The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Am I the only one who has stirred their starter with a metal spoon?

Deonia's picture
Deonia

Am I the only one who has stirred their starter with a metal spoon?

I just picked up a stainless steel teaspoon and stirred my starter with it. Please tell me I don't have to throw it out. I have just gotten it to making great sourdough bread. It was made according to SourDoLady's recipe using pineapple juice and unbleached flour with spring water. And it seems I read never to use metal to store or stir it with. What will happen? and do I really have to start all over? or can this starter be salvaged? Any answers will be greatly appreciated!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Do it all the time.  No problems.


Mini

Deonia's picture
Deonia

Pamela, Jeff, ivyb, Bob, and Mini, thanks so much for your responses. You guys made my day!!!!


I had taken the time and pains to get my starter going using mostly rye flour and making it quite stiff, My first loaves didn't rise very much, probably due to my inability to wait long enough for the natural rise after retatardation overnight, but they tasted teriffic. ( I used the Deluxe Sourdough Bread recipe posted by SourdoLady, which were heavy. But the other night I caught the starter  at it's most active point and made the bread again, letting it sit for about 12 hours after the retard in the fridge and it was very light and fluffy and had more than doubled in volume before baking. I liked the soft, spongy crumb of it, but I'm pretty sure it's supposed to be a bit heavier. Anyway, my freinds and I loved it even if it wasn't quite what it is supposed to be. I'll be making it again and this time i'll take a picture to post here if I can so all of you can critique it for me. Many thanks again for assureing me that I still have a viable starter ;-) I'm gong to try to post a pic of my first attempt ever at sourdough using my new starter right now, hope it comes through. Most of the rise I did get was from oven spring.


 

Deonia's picture
Deonia

Pamela, Jeff, ivyb, Bob, and Mini, thanks so much for your responses. You guys made my day!!!!


I had taken the time and pains to get my starter going using mostly rye flour and making it quite stiff, My first loaves didn't rise very much, probably due to my inability to wait long enough for the natural rise after retardation overnight, but they tasted teriffic. ( I used the Deluxe Sourdough Bread recipe posted by SourdoLady, which were heavy. But the other night I caught the starter  at it's most active point and made the bread again, letting it sit for about 12 hours after the retard in the fridge and it was very light and fluffy and had more than doubled in volume before baking. I liked the soft, spongy crumb of it, but I'm pretty sure it's supposed to be a bit heavier. Anyway, my freinds and I loved it even if it wasn't quite what it is supposed to be. I'll be making it again and this time i'll take a picture to post here if I can so all of you can critique it for me. Many thanks again for assureing me that I still have a viable starter ;-) I'm gong to try to post a pic of my first attempt ever at sourdough using my new starter right now, hope it comes through. Most of the rise I did get was from oven spring.


 

BvN's picture
BvN

The only metal that seems to cause problems is aluminum - and even that is not a guarenteed disaster. I think that it's a pH thing. Same reason aluminum and tomatoes are not a great combo. All my ferments have long term contact with stainless. I proof in a stainless NSF pot. It works as well as ceramic and glass.

Oldcampcook's picture
Oldcampcook

I am with Mini Oven.  


I use metal spoons and/or forks to stir my starters as a matter of routine. 


When I am not using my Bosch to mix my doughs, I use one of the metal Danish (made in Poland) dough whisks I bought from Eric at www.breadtopia.com


An indispensible tool.


Bob

ivyb's picture
ivyb

I use mine all the time. Never had a problem.  My guess is that if you were to leave it in for a lengthy amount of time there "*might*' be an issue..... but, no. just go ahead and enjoy yourself!


Peace,


ivyb, ny

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I regularly use metal spoons with no noticable ill effects.


Jeff

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I always use a metal spoon and never experienced any problem.


--Pamela

BvN's picture
BvN

The only metal that seems to cause problems is aluminum - and even that is not a guarenteed disaster. I think that it's a pH thing. Same reason aluminum and tomatoes are not a great combo. All my ferments have long term contact with stainless. I proof my sponge ferment in a stainless NSF pot (over 12 hours of contact). It produces the same results as ceramic and glass vessels, but is easier for me to use.