The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

High-fiber adaptation

  • Pin It
dunaz's picture
dunaz

High-fiber adaptation

Hi all,I'm new to breadmaking and use a bread machine. So far things have been going gangbusters and I love it. Makes a great hostess gift, even if you make it from a mix it's appreciated. I am ready to delve into an everyday loaf that I can make a couple times a week and doesn't have all the cr*p that's in commercial breads. Currently, I buy a commercial whole wheat bread that is "double-fiber"--5 grams/slice! So, a sandwich made with this bread gives you 40% of the RDA for fiber at only 40 calories per slice. This is a boon for folks like me who count calories or otherwise pay attention to their diets. I want to create a bread like this. The main ingredient, as far as I can tell, in this commercial loaf that gives the fiber is soy fiber. 1. Any ideas on where I can get soy fiber? Googling comes up with powdered supplements that are sprinkled on food, which would work I suppose, with the right adjustments of the rest of the ingredients. I've seen soy flour and a slew of other Soy things. 2. Any other suggestions to up the fiber content? Now that I know what it's like getting enough fiber in my diet I never want to go back! <lol>3. If I find the soy fiber, any suggestions for modifying my favorite recipes? Thanks! 

beenjamming's picture
beenjamming

if i ever want to up the fiber content of my breads, i usually soak some bran (oat, rye or wheat- whatever i've got around) in water and pop in the the fridge the night before i make bread. then i prepare whatever dough i'm making, knead until it passes the window pane test, then knead in the bran paste. it's not going to give you as high a fiber content as the processed soy fiber, nor will it be flavorless, but it's cheap, easy to find and i generally love the flavor it adds.

sphealey's picture
sphealey

Where are you located? How to find specific ingredients varies in the US, UK, Asia, etc.

 

sPh

dunaz's picture
dunaz

Near Charlotte, NC, US. There is a fairly comprehensive natural foods store near here that I haven't had a chance to stop in to see if they have the fiber. Other than that, I was thinking an internet purchase would probably be my best bet. 

sphealey's picture
sphealey

King Arthur Flour is another good mail orders source ( http://www.bakerscatalogue.com ). Order a copy of their catalog; there is a ton of useful information in it. There are others that can be googled.

 

Except for perhaps northern California I haven't found any "heath food" stores in a long time that actually carry whole foods; most of the ones in the midwest are just dubious vitiman and herb mixtures.

 

sPh

sphealey's picture
sphealey

In the US, soy flour, wheat bran, and flaxseed meal are all available from Bob's Red Mill ( http://www.bobsredmill.com ). A small amount of any of those should increase the fiber content quite a bit. Although bread made with high-percentage whole grains tends to be high in fiber in any case.

 

sPh