qahtan's picture
qahtan

Have you looked at this machine,,,,,, qahtan


http://www.everythingkitchens.com/electroluxvideo.html


 


 


 

L_M's picture
L_M

Hi all, It's been a very long time since I've posted here, but I've been following along. I use a Kenwood Chef but kneading the dough in our hot summer in Israel is almost impossible - even if I start with ice water and flour straight from the freezer I end up with the dough being too hot and it always turns into a sticky mess. When I use the french fold or stetch and fold methods, for some reason I just don't get the volume I like in bread. As far as I have heard the DLX should be a good solution for me, but so far I've searched the internet for hours and hours and I haven't been able to find even one source in Europe to purchase from. Does anyone here from Europe own one? All ideas are welcome! L_M

JohnDough's picture
JohnDough

I am the friend whose K5SS Dave  Nomadcruiser53 had been borrowing. I am sorry to say Dave will not be returning. He passed away last week of a embalism. I know he enjoyed this site immencely and had become a avid baker. He would wish to thank you for all the help he had received here.


 

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

This is terrible news. In the few months he was here, he was an active part of the forums and will be missed. 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Please accept my condolences and relay them also to his family.


Betty