The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Cloth Bread storage bag?

avatrx1's picture
avatrx1

Cloth Bread storage bag?

I'd like to be able to store my bread for a few days without putting it in plastic and not just leaving out on the counter face down.  Could someone suggest the type of baker's bag I've seen referred to in some discussions on bread storage?


I thought - perhaps - I'd make one.  Put a little monogram or embroidery on it letting the troops (family) know that it's specifically for my bread.


I'm just not sure what type of cloth.  lightweight Muslin perhaps?  If it worked out - then maybe I could personalize them and sell them  to subsidize my bread habit.................


-Susie

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Susie,


My daughter brought a cloth bread bag back from Cote d'Ivoire for me after she spent a summer there.  It's an off-white color, heavy fabric.  Looking at the weave, it might be a twill, sort of like denim, although it's about the same weight as a light canvas or duck cloth.


Hope that helps,


Paul

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Something like that ought to be pretty easy to sew up! Sort of like a miniature laundry bag. Sounds like a good idea. I have a couple of ripped open flour sacks. I might try sewing one back into a bag and putting a draw string on it. It would probably make a great storage vehicle for SD breads. 


--Pamela

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Susie,


Here's a photo of the bread bag my daughter brought back from Cote d'Ivoire:


bread bag


The finished dimensions of this bag are about 9.5 inches by 27 inches.  Note the sewn-in handle.  I suspect the shape has to do with the strong French influence; i.e., lots of baguettes and batards.  The printing on the bag is backwards, not the photo.


Maybe Eric could post a pic or two of the bags his wife makes for some additional ideas.


Paul

ehanner's picture
ehanner

I embedded a link in my post above about the bags. I'll do it again here.


http://mary-dondero.livejournal.com/610.html


Eric

flournwater's picture
flournwater

("I embedded a link in my post above about the bags. I'll do it again here.


http://mary-dondero.livejournal.com/610.html")


Those are actually better used for shopping bags.  My wife makes those "designer" shopping bags too.  Bread bags are much less complicated, as "xaipete " pointed out, and the images provided by "PMcCool" are what bread bags actually look like.

avatrx1's picture
avatrx1

The other page posted with bag photos are lovely bags, but yours is more along the lines I was thinking of.  Perhaps with a name embroidered on it and a "redwork" loaf of bread?  Redwork is an artwork picture done in 1 color.  not necessarily red.


All of the input gives me something to go on.  I do sew and making a simple bag would be fairly easy.  I thought perhaps  with a draw string closure that could also be used to hang up your bread from a pot rack or something.?


 


Thanks everyone


-Susie

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I like your draw string idea, Susie.  I've got the muslin cloth so I'm gonna talk to my wife about making me one with a draw string. 


I'd never heard of "redwork".  Both my wife and daughter would be interested in that sort of thing.  I'll let them share in the task of making the bag. Mom can make the bag and the kid (well, not a kid anymore) can to the needlework.

AnnieT's picture
AnnieT

I just delivered a sourdough boule in a cotton bag with a drawstring. I chose a country style fabric (thrift store find) and used a French seam so that it can be washed without ravelling. It was quick to make and now I suppose I should make one for myself - it would be neater than the teatowel covering the loaf on my breadboard, A.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Avatrx1,


Some shameless self promotion here. My wife makes these bags for a variety of purposes. She started making them for an alternative to using paper or plastic shopping bags at the store. Every time we go to a friends where we take bread, we use a bag sized for that purpose. We have used her bags for picnics, and a cloth bag protects the crust from being damaged. If you have sewing skills I'm sure you could find a way to make bags.


As for a cloth bag keeping bread fresh. There does seem to be some slowing of the staling if the bag is closed, about like if you drape a cloth over the loaf on the counter. I find that works also.


To expand on this subject. The seasonal change in ambient moisture is the constant enemy of the bakers crisp crust. All winter the air is drier and thus the crust stays crisp longer. During the warm summer Months, a nice crisp crust that has been dried in the oven after baking will begin to turn chewy and tough in a couple of hours. Sadly, I don't know of a practical solution for this dilemma. You can use a plastic bag after cooling but eventually the moisture creeps out and the crust gets chewy. I use paper bags or cloth and accept the limitations of the environment. Air conditioned buildings are a big help as the moisture is removed during the cooling process.


Eric

jemar's picture
jemar

For some time now I have been using this method for keeping my bread fresh and it seems to work for me .  What i do is cool the bread completely then wrap it in a clean tea-towel, which I keep just for this purpose.  I never wash this cloth in a soapy solution, just very hot water so it is not contaminated by a soapy smell or taste.  I then put the package into a plastic bag, just one that I bring from the supermarket for weighing out fruit or veg., nothing fancy!  The bread keeps for as long as it lasts ie. until it's eaten, which is sometimes as long as 5-6 days.  Since using this method I haven't thrown out any mouldy bread.  I hope this is of interest to some.

flournwater's picture
flournwater

That's the way I do it.  Works just fine.

avatrx1's picture
avatrx1

If you go onto any embroidery site and type in "redwork" designs, you'll see what redwork is.redworkthis isn't a bread one, but it will give you an idea.  I embroider using my Designer 1 sewing machine.


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I also have a Designer 1. What a great idea to embroider a bread bag.


--Pamela

avatrx1's picture
avatrx1

hello xaipete,


Let me know if you come across a good design for a "bread" design.  I thought the redwork would be the easiest and the classiest.  No fru fru - just simple.


-Susie

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I will. Do you have the hasp and 3D/4D software?


--Pamela

Barbara Krauss's picture
Barbara Krauss

There is a plastic-lined cloth bread bag for sale on the Breadtopia.com website.  They have both round and long sizes.  I haven't bought them, so I can't vouch for their effectiveness.

peterson00000's picture
peterson00000

Hi,


 


Goodpost......I really like this finishing bag design......Is it made in cotton material...?


http://www.boardwise.com/

leocwa's picture
leocwa

I bake 3 loaves at a time and freeze 2 since I am the only one in the house this bread last me for about a  month. But I do have a Mould problem . This happens to the loaf I been using which for a week or so,Usually the heel of the loaf, the bread holds up well stays soft otherwise. I have been just sticking the rest of the loaf in a plastic bag and twist it shut, Now the Idea of wrapping it in a towel then placing it in a plastic bag I will try sound good.I tried spritzing the plastic bag with Vinager, or peroxide seems to help some, dosen't have any effect on the taste.I live in the Texas Hill country high humidity. Leo

Bee18's picture
Bee18

Hi Leo,


To keep your bread clean of mould the best thing is to keep it in the fridge. If it's a loaf, it will keep fresh longer than a baguette. I also use a bread bag that I bought from a Backery, it's made with a thick linen.


Bread is good and fresh only the day you bake it. Out of the fridge or the freezer you have to toast it or to warm your oven to high temp. then to put your bread in for few minutes no more, and of course not straight out from the freezer. To make the crust of the baguette to come back to it's crustiness use a brush dipped in water and brush over the surface, before warming in the oven.


Plastic bag keep humidity and make the mould growing rapidely out of the fridge, bread bag or kitchen towel let the air circulate and the bread dry naturally. 


General advice : a loaf is good several days, a baguette 1 to 2 days max. Look at the French : they buy their bread twice a day from the baker....


hope these advice will help you, from a French Bee

naschol's picture
naschol

When bread is kept in the fridge it dries out quicker than being left on the counter, but does help with the mold problem for that reason.  However, freezing seems to help keep it moist longer without the mold problem.  What I do, if I make a large batch, is to slice the bread before freezing.  Then, it is fairly easy to pry or break a slice off of the loaf half an hour or so before eating.


 


Nancy

Bread Buddy's picture
Bread Buddy

Is there a way to determine the grams of fiber in a whole grain formula?  I don't know how to calculate this but if anyone can help it will be someone here.


Thanks.

Bread Buddy's picture
Bread Buddy

Does anyone know how to calculate the grams of fiber in a multi-grain bread formula?  I would really appreciate being able to this if someone knows.


Thanks.