The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Hamelman Mutigrain Levain

Steve H's picture
Steve H

Hamelman Mutigrain Levain

This bread came out pretty good.  I might have wanted a little more tang from the sourdough.  That said, this bread would make some mean rolls.





Also topping with seeds didn't really work out.  They just fell off.

subfuscpersona's picture
subfuscpersona

I find this the easiest way to get seeds to stay on the dough. Basically, the seeds are applied at the beginning of the final proof. A light misting of water helps the seeds stick to the dough.


Here are more detailed instructions...


> Sprinkle your seeds on a rimmed baking sheet.


> When the dough is shaped for the final proof, lightly mist the top and sides with water.


> Gently place the dough, top side down, on the seeds and (for batards) rock it back and forth or (for boules) rotate it.


Let the loaves proof (in a banneton or on the bench - whatever you do) and bake as usual.


I use this method for small seeds such as poppy or sesame. Doesn't make a mess and the seeds stay on the bread (as you can see)


SOURDOUGH SESAME SEED / SPELT BATARD


soudoughSesameSpeltBatard


Your bread looks like it has sunflower seeds on top. Don't know if the above method would work for this larger, heavier seed, but it is worth a try

Steve H's picture
Steve H

I might give wetting the dough a try, or better yet, using a smaller seed.  I think that was probably the problem...