The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hello. I'm Madeleine.

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Madeleine Wilson's picture
Madeleine Wilson

Hello. I'm Madeleine.

Hello The Fresh Loaf community.


This is my first post but not my first time on the site; Been following you guys for a few months (this appears a common thing to happen) and have been slavering over my keyboard at the wonders I see! Not only does your baking look great but your tips, creativity and enthusiasm is inspiring.


I've been trying to make my own bread for probably a year now. It has not gone well. My loaves always looked good on the outside but when I cut into them...yuck! so doughy! as if they had no air inside (even after they'd atleast doubled) or hadn't been in for long enough but they'd been in ages. Now looking back I think the oven wasn't hot enough. If I remember rightly I was doing them on 180 degrees...seems a bit absurd now. I bought a bread machine and they turned out good but I really felt like I was missing out on all the fun. I found out about sourdough starters and when looking about for recipes I was directed here. What an enlightenment! I tried some sourdoughs and they were good but my poor thing died after a month from neglect... I wasn't sure how long they survived without feeding and was away for a couple of days. It did NOT look healthy when I got back. Since then, after being inspired by Richard Bertinet's technique on the 'Gourmet' website (was posted on here), I've used fresh yeast, put my oven up a notch and have had fun experimenting with satifying results, of which I'd like to share some images but am still to learn how to do that.


I guess that is all until I can do that actually... Could someone tell me please?


I look forward to sharing this lovely past time with you all


Madeleine


in Dundee, Scotland

Floydm's picture
Floydm

Welcome to the site, Madeline.


I think the photos FAQ has the clearest instructions on how to post photos.  There are many different ways.  Hopefully one of them will work well for you.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Good to see you here. Here is the FAQ for how to post images.


I think it is easiest to post the images at a storage site like Photobucket and then copy and paste the image URL location into the little green screen as noted in the FAQ above. This is one of those things that we all have had to get through and once you do it it will seem simple. You can send me a message if you have trouble with this and I'll try to get you started.


I look forward to seeing your work.


Eric

Ford's picture
Ford

You say "My loaves always looked good on the outside but when I cut into them...yuck! so doughy! as if they had no air inside (even after they'd atleast doubled) or hadn't been in for long enough but they'd been in ages. Now looking back I think the oven wasn't hot enough. If I remember rightly I was doing them on 180 degrees...seems a bit absurd now."

I take it you are asking how to correct the doughy - under cooked interior of the loaf.  I suggest you us a thermometer to test the interior temperature.  It should read 195 to 200°F (91 - 93°C).

I usually start baking at 450°F (232°C) with steam, (Pan of boiling water under the shelf, and occasional spritz of water on the loaves and walls of the oven) then drop the temperature to 350°F (176°C) and remove the pan of boiling water.


Ford

jemar's picture
jemar

Nice to see another Brit. on here!  My husband is from Dundee but 'emigrated' down to Wales many years ago!  We have something else in common, both of us are less experienced in bread-making than many on here and I also follow Richard Bertinet's method because it works so well for me.  I attended a course of his in Bath last year and find his way of 'working' the dough, as he describes it, works better than any other method I've used.  Do you have his books, DOUGH and CRUST?  You would find them very helpful as they include DVD's which show his methods in detail.  You may find them in the library if you can't buy them.  Hope you find this helpful.

Salome's picture
Salome

When kneading by hand, I often knead the same way as bertinet. I just think the dough turns out smoother than with other methods. So experienced today again, when I baked a 100 percent whole-wheat bread, which had a wonderful dough to handle.


Welcome Madeleine, I'm sure you're going learn a lot being on here! Myself, I'm still in the process, too.


Salome

KJM's picture
KJM

Hi Madeleine,


I am also from Dundee, though currently living in Netherlands after 10 yrs in Canada. I was back 'home' 2 weeks ago and was thrilled to find a specialist cheese shop - perfect for your bread! Sorry, off topic, but I just wanted to say Hi to a fellow Dundonian. I don't see many Brits on this forum. I read about a baker in Kirriemuir who had some press a while back - can't remember why - have you heard anything locally?