The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Tom Cat's Semolina Filone

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SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Tom Cat's Semolina Filone

I just received my book 'Maggie Glezer's Artisan Baking' and was looking at the recipe and photos of this bread.  I have been wanting to make this loaf ever since David 'dmsnyder' told me how wonderful it tastes and it's his favorite semolina bread.  He also has the recipe and photo's on his blog.  I have made a few breads using the Semolina and Duram flour'. I love breads made with Duram wheat!


This bread is absolutely delicious!  I love the golden creamy color of the crumb!


I mixed completely by hand.  Baked the loaf on preheated stones...for 10 mins. under my largest dark blue enameled roasting pan...I have 3!


 




Balsalmic Glaze and EVOO.  with tonights roasted chicken dinner.


Sylvia 


 

Comments

ehanner's picture
ehanner

What a beautiful loaf of bread. Did it crack open or was it scored slightly? I can't get over how nice it looks.


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hello Eric,


Thank you for the very nice compliment!  I tried scoring with my razor one long slash..it dragged and caught on the wet dough..so I just did the best I could slashing very shallow about 1/4".


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I generally don't like "fluffy" breads, but this one's an exception. It should have been great sopping up the roast chicken juices.


This slack dough needs a long mix in a machine to develop the gluten in my experience, and durum flour is supposed to be easy to over-mix. What technique did you use for hand mixing, Sylvia?


I'm also curious about the sort of enamel pan you have that will accommodate such a big loaf. Could you give the dimensions and, maybe, a photo?


Great job!


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hi David!  So far I have never over mixed my semolina/duram..I know it can turn to mush in an instant if over mixed!  I made this recipe the other day.  I used your blog recipe 'until my book arrived' and mixed using the Pain de Tradition method...just as an experiment to see how it would taste...the bread tasted so wonderful...the only problem was I tried it without adding any extra flour...the dough was very hydrated...but I thought I would give it a slash anyway..and of coarse the side of it fell over...but still didn't affect the lovely flavor...we ate the whole thing!  I'll post a photo along with the pans.


This loaf I added 3 TBsp. extra KAAP flour.  What a difference the dough was much easier to form and handle.  I used the hand mixing method discribed in the recipe in MG Artisan Baking.


By hand: Combine the flours and water and knead this stiff dough until fairly smooth.  Cover with plastic wrap and let rest (autolyse) for at least 15 minutes but preferably up to 1 hour..I rested it one hour and kept the dough cool..under 75F...


Sprinkle the yeast over the poolish, stir it in, and let it stand for 5 minutes.  Add the poolish to the dough and knead the two together on an unfloured work surface until very smooth, about 10 minutes.  Use a dough scraper to help you manipulate the dough.  Sprinkly on the salt and continue kneading until the salt is dissolved.



First attempt.  Using the Pain de Tradition mixing method..no extra flour was added..the dough was very hydrated and would have been better, I think just left unslashed.  The taste was wonderful.



I used the pan on the far left..It has handy side handles and is 16"W on the inside measuring and nearly 5" deep.


Sylvia


 


 

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I have an oval roaster like those, but I've never seen one 5" deep!


I'll have to look at Glezer's hand kneading instructions.


David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

David,  It is a very large loaf!  My turkey roaster in the middle is about the same depth...I've had it for as long as I can remember!  I think I found the one on the left in Walmart..a couple of years ago,  but Im not sure..it did not have a lid..but the little pan on the far right makes a lid on it perfect..just no handle for the lid..unless you turn them over.


Sylvia

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

I am a huge fan of Maggie Glezer's book and this recipe is my all-time favorite.  It's probably the recipe I've made more often than any other bread, and it always comes out beautifully.  I don't use a pan, but just bake it free form on my stone.


On this subject, I was wondering if anyone knew if the Glezer book "Artisan Baking Across America" (a hardback) is the same as the glossy-paged paperback called simply "Aritsan Baking." From what I've seen on Amazon, they seem very similar, but I haven't been able to tell if they are actually one and the same book.


 

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hi, Maggie!  It's easy to see why this bread is so popular!  Because the loaf is so large for just the two of us..I will make it next time in two loaves..it would also make lovely rolls for sandwiches.  I believe this recipe is also in MG 'Artisan Baking Across America'. 


Sylvia

suave's picture
suave

yes, for all practical purposes it's the same book.

Bixmeister's picture
Bixmeister

That bread makes me hungry.  I love dipping fresh bread.  Looks great!

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hi, Bix!  Thank you!  I would also like to thank you for the info on the gardening planters I found on your Kamado post.  These will also come in handy with our new watering regulations!  I'am going to order the set of 3..maybe in time for some fall veggies!


Sylvia