The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Quick question about perforated bread pans

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KenB's picture
KenB

Quick question about perforated bread pans

I just got back from a quick trip to Northern California (Sacramento), where I picked up one of those dual perforated french bread pans, made by Chicago Metallic. Anyway, I've got a dough rising and I thought I would try the pan out this afternoon.


Here's my question: usually, I bake my loaves on a preheated baking stone; do I use the stone with the pan, or just put the pan in the oven on an oven rack? The only directions that came with the pan say to reduce the heat 25F less than a recipe calls for (I'm assuming to avoid burning the bottom of the loaf). I usually preheat at 500 and then reduce the heat to 450 five minutes after I put the bread in the oven. I guess I'll reduce the heat to 425, then.


Thoughts, anyone? Thanks.


Ken

nbicomputers's picture
nbicomputers

put it on the rack. the pan has made for ovens without a stone hearth so the heat and steam can contact all parts on the baking bread

KenB's picture
KenB

That seems sensible enough. I'll give it a try. Thanks!


Ken


 

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

They have worked well for me.  I put a light coat of oil on the pan.  I use a temp of 425 most of the time.


Dave

KenB's picture
KenB

Thanks for the note, Dave. I baked two loaves earlier today with the pan, and it worked fairly well, except that both loaves split uncontrollably near the bottom line of each loaf, despite my careful slashing. They may have been underproofed a bit, but maybe more practice using the thing will help my chops. I also lightly oiled the pan and used a temperature of 425.

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith


I also use these pans to make large dinner rolls / small loafs.  About 100 to 120 grams each (4 to 4.5 oz.).  I get 4 per pan and use a single slash down the center of the top.  This size make a nice dinner roll for two to share with my spouse.  I freeze these and it makes it easy to grab one for dinner.  We reheat in the oven at 350 F for about 5 minutes.  I have made these with lots of different doughs and all have worked well.  I just adjust the temperature to the dough I am using.  I often do this with the last 400 to 500 grams of dough from a large batch when I am baking other forms of loafs.


 


Dave


Leesky's picture
Leesky

Do you do the 2nd fermentation right in the pan?


I'm still having deflation issues moving my risen loaves to the oven

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith


After shaping the rolls, I go right to the pan and let them do their final proofing in the pan.  Same if making a full-length loaf.  I spray with a light coating of oil and cover with plastic wrap.  When proofed they go straight into the oven – no transfer is required.  They may look a bit like commercial store bread with the little bumps on the bottom but taste way better.


 


Dave


Just Loafin's picture
Just Loafin

Trick for reducing the bumps:


Use a well-floured linen cloth (typical benneton liner, tea towel, etc.) over the pan. Draw up center of cloth until the edges of both sides are equal to the rails of the pan (leaving a big gathering of cloth in the middle). Shape loaves and transfer to the lined pan with seam side UP. When finished proofing, pull up from the middle towards one side. The pulling up motion will start rolling the loaf over. Finish motion by completely removing the side of the cloth. If done right, the seam side will now be DOWN. Repeat for other side. Slash, bake. : )


Two small pieces of parchment paper will probably accomplish the same thing.


- Keith

KenB's picture
KenB

Actually, I did two rises in a bowl before shaping and then a third rise (post-shaping) in the pan for 30 minutes while the oven heated. And yep, I sprayed the pan lightly with oil and covered the loaves with a dishtowel, actually. We've already just about finished eating the two loaves I made; I'll try it again tomorrow and see what happens this time.


Thanks for the notes!


Ken