The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Yippee, my experiment results

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Yippee, my experiment results

OK, I tried your whole wheat banana sandwich bread and it turned out good.  As crazy as I am... added sesame seeds seemed to add the crunch. 


Then yesterday I used both SD and water roux starter to make my regular SD wheat sandwich loaves.  I didn't use a lot of water roux starter, 1/2 of what I'd used in my banana bread, about 50 grams.  The rest of the ingredients remained the same as my original recipe.  The results... not much difference! 


Since I used more flour and more water (the water roux starter) the total volume increased (expected).  The flavor was not as strong as my regular SD (probably had to do with the fact that I didn't feed my starter for a week - too busy playing with water roux bread LOL) and I used kefir whey instead of yogurt whey.  The only sorta significant difference was rising time.  My regular SD dough usually takes about 4 hours to rise 1st, then about 2 hrs for 2nd rise.  But my dough yesterday took about 3.5 hours and 1.5 hrs respectively.  I am not sure if it had something to do with the fact that our days are getting warmer or the combination of the SD and water roux starter sped up the process.


Next time I will try to use a bit more water roux and a bit less SD starter.  Have to wait for a week though.  We have three loaves of breads now and I don't want to make any more.  That would drive my husband crazy! ;^)

Yippee's picture
Yippee

of flour and the corresponding amount (5x) of water needed are what I usually pull from a regular recipe to make the water roux starter and that's how I converted m y friend's home recipe to this one, plus minor adjustments to butter and sugar. Normally, I do not use more flour and water than what a recipe originally calls for.


What's LOL?


Yippee

LeLongCarabine's picture
LeLongCarabine

laugh out loud LOL so now you know


 

Yippee's picture
Yippee

Thank you.


Yippee

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Yes, that's what I've noticed.  I read a few of them and did the math, it's always 5%.  What I am not sure is... if the purpose of gelatinization is to allow more water absorption, should I reduce the hydration level of my SD starter?  I used 166%.  If the 5% comes from the original recipe, should I take it from my SD starter, or should I reduce the amount of flour(s)?  Or does it matter?

Yippee's picture
Yippee

If you are starting this conversion process from a working sourdough recipe to include a water roux starter, I'd say it's quite straight forward.  To me, the most puzzling part is to determine how much sourdough starter to use when I convert a regular sandwich loaf to sourdough, but you already have the answer. If I were you, here's what I'd do: 



  1. calculate the 5% of flour needed for the water roux starter

  2. 1. above x 5 =  amount of water needed for the water roux starter

  3. see if you can deduct 1. and 2. from anywhere in your recipe first without altering the sourdough starter

  4. if you cannot pull enough liquid out of 3. for your water roux starter, then I would play with the hydration of the starter. I would not touch the SD starter first because that's what initally works in your regular SD recipe.  Changing it would pose more risks and uncertainty in your new recipe, at least that's how I feel because I have very limited exposure to sourdough.


Yippee

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Thanks Yippee for the formula.  I will try it next time.  It makes sense to deduct it from the ingredients than from the SD starter.  The flour shouldn't be a problem at all.  The water, on the other hand, may present a small problem.  Instead of using 1:5 ratio to make the water roux starter, I used 1:6 because I used WW flour.  The first time I used 1:5 the starter didn't turn out right.  It was way too thick and I ended up making the dough into flat bread (still yummy).  The second time I used 1:6 and it worked out to perfection.  If I pull the water from my whey or milk, I may have room for very little liquid for kneading.  But again, the amount of water in the two starters may make up the difference.  I might as well give it another try next week.  Thanks for your inputs!


Yippee's picture
Yippee


I used WW flour



 


Me, too.  But 1:5 has always worked in my ww starter. Check your temperature, you may have overcooked it.  


 


Yippee


 

Yippee's picture
Yippee


the amount of water in the two starters may make up the difference.



 


Most of the time they will.  If the dough doesn't come together at the beginning, wait a little bit longer into kneading before you add additional liquid (in small increments).  If you start adding extra liquid too soon, the dough may end up too wet.