The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

DiMuzio's San Francisco Sourdough

  • Pin It
xaipete's picture
xaipete

DiMuzio's San Francisco Sourdough

Happy Memorial Day, Everybody!

I made Dan's SF SD bread yesterday, baked it last night (it got a lot of oven spring), and let it cool on the counter overnight. When I sliced into it this morning, I was very pleased with its structure and open crumb. I would have liked a bit more tang but think that could be achieved by retarding the proof overnight in the fridge. I'm not sure if that would required reducing the amount of starter, but perhaps Dan will supply an opinion. Dan's formula for SFSD was both easy and rapid. Another benefit to Dan's formula (indeed all of the formulas in Bread Baking) is that you can use KA AP, which can be purchased is 25 pound sacks, instead of KA Bread flour. I was amazed that I could turn such a professional looking loaf in a mere day, not counting the time required for getting the starter ready. Dan's formula also incorporated a lot more starter in it than I'm used to! I think this was a very successful bake and I would definitely recommend it to anyone wanting to reproduce an authentic San Francisco Sourdough!

dimuzio san francisco sourdough

Formula for two loaves:

700 g bread flour (because KA bread flour is so strong, I used KA AP)

500 g water

20 g salt

480 g firm ripe levain (67% hydration)

My method: mix the water and ripe levain together to combine, add the remaining ingredients and mix with the paddle on speed 1 for 1 minute. Turn off mixer and let rest 5 minutes. Mix with dough hook on speed 2 for 4 minutes. Let dough rest covered in mixer bowl for 20 minutes. Dump dough on lightly floured counter and do a stretch and fold. Put dough into an oiled dough bucket and let rest another 20 minutes. Do another stretch and fold. Let rise until double in the covered dough bucket. Form into two loaves and proof onto a well-floured linen-lined banneton until nearly double. Bake at 450º on a hot stone with steam until done, about 27 minutes. Let rest in a turned off oven for about 10 minutes to darken and harden the crust.

dimuzio san francisco sourdough

--Pamela

Comments

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

What a great looking loaf ! I like the idea of using a lot of starter. I think it really makes the bread texture and flavor so much better. I haven't bought his book yet so i am glad you posted the formula. I will try it next week. A side note...why is your starter at 67%? I find it so much easier to always use 100%,,,am I missing aomething ????   c

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The starter has a 67% hydration level. All the SFSD recipes I've seen require a firm starter.


--Pamela

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Nice bake, Pamela.


I'd recommend that interested bakers purchase Dan's book as not only does it contain many more good formulas, but excellent techical information.


 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The book is packed full of information and would be a great asset to any baker who really wants to take a more professional approach to making bread.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

Beautiful breads, Pamela. The crumb, especially, looks perfect.


Reinhart uses an even lower-hydration starter for his SF Sourdough, and also uses a high percentage of starter. The firmer starter favors development of acetic acid, especially at lower temperatures. It's interesting that Dan doesn't call for a cold fermentation of either the starter or the formed loaves. (This is from your description. I haven't read his book yet, except for the first chapter.)


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I think the specific method employed is left up to the maker. I can't wait to try it again with a retarded proof.


--Pamela

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Beautiful Loaf, Pamela!  Did you get one or two loaves from the formula?  The loaf looks like a nice size oval shape made with diagonal slashes?


Sylvia

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The formula is for two loaves. I was really happy with the way it turned out.


--Pamela

cake diva's picture
cake diva

Pamela,


Where do you get the 25# sacks?  The only large volume flour source I see here in Cincinnati is the CGS, and they do not carry KA.  I would have purchased other brands but all the flour they carry is bleached.  The store employee says it is rare that people ask for unbleached flour. 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Online. Twenty-five pounds sacks can be ordered online from King Arthur. If you wait for free or reduced shipping, it makes the price pretty decent.


--Pamela

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Cake Diva,


You live in Cincinnati?


I live in Cincinnati, as well.

cake diva's picture
cake diva

Hi dghdctr!


I live in West Chester  off I-75 Exit 19.  I'm delighted to have a neighbor in tfl.  Perhaps we can have a breadbake or maybe divvy up a big sack of flour one of these days.  I'm at tcmanuel@cinci.rr.com.


Thanks, Pam for the advice.  I'll look up KA now.

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Hi Pamela,


Very nice results.


A few nit-picky observations:


1) my intention with the levain in the SF SD was to have the baker make a 60% hydration starter 12 hours before use (180 grams of water / 300 grams flour = 60%).  I'm guessing you used ripe liquid levain to build the starter?  There's another example of where I should have been more specific.  Sorry about that.  This may have left your adjusted dough formula wetter than I had intended, but the bread came out just fine.


The intended hydration for the entire dough (after you've added the starter to the dough) was 67% or so.


If you liked or loved the dough just the way it is, then don't change it.  I just wanted to explain what I was specifically intending in the book.  As I think I have suggested before, personal preference should always trump holding fast to someone else's preferences.


2) The crumb looks good, but you'll get even bigger holes (alveoles) if you minimize the handling of the dough during division and shaping.  A long mixing time can also "handle" the dough too much, but your mixing instructions above tell me that was not the case here.  When you shape the loaf, just pull the skin toward the bottom without actually deflating the round very much.  Gather the pulled skin at the bottom into a seam, pinch it, and if the loaf's skin is now taut, either proof seam-side down on a well-floured proofing board or proof upside-down (seam side up) in a banneton or brotform.


3) Sourness in the starter can be intensified by maintaining a FIRM levain for a couple of days and using that as the basis for the final build.  Using a liquid levain to make the final build will generate somewhat less sharp acidity than using a firm levain to do so.  You can also use a lower temperature, but you're gambling with maintenance temperatures less than 50 degrees or so, in my opinion.  If your basement has an area that's 65 degrees or so most of the time, keeping your starter there will tend to create a sharper acidity.


--Dan DiMuzio

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Hi Dan. I did use a firm levain that I had fed/rebuilt 12 hours before putting the final dough together. I don't specifically remember how many days I had been doing 12 hour feeds on it now. I think it was for a couple of days, but next time I'll pay more attention to this and also make sure the hydration is at 60%.


One of the problems the home baker encounters is that he or she doesn't just make one type of bread over and over. But that is something I really ought to try for 3 or 4 days: make SFSD everyday for 4 days. That would really give me a sense of what I'm doing. When I get back from vacation, that is what I'm going to do. I've got plenty of people to give it away to.


I'll pay more attention to how much I handle the dough and the way I shape it next time too.


I can also keep a firm levain at 65 degrees without any issue. So I'll try that too.


Thanks a lot for your observations! I can't wait to try again.


--Pamela

weavershouse's picture
weavershouse

Perfect, looks delicious. I'm going to give this a try as soon as I get 480 grams of levain together.


weavershouse

xaipete's picture
xaipete

The formula makes two loaves; you can make one with half the levain.


--Pamela