The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bäcker Süpke's Joghurtbrot

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hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Bäcker Süpke's Joghurtbrot

Wolfgang Süpke is a German baker whose blog, Bäcker Süpke's Welt, I've been trying to keep up with. In the blog, Bäcker Süpke has most generously posted several recipes for some of the mouthwatering loaves his bakery makes. Both Nils and Jeremy have baked gorgeous Süpke-loaves, and Jeremy even did an interview with the German Bäcker.


September last year, Süpke put up the recipe for his Joghurtbrot, and this week I thought I should give it a try. You'll find the original recipe here. I pretty much followed the directions to the letter, apart from swapping the yeasted pre-ferment with a firm levain. It's a 70% rye dough, with 28% flour in a rye sourdough, and 15% in the white levain. Here's the fully proofed dough:


Joghurtbrot


The recipe was spot on hydrationwise, and the dough was nice to work with. Here's the finished loaf after just under 60 mins in the oven:


Joghurtbrot


And here's a shot of the crumb:


Joghurtbrot


I really enjoy the loaf! It's not very heavy for a 70/30 - the crumb is open and soft. There's a notable sour bite in the thick crust that I particularly like about it. The yogurt, at 15% of the overall flour weight, contributes a very subtle flavour note. As the rye and sourdough taste will become more pronounced in a day or two, I bet it'll be more like a standard fare Bauernbrot, but with a bit paler crumb.


My hat off to you, Bäcker Süpke! Thanks for the recipe :)


This week's dessert is another of Bo Friberg's cakes - a chocolate chiffon cake with rum-flavoured buttercream. If you're not too big on either chocolate or rum - or the combination - settle for the strawberry below. If you, like me, love both, then 2+2=5, and this would be up your alley. It's especially good if you let the slice come to room temp. before eating - the soft chiffon and buttercream both have that melt-in-your-mouth quality.


Chocolate chiffon cake

Comments

ehanner's picture
ehanner

What a wonderful looking Rye!
I am having a little trouble printing my translated version of the recipe.


The recipe is a 3 part formula. The sour portion, a Hebel (leverage) which must be a preferment with salt and the dough. I  want to try this next week. I like his suggestion for seeds. Thank you for the inspiration on this.


Eric

nova's picture
nova

Hans and Eric,


how does one get a translated version of the formula?? I am so glad to hear that the reader can...


oh, Hans...


you are definitely one of the baking stars of this website!  The bread is lovely and the dessert, well, what can I say.  Did you ever look for the Cake Bible? not that I think you need to: just curious.


I baked Hamelman's Horst Bandel's bread last nite.  Oh my goodness, what a comedy it was...I was very careful to NOT add all the water the formula called for (12.8 oz, I added only 10.0), let alone the soaking water...but what a soppy dough it was.  So I added more high gluten flour, and then some more, and then some more.  The original formula called for 8.0 HG flour...I must have added at least 4 more oz...the dough looked better, so I stopped and went to bulk ferm.


  I loaded the dough mass into my 12 x 4 loaf pan (I do not have a Pullman with a sliding lid), covered the pan top with sprayed foil and let the proofing begin.  The dough completely filled the pan to the top.  After about 30 min, I noticed a strange central doming occurring.  I pulled back the foil and dough was leaking up and over,  down the side of the pan! So, I grabbed a 12 inch chef's knife and started sawing the top of the proofing dough from the loaf pan, leaving the rising dough even with the pan's top, re-floured the dough's top, and replaced the foil...with another 30 min to go.  The excess dough was put in  a mini-loaf pan and covered with foil, as well.  ABout 15 min later I returned, and the same spectacle repeated itself in its entirety...Dough down the pan's side, me sawing and scooping the excess from the 12 inch pan to the mini-loaf pan, refloured and re-foiled both pans.  The mini-loaf pan now had a two inch deep even layer of proofing dough in it.


With 5 minutes proofing to spare, I looked at both loaves...the mini-pan was proofing very actively, and decided "Into the oven, NOW!!!".  I secured the foil by carefully folding corners at the end of the long pan, and allowed for about a 1 inch ceiling above the pan and dough.


The loaves went into a 350 oven for about 1 hour, and then the temperature descent began, at first to 250.  By the way, the oven spring of the large loaf did completely fill the excess foil I left, but the foil held! After 5 hours, I turned the oven down to about 200, and then 170.  At midnite, I turned the oven off.


At 6:30 this morning I retrieved both loaves.  And, since I still am unsure about uploading photos (my resolution dimensions need to get trimmed), I can't show you the photos....the large loaf looked really good despite two beheadings!! And the miniloaf was entirely respectable in size, eveness.  When I weighed both loaves, the mini-loaf weighed one third the weight of the large one.  I had removed one quarter of the proofing dough from the long pan!!


The things we go thru for the love of Rye...Don't forget about the translator....


nova


 

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Boy... what lengths do we not go for the things we love? ;-)


Before I forget: Google has a translation tool that (at least sometimes) can give meaningful translations of foreign websites. You'll find a link to the tool from Google's front page. Here's a link for the translated version of Süpke's Joghurtbrot: Click here. I hope the translation makes sense, and don't hesitate to ask if anything's not clear! By the way, "Anstellgut" means "mature sourdough culture", and Süpke is using fresh yeast in the formula (divide by 3 or 4 if you'd like to use dry instead). "Anstellgut" is such a cool word... Oh... hehe. Check out the bit just below "Leverage" (which, of course, is the yeasted prefermented white dough): "Dough 2 hours and then jump onto the fridge". That's not the preferment pouncing on your fridge. It should read something like "Leave at room temp. for 2 hours, then stick it into the fridge".


Oh, and your pumpernickel travails, nova. Truth be told, I've never baked the pumpernickel myself, so I can't give any precise advice regarding the recipe. But I have heard about others who also found the dough to be overly wet... then adding flour to compensate (which results in a larger dough that will expand more than was initially expected). Your situation sounds similar to that described by Susan at wildyeastblog.


I'm not sure if I can give you much in the way of detailed advice... One idea could be to skip the soaked old bread - making Pumpernickel without the stale bread soaker is certainly not unheard of in German baking circles. For a specific recipe, there's one here (Google-translated version here).


Thanks for the advice regarding the Cake Bible! I don't have it yet, but I read on Beranbaum's website that she's putting out an upgraded version of the book in a couple of months time. September I think it was. I'll hold out until then!

nova's picture
nova

Hans,


The first pic is a crumb shot:



U can see that the bread is more open at the top than the bottom.  Clearly, this is where the pullman lid is so critical...the loaf stays compressed thruout the bake.  Next pic is slices...please note the title...



Your suggestion about the soaked bread...well, probably not the best route to take.  This is why:  the aroma as I opened the stored bread was so heady and very much due to the browned and soaked old Vollkornbrot.  I have never had anything remotely similar to the flavor and fragrance of this bread except a fruitcake I used to bake 10-12 years ago: it was called Arkansas Christmas cake.  I could not remember what was in it until I looked it up last nite;  the recipe called for 1.5 Cups of sorghum molasses.  So between the caramelization of old browned bread, the molasses in the formula and the 15 hr bake that caramellized the entire loaf...what a remarkable experience.  And the bread stands up to everything: butter, peanut butter, yogurt cheese...even Swiss cheese!!


My solution for the next bake is add NO water at all, and start mixing, then carefully dribble in bit by bit.


I will check out the link you sent for the translator and thanks for offering to help with translated confusion...


I am starting a sprouted wheat-tart cherry bake tomorrow including soaked cracked spelt...should be good.


Thanks, Hans...until my next rye or spelt adventure....


nova

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It looks fantastic.


--Pamela

nova's picture
nova

Thanks, Pamela...I have been obsessing about making this bread since I got Hamelman's book at the first of the year.  It is a labor intensive loaf but worth every bit of it.  I also think a larger Pullman with a lid will also help the next loaf...


nova

apprentice's picture
apprentice

Horst Bandel's bread was also my first obsession in JH's book. You've done a superlative job. Will just mention to be careful about going into too large a Pullman pan. The instructions are to place a 4.4 lb. loaf in a lidded pullman pan. I thought there must be only one size, since it wasn't specified, the size I had at my disposal at baking school (16x4x4).


Later discovered on another page of Bread that Chef Hamelman uses a pullman sized 13 x 3 3/4 x 3 3/4 (sometimes called a pain de mie pan). The dough was lost and vastly over-proofed in my pan by letting it rise to within 3/4" of the top. Fell like a concave stone during the long bake. A tasty stone but still a stone.


Fortunately I redeemed myself before the school year was finished. And learned a valuable lesson besides. Glad to have the chance of passing it on!

nova's picture
nova

Apprentice,


funny you should mention the 16 x 4 vs the the 13 x 4 Pullman....I was using a 12 x 4 pain di mie pan when my first attempt (with the extra flour) proofed over the sides.  My second attempt was quite successful with holding the water back (almost all the way back!)...but I put the dough in my new 16 x 4 Pullman...and I experienced the same:  it proofed within 3/4 inch to the top.  After 16 hours in the oven, I saw the loaf baked to about (it really shrank) 1/2 the height of the pan!  But the taste is excellent and the loaf quite moist.  I did look thru Hamelman's book to see if he was specific about the pan size ( he was not with the Horst formula write-up)...and guessed wrong.   Guess I will have to make again...just to get it right. 


Will send a photo when all the pieces fit together.  Thanks for the compliment and understanding the obsession!


nova

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

Can you tell us some about the whole process. What's in the loaf. Do I see barley?


15  hour bake, WOW!


Oh, never mind. I see the original posting above.


Betty

ehanner's picture
ehanner

A very fine loaf here Nova. This bread is a learning experience I suspect but I am encouraged by your effort.


Eric

apprentice's picture
apprentice

Hi Hans, a quick note to let you know that RLB's next cake book is out now: Rose's Heavenly Cakes. But it's not an upgraded version of The Cake Bible. If you're keen on exploring patisserie further along the bread (my two passions, for sure!), keep your eyes open for a remaindered version of The Cake Bible. I picked up an inexpensive 2nd copy this year, because my old one was falling apart. Have been baking from it for 11 years, and I still haven't exhausted everything there is to learn in its pages.

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Hi apprentice,


Thanks for the advice :)

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Beautiful rye bread and dessert combo. The crust on the rye looks esp. inviting. I'm not a big fan of chocolate but the way you bake might make me believe 2 + 2 = 5.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Oh my gosh! Hansjoakim, I just showed my husband some of your blog..he kept saying OOOOH gosh, my favorite dessert...when looking at the desserts..he loves sweets..Oh, look at...look at that...look at that bread..what kind is that...: )


Now he's hungry, I have to go feed him...we are going to a buffett!


Sylvia


 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

superb! Wish we could sample some of your fare.


Betty

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Thanks for the kind words, everyone!


Eric: Do give it a go! The flavour is quite mild the first day, but I find that both the rye and sourdough flavours become more dominant over time. Many of Süpke's recipes are based on rye sourdoughs paired with a yeasted, white preferment (often a "salted poolish"; a 100% hydrated pâte fermentée). The combination is supposed to improve the dough characteristics and give the loaf a longer shelf life. Anyway, once you're all set to mix the final dough, everything happens very rapidly, and the loaf hits the baking stone merely 90 minutes later.

Brotfan's picture
Brotfan

hansjaokim, this looks wonderful. The bread reminds me of all the German Bread I can't get living in the US. I'd love to give this one a go but I'm scared of all the kilos of flour. Baecker Suepke doesnt say how many loaves his recipe makes - and also I'm terrible at math. What formular did you use. And Komplimente! I've followed your blog for a while and everything you make is beautiful. Kirsten

hansjoakim's picture
hansjoakim

Hi Kirsten,


And thanks for the kind words :)


As long as you don't have a large household, Süpke's recipe needs some scaling. I have a spreadsheet that I use to get the numbers efficiently - here are the quantities that I used for the 1 kg loaf (as the one in the post above):


Rye sourdough


Medium rye flour 155 gr


Water 155 gr


Mature sourdough 8 gr


 


Yeasted preferment


Bread flour 83 gr


Water 83 gr


Yeast (fresh) 0.2 gr


 


Final dough


Bread flour 83 gr


Medium rye flour 233 gr


Water 105 gr


Salt 11 gr


Yeast (fresh) 8 gr


Yoghurt 83 gr


Sourdough 318 gr (all of the above)


Yeasted preferment 166 gr (all of the above)


 


Some remarks: If you'd like to use dry yeast instead of fresh, divide the amount of fresh yeast by 3 or 4. As you see from the yeasted prefermented dough, there's only supposed to be 0.2 gr fresh yeast in there. To approximate this, you can do the following: Dissolve 2 gr fresh yeast in 150 gr water. Then add 20 gr of this mixture to the flour. Then add 63 gr pure water, and mix to a smooth dough.


Finally, since all 318 gr of sourdough is used in the final dough, you might want to make some more ripe sourdough, so that you can perpetuate the culture. You could e.g. mix 170 gr each of medium rye flour and water, and add 10 gr mature sourdough starter. That would give you a total of 350 gr ripe rye sourdough. You can then use the 32 gr leftover sourdough to keep the culture going.


Best of luck!

Brotfan's picture
Brotfan

Hi Hansjoakim,


thank you so much for spelling it all out. I think a one Kilo Loaf will be plenty for us! I think I too will use some stiff levain instead of the preferment. I guess I just have to make sure it adds up to the same amount.


As soon as I have my new digital scale I will try this out. So far I always used my measuring cup - the "Pi mal Daumen"-method. It's time to be more accurate...


I will let you know how my Joghurtbrot turned out!


Kirsten