The Fresh Loaf

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Hamelman's 40% Rye - without commercial yeast

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Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hamelman's 40% Rye - without commercial yeast

Hamelman's 40% Caraway Rye without commercial yeast:




I haven't cut into this yet, but I'm so pleased!  I modified the recipe and only used the rye levain.  It looks great.  This bodes well for paying attention to fermentation temperatures.


I cut the recipe down to make a single loaf:


Rye Sourdough:
dissolve together
8.5g ripe starter
150g water
mix in
181g Giusto's whole dark rye flour
It makes a putty-like starter.  Let ferment 17 hours at 70F.  I floated the container in the bathroom basin with 70F water.


Next day:
Dissolve rye starter in 151g 105F water
Mix together:
265g 12% protein bread flour
7g Giusto's Vital Wheat Gluten (to approximate 14% protein flour)
8.5g salt
8.5g caraway seeds
Combine dry and wet and knead vigourously for 10 minutes.  Dough was initially sticky but soon came together and was easy to knead without any flour on the counter.
Ferment at room temp 90 minutes with two stretch and folds
Life intervened with a Dr. apt., so dough to 'fridge for 2 1/2 hours.  Upon return dough is domed but not doubled
Ferment an additional hour at room temp, altogether doubled from the beginning now
Lightly degas and form into a batard.  Proof on parchment at room temp for 2 hours
Sprinkle with caraway seeds, mist, and slash
Bake 460 with steam 15 minutes, peek in the oven and jump up and down, bake an additional 20 minutes without steam


I'll post a crumb shot once I've cut into it.


:-Paul

Comments

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

That looks really good!


The rye flour you used is quite tasty. I use first clear flour for the wheat flour in this type of rye bread.


Waiting to see the crumb and, most important, how you like the taste, etc.


David

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hey David,


Your tireless rye boosting has been very encouraging.  The taste of this bread takes me back to being 6 years old and I enjoy it with the abandon of a small child.  With my baguettes and boules I've been disappointedly searching for what we, here in my home, call a "'frisco flavour" - that mythical, extemely assertive sour, but this rye is absolutely satisfying.  Now I want to make it a few times to imprint the process.


Working with that rye starter was different and very appealing.  I think I'm going to dry my other starters and put them away and just maintain a rye starter to use for everything for awhile.  I want to learn about caring for it.


Thanks for your posts and encouragement.


:-Paul

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

What a beautiful loaf of rye bread.  I love the way you sprinkled the caraway seeds on top of the loaf.  Can't wait to see the final results...really nice looking loaf, Paul!  Oh, great recipe writeup..almost forgot..I got so carried way looking at the photos!


Sylvia

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

A beautiful and delicious looking rye. Can't wait to see the inside.


weavershouse

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Thanks.  After the BBA Pumpernickle that came out looking like the flying saucer from The Day the Earth Stood Still this was particularly gratifying.



:-Paul

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Paul, your loaf look beautiful. I can't wait to see the crumb shot. Your scoring is perfect too.


--Pamela

Bixmeister's picture
Bixmeister

Great looking bread, Paul.  Eventually I would like to make a rye bread so I will keep your recipe handy.


 


Bix

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hi Bix,


I think I said tha same thing about rye bread two weeks ago.  Now I'm worried that this was beginner's luck.


:-Paul

salma's picture
salma

That is a fabulous looking bread.  I look forward to reading the TFL post everyday and then I cannot make up my mind which bread to try.  Scheduling is one factor and the other is, how much bread can you eat!  I usually give one away and my friends, who I asked them to critique my breads so I can bake better, love everyone of them.  Fortunately, all the recent breads have been more than just edible.


Paul, I think you are the one who posted the cherry bread with fresh fermented cherries.  I had the cherries and went to work on them.  The bread came out pretty good with a nice crumb, except that I didnt taste the cherries.  I added pecans.  It was very good with a little honey on it.  I usually think about it but dont put in my 2 cents.  So here is my official thank you!


Thank you also to TFL for this wonderful learning site.


My last try was 'My daily bread', to which I had to add almost a cup more of flour.  I made the bread on Monday and I ate a piece (again) just now and damn! it is sooooo good still.   I could not shape it.  I put it in two little heavily floured baskets and then dumped it out on the stones.  What stuck a little, actually formed nice ears.  The bread didnt look very high but has beautiful holes and I feel its almost a cross between a foccacia and a ciabatta.


Sorry to be rambling on and I dont even know if this is the thread for all these comments but all you guys are my teachers.  Thanks so much.


Salma

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Hi Salma,


I found tha same thing with the cherry bread.  The fruit kind of got lost.. pretty subtle.  The idea came from the Fermented Apple Loaf in the Joe Ortiz book The Village Baker.  I had better luck with pears and peaches so far as flavour goes.


Keep rambling.  I'm a rambler too. 


:-Paul

Pablo's picture
Pablo


Crumb is pretty nice.  But the taste!!!  OMG if I were to buy a loaf of rye bread with caraway seeds, this is EXACTLY what I would want.  I hope that I can reproduce this.  Wow.  My mom was Jewish, maybe it's in my blood, incredible.  Just dead-on hits my caraway rye button.  It's in the toaster now for a late breakfast with over easy eggs.  My goal for today is to toddle off to the little market and get some pastrami for sandwiches with my favourite Hebrew Deli Mustard.  I'm blown away.  There may be other joys that higher percentage ryes can show me but the bar has been set.  This is great.


:-Paul

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Looks like I just got here in time for the crumb post...looks fantastic..you wrote just what I was so happy to here...I'm a real caraway fan in my rye bread! Oh, Yes, now are you sorry you cut that recipe in half?


Sylvia

Pablo's picture
Pablo

YES!!!

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Looks incredible, Paul. You've definitely got a winner there! Great job; you've definitely raised the bar for the rest of us with this loaf.


--Pamela

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Maybe paying attention to fermenting temperature paid off. Maybe that IR thermometer will really help. I hope this isn't like some fishing story - the one that got away...
:-Paul

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

I think the only bad thing about the IRT is it can't be carried around in the shirt sleeve pocket!


Sylvia

Pablo's picture
Pablo

quick draw shoulder holster...

xaipete's picture
xaipete

This will work but you definitely have to get larger pants Paul.



Uncle Mikes Police Accessories Open Style Inside-the-Pant Holster

 



http://www.amazon.com/Uncle-Mikes-Inside-Pant-Holster/dp/B001B70XS0/ref=sr_1_19?ie=UTF8&s=hi&qid=1247696018&sr=1-19

Pablo's picture
Pablo

I was already pricing muumuus


:-Paul

xaipete's picture
xaipete


Extracted from a blog:

Vote Mumus for Men
*As time goes on, and my belly grows and falls, I start to long for a mumu. You know, those one piece garments women wear, that covers EVERYTHING , and still allows you to move. But, mumus are still a fashion faux paux for men, at least in this country. However in Africa, they're all the rage! If they catch on, I envision NFL mumus, all black mumus, leopard print mumus, and mumus with messages on them like t-shirts. Imagine the space you'd have to work with! You could print whole manifestos for the world to read. What about camo-mumus? Keep those deer guessing, as to why that bush is moving. 

*If you think cargo pants are hot because of all the pockets, can you imagine a cargo mumu? We're talkin' pockets that hold groceries, or your lunch, or a case of diet coke.

* But then comes winter, and the problem with all mumus/dresses, are those pesky, ice-cold drafts that blow up and threaten your nether regions. Fear not! Enclose the legs like parachute pants, and you've got a fashion double hitter: A mumu-parachute style! From there you can make them out of wool, or fill them with down. Hmmm, warm mumu.

--Pamela

 

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Pamela, when I first read this, I read "I envision NFL mumus..." as "I envision TFL mumus..." and I thought "Dang! Someone's on this aready!"  - Team TFL, Danish Division


:-Paul

xaipete's picture
xaipete

You are a rare bird (I mean breakfast snail), Paul, with such a wonderful sense of humor. In case you haven't figured it out yet, I would do almost anything for a joke. I'm so easily tempted. You seem to be of the same ilk.


--Pamela

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Nice!


Yippee

Pablo's picture
Pablo

Thanks Yippee. :-Paul

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Paul.


Just a couple things to say:


1. Your crumb is perfect.


2. Your reaction to tasting it is perfect.


This is the bread for which I started making bread again. I missed it so badly.


There is no substitute for a perfect, caraway-seeded light rye. It is one of western civilization's triumphant achievements. 


I would encourage you to explore the world of rye further. I'm sure you will find breads you like, and you will inevitably learn new skills (after some equally inevitable frustrations) when you tackle high-rye doughs.


But this bread stands alone. It is literally incomparable.


Welcome to the rye bakers' club!


David

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

I'm happy for you. The crumb looks perfect.


weavershouse