The Fresh Loaf

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090704 - Yippee's German Sourdough Rye 'Brick'

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Yippee's picture
Yippee

090704 - Yippee's German Sourdough Rye 'Brick'

There must be a more proper name for this loaf, but it looks like a brick and feels like a brick, so I named it 'brick bread'.  The idea came from a loaf I once tried out of curiosity.  There was a night-and-day difference between that loaf and the fluffy, buttery Hong Kong /Japanese style breads I grew up with, but its texture was certainly interesting.  I'd been contemplating making it but was not able to find a formula either here at the forum or online.  Therefore, I decided to make it up myself after researching the basic properties of rye flour and using the ingredients on the package as a guideline.


My loaf consists of 60% rye flour, 40% high gluten whole wheat flour.  The loaf I had was a yeasted formula and was made with far more variety of flours, seeds and grains but I decided to simplify the ingredients in my first trial.  It has only walnuts, raisins and topped with sesame seeds.


I activated my dormant rye starter and put it to use.  In order to test its vitality, no commercial yeast was used this time. 


I arbitrarily picked an 88% hydration (to Cantonese, 88 is also a lucky number), hoping that this will soak up the pentosans and they wouldn't interfere with the gluten development as much. Even so, the dough was still sticky and a bit messy to handle. I made a sponge overnight and mixed with the rest of the flours the following day.  A few attempts of stretch and folds didn't seem to lead to anything promising, so I gave up.  I folded in the nuts and raisins at the end.


The dough rose to about 65% of its original height after a few hours, I wasn't sure whether it was ready but I surely didn't want to overproof, so I put it in a 460F oven for 40 minutes.  Internal temperature measured 213F when it came out.


I waited 24 hours before slicing the bread and took pictures of the crumb at 48 hours as well.  The tangy taste continues to improve as time goes by.  It does not taste like brick and has not cracked my teeth.  The nuts have created a light texture similar to that of banana bread, but without the fatty ingredients.  It is a loaf I'll re-try, just to make it perfect. If you have a formula for something similar to this loaf, please kindly share it so that I won't be so clueless and have some directions to follow next time.


Here are the pictures:


http://www.flickr.com/photos/33569048@N05/sets/72157621140385262/

Comments

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

Do you have his book?


I think your bread looks great. I'm sure it's delicious and healthful.


Patricia

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Patricia.  I don't have any book by Hammelman.  Is it the Bread book you are talking about? How did he name this 'brick'? I'm so curious.  Thanks again.


Yippee

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Now if you are looking for fluffy rye, try mixing it with some spelt flour along with bread flour.  Fluffs it up everytime!  I think they were made for each other.  I try to get the rye sour and rye together for as long as I can before adding non-rye flours to the dough esp. when using some commercial yeast.   Folding sticky rye is easier with a wet silicone spatula on a non-stick surface.  (There are recipes all over the place!)   Rye doesn't have to be baked higher than 205°F. 


Mini

cajmp's picture
cajmp

I agree that by adding spelt and bread flour your rye loaf comes out lighter. I thought it was also more digestable -but maybe that is just me. I bake my rye loaves at 325F for 50min. Could you explain about why you bake your rye no higher than 205 and how long should you bake it at that temp.


cajmp

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Thanks for your information.


 



Now if you are looking for fluffy rye



I'm not, but I’ll keep your tips in mind. I like the nuttiness and the little chewy texture as is.


 



I try to get the rye sour and rye together for as long as I can before adding non-rye flours to the dough esp. when using some commercial yeast.



Could you please explain the theory behind it?


 


Thank you.


Yippee

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

In your recipe, it is not clear if the rye flour was combined with the rye flour first, so I mentioned



I try to get the rye sour and rye together for as long as I can before adding non-rye flours to the dough esp. when using some commercial yeast.



The theory is adding acid or sourdough to the rye achieves the lower pH needed to neutralize the rye amylases that can break down the dough structure preventing the loaf from rising.  Rye tends to have more of these and the sooner they are neutralized, the better for good dough stretch structure.  There is a reasonable time factor involved; the ripening of the sour (starter) fed with the rye; "for as long as I can" which also means until it is sour.  If too much commercial yeast is used, the flavor is not developed in the rye dough and taste will suffer.  So I think it important to let the rye sour separately first.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rye_bread


Mini

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Yippee.


You may find this old topic helpful in building a rye sour. It describes a very traditional and effective method.


http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/4796/greenstein039s-sourdough-rye-rye-sour-care-and-feeding-illustrated


David

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Mini and David.  Your information is very helpful.


Yippee