The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

glucose

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erg720's picture
erg720

glucose

greeting everybody. my name is ron.


i'v wondered, does anyone here try to mix glucose with any bread's formula? in tiny portion of course.


does?


 


ron

suave's picture
suave

What would be the point and purpose?  Glucose is a fermentable sugar and yeast will quickly consume it.

erg720's picture
erg720

I just thought like in icecream etc...


it might give the bread some of his unic elasticity.


anyway, i'll try and report. 



Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I have never heard of any one mixing glucose into bread...in any amount. 


Of course there are countless events that take place in the world that I am unaware of and this could be one of them.


Jeff

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Corn syrup is mostly glucose, I think.


Some bakers use it as a sweetener.  The syrup is an invert sugar that helps bread retain moisture even better than crystaline sucrose (like honey or molasses can also do), but I don't think it imparts any magical qualities.


--Dan DiMuzio

erg720's picture
erg720

As far as i know. inver sugar is not glucose. But yes i do talk about the moisture.


Glucose is more sweet then simple sugar (130%). We can barely feel it in product.


Anyway, as I said,  I'll try it myself and then...


thanks

SteveB's picture
SteveB

If I remember correctly, invert sugar is a mixture of glucose and fructose (the two saccharides that are obtaind by cleaving the disaccharide, sucrose).


SteveB


http://www.breadcetera.com


 

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

I checked my copy of Figoni's How Baking Works, 1st Ed, and you are correct -- glucose syrup is not an invert sugar.  I do apologize for my mistake.


She also explains that crystaline glucose (also called dextrose) is less sweet than crystaline sucrose.  Is that what you mean by "simple sugar"?  Or are we using some other standard?  The powdered sugar on donuts is usually dextrose, though it can have brand names applied like "Arctic Snow."


Anyway -- I can confirm that some bakers use corn syrup as a sweetener.  When the honeybees started dying off in large numbers back in the late 90's, honey went up in price astronomically -- and it was never cheap.  Some of our breads then (Big Sky Bread Company) had around 20-25% honey as compared to flour weight in a formula.  We bought it in 55 gallon drums.  After the price got scary, lots of bakers started using corn syrup as a substitute.


Talking about honey in large barrels reminds me that if you ever have to clean up a 7-foot wide puddle of honey -- quickly and efficiently -- from your kitchen floor, I can give you tips.  Don't ask me how I know.


--Dan DiMuzio

erg720's picture
erg720

I'ts O.K  .


The simple sugar that i ment is exactly what u said: crystalline sucrose.


 


ron

venkitac's picture
venkitac

I hope I never have to do this, but now I really have to know:) How do you clean a 7 foot puddle of honey!?! (One method I can think of: get a few bears, (plenty available here in california), lock 'em up in the room, come back a week later:))

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Use a dustpan as a scoop and scrape up most of the honey from the floor.  Use a mop to get the residue.  I think I did it in 10-12 minutes one time.


Then don't let your boss find out about it.  That's probably 15-20 bucks worth of honey -- maybe more.

venkitac's picture
venkitac

Hi Dan, seems like you had to do it more than once, too:) Thanks for the tip.