The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Peach Pie

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Peach Pie

Okay, I'm going to admit it.....  I'm just about the only one in my family with a sweet tooth!  One of my grandmothers had one but unfortunately she is no longer with us.  I realized that I was the sole family member left to carry her torch as I gradually noticed that I was the one who always got nominated to make desserts for our family gatherings.  It's not that I'm some kind of pastry chef, I'm just the only one who really enjoys making desserts.  So this is how I will preface yet another post from me in the "sweets" forum.


I got the recipe for Summer Fruit Pie from the CI Best Recipe book, and I have made it with various fruits many times.  In this instance I used the excuse that I had received fresh peaches from my parents who had picked them from a peach farm here in North FL.   After DH and I ate our fill of raw ones, I put the rest in this pie:




This is a very easy and satisfying crust for which the food processor does most of the mixing.


Summer

xaipete's picture
xaipete

It looks delicious, Summer. I love pies and peaches. I'm sure it is a winner. How did you make the crust?


--Pamela

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Pamela,


I just found the same recipe on the CI website that I used from the Best Recipe cookbook.  The only difference is that it is cut in half because it is for the bottom shell only.  Double it and shape it into two equal disks if you want to do a top shell like on my pie.


Ingredients

1 1/4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour , plus extra for dusting dough
1/2 teaspoon table salt
1 tablespoon granulated sugar
6 tablespoons unsalted butter , chilled, cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 tablespoons vegetable shortening , chilled
3–4 tablespoons ice water
Instructions
  1. 1. Mix flour, salt, and sugar in food processor fitted with steel blade. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture, tossing to coat butter with a little of the flour. Cut butter into flour with five 1-second pulses. Add shortening and continue cutting in until flour is pale yellow and resembles coarse cornmeal, with butter bits no larger than small peas, about four more 1-second pulses. Turn mixture into medium bowl.

  2. 2. Sprinkle 3 tablespoons ice water over mixture. With blade of rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix. Press down on dough with broad side of spatula until dough sticks together, adding up to 1 tablespoon more ice water if it will not come together. Shape into ball with hands, then flatten into 4-inch-wide disk. Dust lightly with flour, wrap in plastic, and refrigerate at least 30 minutes before rolling

The only substitution that I made was lard for shortening because I think it has a richer flavor.  Like you, I have an aversion to vegetable shortening.  To me it's like getting all of the bad fat with little flavor to show for it!  The slightly improved texture just isn't worth it.

Summer

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks, Summer. That is real close to the recipe I used for the crust on my Cherry Pie which came from Cooks Illustrated Online!


I don't really have an aversion to Crisco except in the sense that we've all been told it is so bad for us. As I understand it, the lard that is purchased in the grocery store is also hydrogenated so unless it is made at home or obtained from some non-grocery store source, it probably isn't any better health-wise.


As an aside: my husband's 90 year old mother probably made over a 1000 pies, all with Crisco. She also baked 10 loaves of bread per week, again, exclusively with Crisco. Nearly all of her cakes and cookies were made with, you guessed it, Crisco. And then there were the probably 10,000 chickens, that were to die for although they haven't killed her yet, that she fried in Crisco.


Anyway, the main point is that a little bit of shortening does a lot for a pie crust. Apparently part of the magic of Crisco is that it, unlike butter, contains no water and more air.


--Pamela

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Oh I'm under no delusion that either lard or Crisco is good for you.  I don't even consider health when I use one over the other.  I've just made that particular crust with both and find that the lard crust tastes more satisfying and buttery, though like I said before there is a slight texture sacrifice - less flaky, more like savory, crusty shortbread.


I'll bet your mother in law makes some awesome fried chicken - one of my favorite foods!  Hopefully your husband inherited her good genes.


Summer

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You've got my mouth watering just before bedtime, and all I've got is Rice Krispie squares!

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Hey, as someone who has to have something sweet after supper, I know that Rice Krispie squares will do in a pinch!


Summer

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I make those too: individual servings. I put Rice Krispies in a bowl with a little butter and marshmallows and nuke them for about 15 seconds. Tastes great and are available whenever I feel the need. Only Kraft MMs and real RKs taste authentic though. (About 15 g of each and half as much butter.)


--Pamela

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

before I could make a pie!  But I don't think that is going to help.. They just keep getting sweeter!  Your lovely pie doesn't help my cravings !  It's just that time of year for pies and bar-b-que! 


Sylvia

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Mmmmm...   bar-b-que....  Can't wait to break out the grill!

ehanner's picture
ehanner

OK for those of us who haven't made a peach pie, can you fill in the details? I make apple pie for the holidays and I have taken to nuke the apples to get them started cooking, then I add the sugar and spices. Is the same true with peaches?


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Hi Eric, I like useing Tapioca Flour for my thickner.  It makes for a nice clear thickner surrounding the peaches.  Peaches aren't going to have natural pectin like apples so allow for this...  Also I use freestone...they are much easier to handle and many wonderful varieties and flavors.  I also like useing fresh sliced up peaches in my pies..I like them to be able to hold a bit of shape in the pie.  Fried peach and apricot pies are my very favorite...and useing dried fruit cooked down with sugar until nice and thick is to die for...if you have fresh do the same for fried pies.  Oh yes, like bread be sure and wait till nice and cooled down before slicing so you don't have a runny pie.  When you put sugar on your peaches don't let it sit to long because that sugar is going to draw out a lot of juice...just like apples!  Bake in a very hot oven 450 for about 15 minutes then reduce to 350 for and bake for about another 35 minutes.  I always cover my crust rim with either foil or a tin pie crust rimmer..and usually leave it there nearly the whole time..I don't like my crust rim overly browned.  I always bake on a cookie sheet..so I'm not sorry about any juice spills..  Also peaches make for wonderful cobblers...I like just placing peaches in my oblong glass roasting pan and cover it with a regular thick pie crust...not as fattening without a bottom crust ; ) and just as good.  You can add spices you like- cinnamon, nutmeg...I like just a bit of butter!  These are just a few suggestions... Happy Baking,


Sylvia


 

Paddyscake's picture
Paddyscake

had a recipe for Blueberry Pie which I tried and came out great. The thickener was a grated Granny Smith Apple and 2 T instant tapioca, ground (tapioca flour!) This produced a filling that wasn't gummy, was juicy, but not runny. It set up perfectly.


The other secret ingredient for the crust was vodka! They say it's essential for the texture of the crust. I won't argue, it was great.


Betty

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I haven't tried that vodka crust yet, but it sounds great and is on my list.


--Pamela

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

I'll vouch for the vodka as well.  I made that crust awhile back and it came out great.  CI also uses it as an ingredient in sorbet to make it smooth since vodka doesn't freeze at typical freezer temps.  Makes me wonder why I spent all those years making brick hard sorbet!


Summer

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

I have never tried a "fried pie."  Wow.


Tapioca flour totally makes sense texture-wise.  Then you don't have the little tapioca beads to contend with when you use instant tapioca like I did.


BTW I was going back and forth on whether to make pie or cobbler.  I love cobbler too!


Summer

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Summer, If you want a tried and true recipe and simply the best...for fried pies give this one a try!  The crust is different for fried pies and this one is perfect and works great for the deep frying...easy to work with and makes the most delicious fried pies...filling and all...I deep fry in my really old deep fryer...it's easier and makes the frying so much easier and the pies come out perfect.  I've fried in electric and iron pans..but the deep fryer was the best.  When done I wrap them in paper towels and put them in shoe box in the refrigerator...just like my mother'n'law  used to do...I don't know why but they taste delicious chilled too!  The recipe is written out and easy to follow...go to http://www.allrecipes.com  it's called Apricot and Peach fried pies.  This recipe I guess has been around since the covered wagon days!


Sylvia

micki's picture
micki

Sylvia, have you made fried pies using fresh peaches?  This looks wonderful but all I have on hand is fresh.  I do plan to try that Cobbler they show.  It also makes my mouth water.  But, oh boy, fried pies!  Would I ever score points with that!  I've got the deep fryer ready to go.


I grew up with 'Crisps' - apple, blueberry, rhubarb - vs 'Cobblers'.  There truly is a difference.  Also, most Southerners don't care for cinnamon in their peach 'anything' (that's how my Georgia-bred husband says it).  Whereas, I thought cinnamon was dashed into everything (Minnesota-bred).  I've been in Alabama for 30+ years now.  Guess my taste buds have changed some.

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

My husband is not much into cinnamon either.  I always have to cut the amount of cinnamon in a recipe in half.  That goes for nutmeg, allspice, cardamom and anything else you might put into a dessert.  He is from England and apparently they don't use much spice in sweets.  Apple crisp is apples and pastry, period.  I'm from here in Tallahassee, which might as well be South Georgia and pies in this region seem to be fairly moderate on spice anyway.....  But we like a little to liven up the flavor!


Summer

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

That must be why I like butter...though spices won't stop me from enjoying a good pie.  My family is all from England and Ireland....I was born in Belfast.  My Mum always just put dopples of butter on her pies.    The deep fryer..your post a little farther down..well it's my favorite because there are no splatters to clean up all over the place and the temperature regulator is good for frying...  though I absolutely love my iron pans!


Sylvia

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

 or I should say a puree!  I always used fresh Apricots when I first started making these pies..my mother n law had a hugh tree in her yard...we just simply cooked them down and added enough sugar to taste....the filling will be very much like a thick sauce/puree..not any big chunks..it was cooked down slowly until it reached the right consistancy..nice and thick so about 2 big tablespoons goes into each pie..you can do the same with the peaches...I never used the dried until I tried the recipe from the site I listed and the dried are excellent.  You can freeze any leftover for pies later...don't forget to add a little bit of lemon juice!  I don't see why you couldn't make these pies with any fruit!  I'm just a big fan of apricot and/or peaches!  You don't have to skin the apricots...or dried fruit!


Sylvia

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

Sylvia,


I've been trying to talk DH into getting a deep fryer since he is (mainly) the one who cleans the kitchen and complains about the grease when I use the iron pan, which is not really deep enough and creates a lot of splatter.  When I get one I'll have to remember your paper towel/shoebox tip.  I bookmarked the allrecipe pie.


Summer

micki's picture
micki

Drop your peaches in a pan of boiling water for 30 seconds to one minute.  Remove and plop into ice water to stop the cooking and cool the skin.  Peel skin with a paring knife.  Most times, skin just slides off!  I say most as that method has always worked until this past week when I tried it on some early Chilton County peaches.  Those skins were terribly tough and I ended up losing a good deal of 'meat'.  (A pop into boiling water is also how I skin tomatoes.)  Peach pies are delicious!


 


A quick correction on my comment about "most times".  Those peaches weren't quite ripe enough.  Tried again yesterday, less than 30 seconds in that boiling water and they started shedding skins themselves!  Am just starting to slowly cook down a batch to make fried pies later today.  Thanks, Sylvia.

ehanner's picture
ehanner

Fried pies, what a hoot. That has me off the couch and heading for the super. I must admit that I have struggled with pie crust for years. I have all the secrets and every now and then I do manage to make one without over handling the dough, but usually my crust is just so so. Peach pie is on the list for sure.


Am I hearing that no spice is necessary? Cinnamon/nutmeg optional for regional taste?


Thanks,


Eric

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Spices and dabs of butter are strickly a personal preference!  Cinnamon and/or nutmeg....are not my favorite things in pie!  However, I do like a tiny touch of almond extract in my cherry pie's, lemon zest in my blueberry!  In my fried/pocket pies I never add  butter or spices...surgar sprinkled on top of the crust is nice..but not so great if the pie is getting carried around in the hand! 


Sylvia

PMcCool's picture
PMcCool

Eric,


I strongly suggest an extended visit to one or more Southern states--you'll come back with a thicker recipe card file and a thicker waistline.  ;-)


In addition to fried pies, you'll run into barbecue in infinite varieties (it has nothing to do with grilling), gumbo, crawfish boils, burgoo, sweet tea, sweet potato pie, biscuits beyond imagining, catfish, etouffe, sorghum syrup, Chatham Artillery Punch (makes mint juleps look like koolaid), bourbon, hushpuppies, and people who can argue the merits of specific varieties of pecans the way you can talk about varieties of apples.  And that only begins to suggest the possibilities.  


Since TFLers are global in reach, maybe we should start a new thread about the dishes that are unique or indigenous to our locales.


Paul

LuLu B's picture
LuLu B

Let's start a thread for it. I have recipes.