The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread Machine Sourdough Light Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf.

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Bread Machine Sourdough Light Whole Wheat Sandwich Loaf.

My wife makes three loaves of light whole wheat bread, alternating every other week with an all-white flour version of the same recipe. Two of the loaves are our "daily bread", the third routinely goes to a neighbor. She uses our bread machine, a Zo, on the "Dough" setting, and does a 2nd bulk fermentation, panning and proofing, and baking outside the machine. The machine does a one hour bulk proof; her second bulk proof is usually 2 to 2-1/2 hours depending on the dough's behavior. The long bulk proofings allow the doughs, expecially the whole wheat version, a chance to develop good flavors.


Curious if I could convert the recipe to a sourdough, i scaled it to produce the same dough weight and hydration as the original recipe, but replaced some of the white flour and water with 240g of active sourdough starter at 60% hydration, built using the 3-build approach I use for all my sourdough formula.



The photo answers my curiousty with a firm yes.


However, the experiement taught me the question I should have asked: "Is it worth the additional time and effort?"


This bread is all one would ask for in a sandwich bread: excellent flavor; closed, but light and slightly chewy crumb; and a soft crust--even before I brushed them with butter. But I can say the same things about my wife's bread. Here's a photo of her all-white version I took a couple of weeks ago.



From my point-of-view we're going to stay with the tried and true Yvonne has baked for the last six years. Doing the sourdough was fun, and we will certainly enjoy eating the result.


Sometime in the future I'm going to see if I can be successful baking a single sourdough loaf entirely in the Zo. I think it's possible, in the programmable mode, using a very active starter, and removing the paddles after the knead step. This will allow up to a four hour bulk fermentation step. But that's for another day.

Comments

Nomadcruiser53's picture
Nomadcruiser53

Nice looking breads. I like your idea of removing the paddles in the BM. I always hate the hole. Dave

photojess's picture
photojess

where can I find that recipe, if you don't mind me asking?  I'd love to have more that are tried and true!  No bread machine here though.

davidg618's picture
davidg618

is from Bread Machine, by Jennie Shapter, out of print, but still available from Amazon sellers. My adaptation merely replaces some of the flour and water with 240g of sourdough starter at 60% hydration, and 200g of the white flour with whole wheat flour.


David G.

redashley's picture
redashley

David,


The only buttermilk bread I could find is a Spelt and Bulger Wheat on page 66, is this the right one?  I'm a beginner and wonder what you mean by a second bulk fermentation.  I am finding that I like the breads that are baked in the oven rather than the machine.  How long did you bake the bread and at what temperature?  I have used here Egg-enriched bread and really like it.

davidg618's picture
davidg618

in my edition Spelt and Bulger Wheat is on page 92, and Buttermilk is on page 68.  Maybe your edition is older and doesn't have this recipe. I'm very sensitive about honoring copyright laws, but since you already have a copy of the book I'll send you a message here on the TFL  containing the large loaf ingredients, and the changes we've made.


What I mean by a second bulk fermentation is some recipes instruct the baker to let the dough rise, in bulk, for a prescribed time or until doubled, then deflate it and let it rise a second time, still in bulk, before shaping and panning the dough. Our bread machine, a Zo, has two bulk rises, back-to-back, but the paddles turn to deflate the risen dough between the two rise steps. Taking the paddles out after the Knead Step (just before the 1st Rise Step) the paddle shafts will still spin between Rise 1 and Rise 2 but the dough won't deflate. It's also a good practice to remove the paddles after they've done their jobs even if your running a pre-programmed course and baking in the machine. You wiind up only with two small holes in the bottom of the loaf instead of the large paddle-shaped holes.


The bread's large recipe makes three approximately 1 lb. loaves. We bake them for 30 mins without steam, at 350°F. I baked the sourdough version at the same temperature, for the same time. Actually, I use a thermometer and measure the internal temperature of a loaf; we remove at 205°F internal temperature, and that occures after about 30 mins.


David G.


P.S. I'll send the message immediately

photojess's picture
photojess

don't need to go out and get that, but they sure are pretty!