The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Malted Wheat Barley?

photojess's picture
photojess

Malted Wheat Barley?

never even heard of it, much less know what or where to get it from.  It's an ingredient in the Ab in 5 book.

dghdctr's picture
dghdctr

Does it say you can use either malted wheat or malted barley?  Never heard of any hybrid.


--Dan DiMuzio

LindyD's picture
LindyD

The authors of AB in five do list the errors in the book at their website.


Photojess, if the recipe you are using is at page 91 of your book, the following is the correction:



Page 91 (English Granary-Style Bread): In the 2nd paragraph of the introduction, the second sentence should finish with “… a multigrain loaf that includes malted wheat and barley malt powder.”


xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks for posting this Lindy! I don't begrudge a bread book having errors, it is just too bad that all such books don't have a page like this one. I printed it out and inserted into my copy of the book.


--Pamela

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

went through and wrote the corrections on the appropriate pages in the book in case I lost the errata sheet.  It was really nice to have that--knitting books do that all the time, too. 

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Almost everything I knitted had a flawed pattern in some respect! The last thing I tried was a Lily Chin blanket--something was seriously wrong there. I even wrote and complained and nada.


--Pamela

BvN's picture
BvN

Ah, ha - another brewers question :-) Malted grain is grain that has been sprouted - and usually dried and milled. This is done in a "malt house". Malting breaks down the big sugar molecules; starch and lignen (wood), into something more suitable for a germinating seed. This makes the grain more fermentable for brewing and baking. It also adds complexity to the flavor.


Barley malt powder can be purchased at a brewing supply store for a bit less than $5 / lb. It goes by the name of powdered malt extract. All the kinds, I have seen, are made from barley. Best of luck.

photojess's picture
photojess

I didn't have the book in front of me, so I should have written malted wheat flakes.  I'm not sure why I wrote Barley instead.


I thought I made all of the corrections in my book too, like as listed above, but I didn't change the non recipe ones I guess for that one page......


I am going to look for these tonight at the co-op.  The flakes that is.....

photojess's picture
photojess

but the pkg didn't say malted.....is there is difference?  I hope not too much.


It's in bulk packaging, so there is no manufacturer label on it.  I had never seen it in the section before, or had bypassed it.


Will this work?

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Hmmm.  I looked at the receipe and see it calls for a quarter cup of malt powder, but doesn't specificy whether it should be diastatic or nondiastatic.


Do you know which type you have?  

photojess's picture
photojess

I bought the wheat flakes tonight, althought it doesnt't say malted, I'm assuming it is, by the pictures online.  I don't have the malt powder either, so I still  can't make this recipe....I swear I need to check what I am doing better.....well, it wasn't a wasted trip to the co-op, as I got a bunch of stuff there, and will be back there again on Sat anyway.


I don't have any idea what they offer, and they do have a brewing section, so I think I should be able to find malt powder there.   I hope anyway.  I read online about the two types of malt powder.  I can't see where 1/4 cup would be needed of either of them, but I'll have to see what I can find.  The article I read said that non diastatic was easier to find.


I really want to make this bread.


Lindy, thanks for looking at the recipe too for me!