The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Gosselin Cold Autolyze Method

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colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

Gosselin Cold Autolyze Method

Has anyone else been trying to generalize the Gossilin cold autolyze method?  By that I mean mixing cold water with flour, no yeast or salt, and leaving it in the refrigerator overnight, before completing the recipe the next day.


I think doing that helps me get a better gluten development with a lot less kneading.  I have been doing that with almost all of my loaves for the past few weeks.


Colin

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Colin.


The baguettes I've made with Gosselin's method (the original method, not Reinhart's modification) have been the sweetest tasting every. I have not used his cold water autolyse for other breads. However, I have used Anis Bouabsa's cold fermentation of the complete dough for baguettes, boules and bâtards with what I consider outstanding results.


I'd be interesting in knowing what breads besides baguettes you have made with cold autolyse. Have you tried Bouabsa's method in comparison? If so, what did you find?


David

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple


David,


I have had good success with mini-baguettes, using a variety of methods, and using both instant yeast and sourdough.  I have a 3-slot metal form that I bought from amazon.com.  I line it with parchment paper, put the shaped baguettes in it for the final rise, and then bake it in the form, on top of a baking stone, and covered with a turned-over roasting pan for the first half of the bake.


Boules are more difficult for me.  When I take them from the basket I put them in for the final rise, they spread significantly.  I am quite sure the gluten is not suffciently developed.  I think I am patience-challenged during the kneading process.


The Gosselin process helps; the boules do not spread as much, but I still need to work on the kneading.


The description of the Bouabsa method looks pretty tedious to me with all that folding; not for me.


Colin

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Colin.


Nice looking breads!


Re. Boules "spreading:" That could be because of insufficient gluten development, but it can also be because of not forming a tight "skin" of gluten when you shape them. It can also be just because you are using a high-hydration dough (>68%). If the latter is the case, I wouldn't worry about some spreading. It's normal. Oven spring takes care of it.


Re. the "Bouabsa method:" You do have to stay close to the dough for a while, but each folding takes only a couple minutes, once you get the rhythm. I find I can get other stuff done during this time, just so it's something I can leave for 2 minutes every 30 minutes. I find it a satisfying process - feeling the dough develop under your hands. It's also nice in that all the "kneading" is in the same bowl. There is no counter to clean and no mixer. Besides, it makes great bread!


But, as they say, "Different strokes for different folks."


David

colinwhipple's picture
colinwhipple

David,


I am trying to get sandwich slices out of the boules, so the less spreading the better.


I should be able to get 4-6 slices for my lunches out of a one pound boule.


I am using the Gosselin method to prep the dough, but I am not using the degree of hydration called for in Reinhart's email.  The loaves in the photo are under 65%.  They also have a couple tablespoons of unsalted butter, so they will go stale more slowly.


Colin

pattycakes's picture
pattycakes

I've made the Gosselin and the Anis baguettes, and both came out great with the cold overnight autolyse. As far as the boule spreading, I have found that folding the dough several times during the rise really helps it to come together along with good shaping, as David said. Also, watch Mark's way of shaping a boule. (From Backstreet Bakery) You can get a really nice, tight skin by turning the preformed boule between your hands on an unfloured surface. Your pinkies and the side of your hands stay on the countertop, and as you turn, they very slightly pinch the dough to pull it down. (This is a very inadequate description of something that you can get by watching Mark's video!) http://www.thefreshloaf.com/keyword/boule?page=1


Hope this helps!


Patricia