The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

DLX mixer...

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qahtan's picture
qahtan

DLX mixer...

Quote


Submitted by Mati on August 11, 2009 - 6:59pm.
Electrolux from Kodiak's

Hello qahtan;

I just saw your posting while searching for Canadians who have purchased this mixer. I also live in Ontario and I am considering ordering this mixer from the U.S. I am concerned though about custom charges. A dealer in Winnipeg sells this mixer, but the price is very high.

I would appreciate any information you can share with me.

I hope you are enjoying your mixer,

Thank you,

Mati

end of quote

  I have just looked into theprice of DLX mixer in 

Canada    $899  ,,,,,,,,,,,, Nothing said about shipping cost.

 US          $569............ This company I bought my DLX from , NO tax No Shipping to Canada.

 Import duty $151...................

 

 

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Ouch! A hefty price for a kitchen tool. I have been sitting here thinking about all that I have learned about mixing minimally and the absence of kneading recently. I think I'm coming to the conclusion that I don't need a mixer at all. Certainly at the prices I would have to pay in Canada. Even $569. is a lot to pay for something I don't use every day.


I used to think I had to knead by hand or machine until the dough was developed. Then I let it ferment for a few hours, undisturbed. Now I know if I fold a few times during the ferment time I can skip the kneading altogether.


I'm not to proud to admit I fell into a trap. Now will I abandon my precious DLX totally and forge ahead by hand?


Eric

MJO's picture
MJO

Eric,


Thanks to you, I no longer use my mixer either!  Just fold a few times and let rest and fold another couple times and presto!  No kneading, no mixing.  Even with 100% WW.  My bread is better than ever!  I'm going to send you a picture of the last loaves--their incredible.


Peggy

qahtan's picture
qahtan

 


  Eric, don't be a tight wad. ;-))))


 Just remember you can't take your money with you, so enjoy it now.... :-))) ;-)))


 qahtan

ehanner's picture
ehanner

This used to be my motto back when I was a consumer. Now that I'm retired, I can look down my nose at such nonsense. :>))

phxdog's picture
phxdog

Here's how I justified spending hard earned scratch on a DLX . . .


I seldom use a set of sockets or wrenches, but when I do I sure enjoy the feel and craftsmanship of a quality set of tools. Same thing with cars; I can get most places I have to go in my '72 Gremlin, but I would rather get there in a new BMW (have not made that leap yet!).


The point is, some things, while maybe not the most cost effective, pay-off in other ways, mostly metal or Karma or whatever. I guess I'm weird that way. 


The store-brand loaf of bread that I can the buy at the grocery store for under $2 will work for sandwiches, sopping up gravy, etc. But I choose to make my own bread at a substantially higher cost (when you consider the cost of your labor). The difference in quality (and the work itself) make me smile. I guess everyone on this forum is weird in THAT way!


Scott (Phxdog)

Mati's picture
Mati

Thank you Qahtan for your reply.


I phoned Canada Border Services Agency and they told me that mixers imported to Canada do not pay duties (even if they have been manufactured in Europe).  I would only have to pay GST and PST. If this were the case and even with the exchange rate, this would be a good price compared to what I would have to pay if I bought it in Winnipeg.


Kodiak is now charging $40 -$50 US for shipping to Canada.  I'll give them a call anyways.


 

loydb's picture
loydb

Sounds like there's a lucrative career in moving mixers across the border! I just need a truck with some fake-panel walls, and I'm set! :)


edit: p.s. I love my DLX, you won't regret getting one.