The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello World

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Pimple's picture
Pimple

Hello World

Hi everyone,


 


Having just registered a couple of days ago I thought I should introduce myself. My name is Henrik, I'm 22 years of age and I'm Danish. I'm a third year apprentice baker, currently at baker school but I'll be returning to the bakery in some six weeks or so. I chose this profession not because I necessarily want to work as a baker indefinitely, but because I have an interest in baking, especially bread though most things interest me in varying degrees. I'm also interested in programming, though it hasn't been my main occupation for the last couple of years.


 


And of course, I'm here to nick all your tricks about bread baking! And because I like the idea of an online bread baking community :)


 


-- Henrik B. N.

Jw's picture
Jw

I like forward to a few apprentice contributions as well. Baking bread has a lot in common with programming!


Cheers,
Jw. (not a programmer)

Pimple's picture
Pimple

Hehe well, I'm beginning to think I have little to contribute, in the way of bread at least. My idea of a good bread and what I'm taught seems to differ alot from what I see around the net. For instance, if you show me a slice of bread with holes in it, I tend to think it's a mistake if it isn't a particular kind of bread supposed to look like a swiss cheese on the inside! I can't for the life of me see what's so good about holes.


 


I also get an urge to throttle those who make or speak well of no-knead bread recipes. Thankfully though, none are within the reach of my arm, or I'd soon find myself behind bars. So I'll just grab what ideas I can agree with and add to my collection of voodoo dolls when I see something I don't :)

dustinlovell's picture
dustinlovell

Hi Henrik. I, also, am new to the forum.

Isn't the important thing that the forum is furthering the craft of baking bread and the love of baking in general? You are an apprentice baker - congratulations. However, why is it that simply because your learned methods are different than some that forum members espouse, then their methods are wrong? I only recently was able to succeed in creating a sourdough loaf with big, irregular holes. I was ecstatic. The crumb was attractive and the mouthfeel was great. If I want completely uniform bread, I can find it in any supermarket. If no-knead bread works for some people, why the disdain for their efforts? Who are we baking for anyway?

If you have already decided which methods you'll agree with, why bother joining the forum at all? My intent in writing this is not to start an argument. I am honestly intrigued by your comments.

Best regards,
Dustin Lovell
Amateur Baker

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Well said, Dustin. A.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

I'd like to welcome you into the site, Welcome!


So you don't think you have something to contribute?  Rookie problem...  You will soon get over it.  There is more to life than just baking bread... there is eating it, and comparing it (watch out for odious comparisons) and just having fun being creative in and about the dough.   There can be deep social action too.  Whatever direction the interests go, so goes the bread of life. 


Now for a contribution.... cough it up!  ( But only when you're ready.)   As a young apprenticing baker (holes aside) do you also learn what foods go best or ballance with particular flavors of particular breads?    When a customer comes into your bakery and wants suggestions to say, a summer barbecue, what suggestion would you make?


Mini O

Pimple's picture
Pimple


Isn't the important thing that the forum is furthering the craft of baking bread and the love of baking in general? You are an apprentice baker - congratulations. However, why is it that simply because your learned methods are different than some that forum members espouse, then their methods are wrong? I only recently was able to succeed in creating a sourdough loaf with big, irregular holes. I was ecstatic. The crumb was attractive and the mouthfeel was great. If I want completely uniform bread, I can find it in any supermarket. If no-knead bread works for some people, why the disdain for their efforts? Who are we baking for anyway?


If you have already decided which methods you'll agree with, why bother joining the forum at all? My intent in writing this is not to start an argument. I am honestly intrigued by your comments.


Best regards,
Dustin Lovell
Amateur Baker



I have not reached some bread baking nirvana and decided I know better than everyone. I only meant to comment on what strikes me as odd. It's a big world out there, I can't see it all from under my rock! But I have to say, should you want "completely uniform" bread, you still can't find a good one in the supermarket as yet!


As for no-knead, I just can't appreciate the technique. If it "works" for some people, good for them. I still think I'm entitled to my own opinion about it though. And it seems to me the technique came to be out of laziness rather than there being an advantage to it. If there is any advanage particular to bread you don't knead, I'd like to know at any rate. But that aside, it doesn't mean I won't munch the bread ;-)



Now for a contribution.... cough it up! ( But only when you're ready.) As a young apprenticing baker (holes aside) do you also learn what foods go best or ballance with particular flavors of particular breads? When a customer comes into your bakery and wants suggestions to say, a summer barbecue, what suggestion would you make?


Mini O



Sadly, no! Well, you get an idea what sort of thing each type of bread is typically used for, like rye bread's traditionally used for 'open face sandwiches', rolls for breakfast, pastry ... also for breakfast oddly (but hey, it sells). But what flavors go well with eachother in bread is something I'd like to get a better feel for. And if a customer wants suggestions for a summer barbeque, I would suggest something like the breads on this site: http://www.grillguru.dk/forum/viewtopic.php?f=42&t=8399&start=0


But only because I know they're popular for the occasion..

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

Hi Henrik, just had to say that it wasn't laziness but curiosity that made me try the no knead bread. I hadn't baked bread for years and when a friend sent me an article about the method I was intrigued. That was almost 3 years ago and here I am, old enough to be your grandmother and a confirmed breadaholic! One thing led to another and then The Fresh Loaf, and I might never have ventured into this wonderful craft if not for no knead bread. Then there are people like my son who will probably never make anything but no knead, or in his case Almost No Knead bread. He is happy and his friends think he is really cool - and they are eating good bread. A.

Pimple's picture
Pimple

And I'm sure it's much to prefer from buying it in a supermarket :)


But I didn't mean to imply you're lazy if you do it, not at all. It's not what I wrote either. I just think its only benefit is to skip some steps in the process which, for me, is no benefit in the first place as I like what's being left out. Which is fine if you're curious about it, as a first step or if you just want to make bread without getting too much into it.

yozzause's picture
yozzause

Hi Henrick, welcome i have done my apprenticeship as a baker in 1 of the better bakeries in Western Australia and worked in a number of different bakeries as a tradesman for 10 years i am now out of the trade and have been so for 30 years.
I still have a love of bread and baking, and in my current position (purchasing) for a technical college I still get time to visit our Hospitality training area which has a small Bakery and find nothing nicer than rolling my sleeves up and getting stuck in with the trainee chefs learning bread making skills.
Being recognised by the instructors as a person with KNOWLEDGE in this area is great.
However i must say that since joining TFL I have been in awe of some of the contributors and the things they are trying, never to old to learn and always willing to try something different.
I have visited a number of overseas bakeries on holiday and been invited into a few and spent whole evenings rolling up the sleeves and joining in. Maltese bakers were facinated to watch me hand up using 2 hands with 2 dough pieces where they used two hands with 1 dough piece. end result was the same, and watching the inspection of the handed up dough was great to watch.
What i didnt learn at college and my workplace was to make these different breads that are different from all over the world, and something that i am enjoying exploring right now, even breads with large holes and extra long fermentation periods.
There has been a revival here in Australia of small bakeries that are producing some wonderful alternative breads that are being appreciated for their difference.
I have still to try some of the ideas that put forward here on this forum and hope to do so they may or may not work for me, but the fact that someone is willing to share their ideas with is exactly what i am seeking. VIVE LA DIFFERENCE

Pimple's picture
Pimple


VIVE LA DIFFERENCE



Exactly! By the time I graduate I'll still be a newbie in many ways, among colleagues as well. The bakers I work with go around saying the first 30 years are the "worst" (meaning that around then you start to get the hang of it). It's just a saying of course, but I don't think I'll ever get bored with baking. Every country has its way of doing it, and even in a country as small as my own you can see differences in bakeries from town to town, in technique, taste and what not, even though they all came to the same school to graduate.


We sell these rolls in my bakery - apparently they are made in bakeries on the northern tip of Jutland. The idea was brought some 100km south and here carry a name that says where it came from. I don't think these are to be found on the shelves of the bakeries just 50 km south. Thinking about that tells me there will always be something new to see, you've just got to find it :)



Being recognised by the instructors as a person with KNOWLEDGE in this area is great.
However i must say that since joining TFL I have been in awe of some of the contributors and the things they are trying, never to old to learn and always willing to try something different.



And that's exactly why I've begun using the site as a resource. There's alot of good inspiration to be found here =)