The Fresh Loaf

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first sourdough 100% wholemeal

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zoe34's picture
zoe34

first sourdough 100% wholemeal

Hi folks I have been baking my family bread for about four months now. I got Richard Bertinets books which have basically tought me everything I know todate.  I haven't varied much from either white / brown / wholemeal etc. 


 


So on the 28th (9 days ago) I started off a sourdough starter. 


Richards technique is roughly stage 1 - make starter leave 36 - 48 hours


 


stage 2 all of mixture from stage 1 then feed


leave 24 hours


stage 3 feed leave 12 hours


stage 4 leave between 2 to 5 days depending on the level of sourness you like. 


 


So I am not at stage 5 nine days later which is making the sourdough. I took half of my mixture and added double flour and equal water, needed, rising and a further prove until tomorrow which is baking. The other half has been fed again and gone back into the fridge for the next batch.


So heres the question appologies for the preamble.  I've made some mistakes.  Firstly I ran out of white flour and couldn't get to the shops so I have mostly used wholemeal flour. dough feels and looks like my normal yeasted bread very smooth and spongy so I am hopeful it will be ok.  Its not heavy at this stage anyway. Do you think I will get away with this? I did add a small amount of white (hardly any) and a small amount of spelt into the mix.


I don't have any proving baskets so I am going to use bread tins which I usually use. I assume that this is ok


 


Richard Bertinet recommends a prove of 16 - 18 hours - well that would be now 2pm tomorrow afternoon.  Well I am at work !  so that would be 23 hours proving.  How tolerant is the proving proces for sourdough. I was thinking perhaps if I retard the proving in the fridge. I've read about this but had mixed results in the past with this.  It is quite warm here being summer so I am not sure what to do?


 


Ok its a lesson in preparation but I'll certainly learn something.


 


I've seen various methods of sourdough - I think the recipie I have got seems to be one of the most drawn out in terms of getting the starter going etc. 


 


There seems to be so many ways of doing this process.  Its almost like folklore.


 


any help grately received.  Regards Zoe


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Hi Zoe. It sounds like you are doing fine.



I've made some mistakes.  Firstly I ran out of white flour and couldn't get to the shops so I have mostly used wholemeal flour.



I'm a little confused about your stage, whether you now have a sourdough starter or are still in the process of making one. In any event, adding some wholemeal flour won't ruin the starter. If anything, the starter should like it--should react well to its addition.


You can use bread tins as proofing baskets. I often use a straw basket.


As far as where you proof (retard) the dough, if your environment is warm it will probably take less than the 16 to 18 hours. If it only takes 12 hours, perhaps you would be home to bake the loaf? I suppose you could put it in the fridge, but that might add another level of uncertainty to your process.


--Pamela

zoe34's picture
zoe34

I've finished the starter stage and now at the proving stage... thanks for the response. Zoe

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Just let it finish proofing and see what happens. If it doesn't turn out well this time, you can try again.


--Pamela

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

to go faster too.   So I'm guessing your times will be shorter.  If you haven't baked before work, try putting them into the refrigerator, this will slow them down until you get home and it will thicken up the dough a little.


Mini

zoe34's picture
zoe34

 


well it came out ok the top didn't rise much, it was quite sour for my taste. I assume that next time I do this the sourness will diminish a bit because I will next bake in 2 - 3 days.  In otherwords because I matured the origional starter for more than a week will it still keep the bread sour on an ongoing basis. My assumption is this bread changes over time?  Could I add a bit of honey to the bread when I bake it?  thanks Zoe