The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread flour ash content

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BreadJazz's picture
BreadJazz

Bread flour ash content

I am interested to know the ash content (55, 60, 65) of the Robin Hood Best For Bread Homestyle White Flour. I need this to determine how much water I need to arrive at a good fermented dough.


 


Anybody knows?


 


 


Thank you,

themightytwix's picture
themightytwix

I am very interested as well!!!

LindyD's picture
LindyD

to contact the manufacturer and ask.  I Googled the brand and found a toll free number you can call.  Link


Search engines can be quite helpful.


You might want to visit The Artisan for more information on the classification of flour.

BreadJazz's picture
BreadJazz

Thank you,


 


Very informative. The Artisan site is a mine of information.


 


 

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Is Robin Hood a Canadian brand?


--Dan DiMuzio

BreadJazz's picture
BreadJazz

I don't know if it is a pureley Canadian brand, but I bought mine in Canada.

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Robin Hood (the brand name) is owned now by Cargill, from what I can tell.  They didn't disclose any flour specifications at their web site for retail/grocery flours (now you know why I like King Arthur flours) but they do have an information request form here:


https://www.foodemailtracker.cargill.com/FOOD/fisemailtracker.nsf/emailformExt?OpenForm&sectionId=501861


When I was  kid (about a century ago), you could get Robin Hood at any grocery in Cincinnati, but I haven't seen it commonly in the U.S. since then except around northern New England.  I had heard it was very common in parts of Canada.


In case Cargill isn't helpful, most Canadian hard wheat is spring wheat, so if it was milled from that it should show characteristics very similar to King Arthur's bread flour, which is also milled from hard spring wheat.  Very strong, very absorbent.  But you should request info from Cargill.


--Dan DiMuzio

Yumarama's picture
Yumarama

 


From this info sheet (PDF format)


http://www.horizonmilling.com/recent_announcements/Docs/FAQ.pdf


 



Q2: Are Cargill and CHS buying the Robin Hood brand?

A2: No. Cargill and CHS are acquiring from Smucker Foods of Canada those assets that directly support Smuckerís grain-based business with foodservice and industrial customers — specifically, three flour milling operations, two mix plants and a product development facility. Cargill and CHS also are licensing the rights to the Robin Hood brand for use in foodservice and industrial channels. Smucker Foods of Canada is retaining ownership of the Robin Hood brand and will continue to distribute Robin Hood products in all retail channels. Horizon Milling G.P. will co-pack their Robin Hood brand retail products.



 


So it would seem Smuckers Canada still owns the Robin Hood brand, as well as Five Roses and Monarch, and hence the top three brands in the country. Cargill is getting the rights to supplying the industrial side. So that bag on Robin Hood on the grocery store shelf is still under Smucker's name.

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

may you help me to find information how to make bread in indonesian bakeries ?

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the best place to find European style breads were the bakeries of the big international hotels in major cities.  Go there and find out who bakes their bread or if they have an in-house bakery that you could tour.   In what part of Indonesia are you located?  

Mini

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

a few years ago i had worked for a small company which was working for DSM . DSM  is the best comapny for enzymes and yeast etc etc . but my problem is not about making normal bread. i can make german turkish and georgian bread. but i need to know how indenosian people makes bread in theişr country. when i can learn the way . then i can prepare a special enzymes combination for the addition. my answer is very important for the company i work

kenny10099@hotmail.com's picture
kenny10099@hotm...

 

this is very complecated issue. first of all. if the ass is low then the flour has higher quality. but this is all about mill process. for example if they cant optimize the starchy damage or cant make the water its temperature  under control of the process equipments then the ash content will be so much. if you really want more info. i can type you more. but you had better use german or french source for this. because german and french technogy is the best for all flour. 

Ash Content

USA

(14% Moisture)

France

USA

(14% Moisture)

France

USA

(14% Moisture)

France

 

 

 

 

 

 

0.40

0.48

0.55

0.70

0.83

0.65

0.41

0.49

0.56

0.67

0.71

0.85

0.42

0.50

0.57

0.68

0.72

0.86

0.43

0.51

0.58

0.69

0.73

0.87

0.44

0.52

0.59

0.70

0.74

0.88

0.45

0.54

0.60

0.71

0.75

0.89

0.46

0.55

0.61

0.73

0.76

0.90

0.47

0.56

0.62

0.74

0.77

0.92

0.48

0.57

0.63

0.75

0.78

0.93

0.49

0.58

0.64

0.76

0.79

0.94

0.50

0.60

0.65

0.77

0.80

0.95

0.51

0.61

0.66

0.79

0.81

0.96

0.52

0.62

0.67

0.80

0.82

0.98

0.53

0.63

0.68

0.81

0.84

1.00

0.54

0.64

0.69

0.82

0.85

1.01