The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Leader's Polish Cottage Rye

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Leader's Polish Cottage Rye

Last bread for the day - Polish Cottage Rye from Leader's "Local Breads." This is another of my personal favorites. Today, I made it with a rye sour fed with whole rye rather than the white rye Leader calls for. I like it both ways.




David

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

It's been a long productive day of baking for you, David!  Good night to you and your Gorgeous Boule...what a breakfast awaits you!


Sylvia

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Sylvia.

Yeah! Waffles!

David

ehanner's picture
ehanner

You will be dreaming of pleasant little yeasties. Nice looking collection for the day.


Eric

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I'm dreaming about this delicious bread! I can't wait to make it again.


--Pamela

TeaIV's picture
TeaIV

again, your baking skills amaze me! I aspire to make bread as good as yours.


 


I have one question, though. what's the difference between polish cottage rye and other rye breads? it looks like a more rustic bread, but I'm not sure.


 


TeaIV

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I'm not sure to which "other rye breads" you wish me to compare the Polish Cottage Rye. I'll give you a few of it's pertinent characteristics and hope I answer you question.


1. All the rye flour is in the form of rye sour (It's all pre-fermented).


2. It is a high-hydration dough, so your characterization of it as a "rustic bread" is accurate. It ends up more like a French country bread than a German rye. The combination of high-hydration, strong wheat flour and full gluten development result in a much lighter bread with a more open crumb than you might expect.


3. It is "pure" sourdough. No added yeast.


4. It has no added seeds or spices.


Hope that helps.


David

TeaIV's picture
TeaIV

so an SD starter that contains all of the rye flour, and you use bread flour in the final dough?


sounds interesting.


 


TeaIV

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Not only interesting, but also delicious.


I'd encourage you to try it.


David

TeaIV's picture
TeaIV

well, I have a couple of breads on my list, plus, I need to pick up some rye and bread flour. I'll try it sometime, though.

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Hi David


Like Pamela, I am dreaming about this delicious bread too.  This bread is full of that country rustic look, and to me, "full of soul."    It is so inspiring to me. I love it!


Shiao-Ping

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Hi, Shiao-Ping.


I certainly agree. This is a delicious bread and one of my favorites.


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It is one of the best breads I've ever made--definitely in the top three. I copied David's advice about Leader's instructions into Local Breads.


--Pamela

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Good morning, Pamela, would you mind letting me know where David's advice is about Leader's instruction re the Polish Cottage Rye?  Are you referring to his reply to TeaIV on June 9?  Thanks.

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I don't know where it is but I wrote David's advice in my book:



Mix 13 to 14 minutes on speed 4--dough doesn't come together until at least 13 minutes and you think it never will. Very slack and sticky, but that's how you get the big holes. Flour banneton very well with rye flour.



--Pamela

Shiao-Ping's picture
Shiao-Ping

Shiao-Ping