The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Osmotolerant & active dry bakeoff

  • Pin It
venkitac's picture
venkitac

Osmotolerant & active dry bakeoff

I made my fruitcake recipe with SAF Gold (osmotolerant) and Fleishmann Active Dry to see whether osmotolerant yeast makes a difference. The recipe has 15-18% sugar in it. The results are literally like night and day. I used 2% of the SAF Gold, vs 3% of the active dry. SAF Gold was ridiculously fast, in fact I've to cut down to 1.5% next time, bulk ferment was done in barely 1.5 hours, vs 4-5 hours with the active dry yeast. The difference was amazing. I did a bit more research on this, and it seems like below 10% sugar levels, it doesn't really matter which yeast you use (i.e osmotolerant or regular instant/active dry). But once sugar levels go above 10-12% it begins to make a difference. And now I can vouch for it..

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Thanks for the info.  I've ordered some to try in my Danish pastries.  That's the only sweet thing that I make at this time and I've certainly had rising issues a couple of times.  I'll be interested to see the difference.


:-Paul

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hi Paul,


Not that it's any of my business, but were you having rising issues with the Danish that you made from my book?  I'm here to help if that's the case.  Well, actually, I'm here to help in any case.


--Dan DiMuzio

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hi Dan,


I created the issues myself, in the learning process.  I have active yeast, not instant as you call for in the formula.  I've tried it different ways - the first time I tried activating the yeast in the small amount of water and ended up with a thick paste, which was difficult to dissolve in the warm (soy) milk.  [soy milk, by the way is made from soy beans, there is no dairy involved].  It actually worked quite well.  The next time I dissolved the yeast in warm soy milk and it worked almost too well - lots of rising in the 'fridge even.  The next time I tried cold soy milk and that didn't work well at all, but then I didn't let it ferment before refrigerating it anyway.  This last time I used warm soy milk again and let it ferment an hour (like the instructions say - duh!) before refrigerating and it worked fine.  So all my issues are self made.  I'm an experimentalist.  By the way, a poolish seemed to work as well as a wet levain to me.  I didn't have any starter around and so I made a poolish instead.  I did find that the straight method, with neither starter nor poolish was more difficult to roll out.  Lately I've been wondering about leaving out the sugar and trying it as a savory puff pastry.  Since I mangle the recipe so much I don't feel like I can legitimately cry for help.  It's fun to play with and the Danish has become a staple around the house.  The neighbour's apricot tree is dumping fruit all over the ground so I've been gathering them up and boiling them down for filling.


:-Paul

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Well . . . good.  It sounds like you aware of what's happening there.  I don't blame you for just trying different things.  If you don't mind the occasional dead end, that's the fastest way to learn.


In terms of puff pastry, you might want to start with a different dough formula.  The technique for the beurrage and lamination is essentially the same as for danish or croissant, but you'll need twice as many layers (more or less) to get any leavening, and the danish dough was never intended for that.  Also, puff is traditionally made with just flour, water, and a pinch of salt in the dough -- no milk, eggs, sugar, or yeast (obviously).  Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volume Two has a good formula and procedure, starting on page 118.  There's also a sort of mock puff pastry that precedes it in the same chapter, but that's cheating, right?  You should notice that the butter block is about twice the size (proportionately) as with croissant or danish dough.  You need that much butter to make six turns.


You might want to use a genuine all-purpose flour (not KA's) with protein of only 9-10%, and don't develop the dough before lamination as much as you do for the danish.  Six sets of turns is a lot -- too much gluten or too much development makes that difficult.


Since you can't use a levain or poolish in puff pastry, I thought I'd pass along a tip from someone I know.  You can still get the advantage provided from protease activity in a liquid levain or poolish by just mixing flour and water together in equal weight -- NO SALT -- and letting it sit, just like a poolish.  With the AP flour, you might not need that sort of strategy, but if you decide that the dough was not extensible enough, you can use that technique the next time.  Just add the remaining flour and salt to complete the dough the next day, keeping in mind that you don't want overdevelopment of the base dough.  Hands work about as well as a mixer here.


Good luck with that.


--Dan DiMuzio

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Thanks Dan.  I was just sort of free-thinking, I don't really even know what a puff pastry officially is.  I appreciate all the information.  It's amazing how much there is to this baking stuff.  You can certainly go as far as you want to.  The amount of information on this site is totally overwhelming.  Thanks for your interest.


:-Paul

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I have been waiting for your results. Glad to see you made it work as advertised. My test must not have had enough sweet in it. Nice post, thanks for the follow up.


Eric