The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Is there a way of increasing the fiber count in homemade bread?

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photojess's picture
photojess

Is there a way of increasing the fiber count in homemade bread?

I like buying Arnold's WW breads and Thomas's english muffins that are high in fiber- more than your normal "whole grain" products that you can buy.  Does anyone know how they add the extra fiber in their bread products, to make them even healthier,


Is there a way to assess a recipe for the nutrient data, to find the fiber content?  I'd specifically like to know how the fiber can be increased at home though.


Thanks a bunch!

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

You could try using Hi-Maize resistant starch. It's often listed as modified starch in ingredients lists. Available through Amazon or through King Arthur Flour. I've considered it myself, but I want to get my bread making to a more skilled, experienced level before I go messing with things. I've just about got my rosemary sourdough where I want it.


Next: Pumpernickel Rye.


I don't start off easy, do I? :)

bonfire817's picture
bonfire817

But that sounds wonderful! Are you adding fresh to your dough or dried to your sponge?

PaddyL's picture
PaddyL

You can add fibre in many forms, wheat germ, oat or wheat bran, barley, rye, depending on whether you want soluble or insoluble fibre.  There are all sorts of multi-grain flours on the market, including cereals, and when you add some to your bread, simply note the percentage or amount of fibre on the package of grain, then add it into the total percentage of fibre in the rest of your ingredients.  After baking the bread, you simply divide the total amount of fibre either by the number of loaves or the number of slices you get from each loaf.  I used to do that with carbs when first diagnosed diabetic.  That was a few years ago, and I can now figure out the approximate number of carbs in every bread I bake.

bakermomof4's picture
bakermomof4

I make our sourdough sandwich bread with whole wheat flour (no yeast or white flour) and add to that wheat germ, wheat bran, oat bran seven grain cereal, and flax meal. This bread I also add potato flakes and dry milk.

RSWitwer's picture
RSWitwer

SulaBlue had a good suggestion about using Hi-maize to replace flour.  However, Hi-maize is not modified.  It is an all natural resistant starch made from corn.  It is the easiest way to increase fiber in bread and baked goods because all you do is replace some of the flour.  It has 6.5 grams of fiber per tablespoon, so it's not hard to add a reasonable quantity of fiber into your recipes.  


Hi-maize has 88 human studies showing health benefits, such as reduced glycemic (blood sugar) response, increased regularity and other measurements of colon health.  It is being called the 3rd type of dietary fiber because it is so different from other types of fiber.  What is most exciting is the studies showing metabolism benefits not offered by other fibers - increased insulin sensitivity, it shifts your body to burning fat and it actually turns on the genes in the large intestine that make hormones that help you feel like you're full - even the next day.  One study showed that people ate less food in the 24 hours after they ate a breakfast and lunch containing Hi-maize.  There is something about how natural resistant starch is fermented in the large intestine that makes your body work better.  Wheat fiber and other insoluble fibers are great for promoting regularity, but they don't generally ferment in the large intestine - so they can't deliver these metabolism benefits.


George Weston uses resistant starch that is actually chemically modified and nobody knows what it does. It's not the same at all as natural Hi-maize resistant starch.  It does not have a single published clinical study. It was criticized by the Center for Science in the Public Interest as a laboratory-made fiber with completely unknown effects.  (Nutrition Action Newsletter, July/August 2008)

photojess's picture
photojess

thanks RS for all of the technical info.  I'll be sure to read up and do some searching tonight after work.  Thanks Sula for recommending the Hi-maize.


I have wheat bran, barley, wheat germ, but wasn't sure about how much to replace at one time.  The 7 grain is probably a good idea too.


 

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

Why not use whole grain flour? Ours has plenty of fiber. I have had two of my bread customers tell me that their blood sugar has dropped since they have been eating my bread made with my stone ground whole wheat flour. I am assuming it is due to the high fiber.


www.organicwheatproducts.com


 

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Commercial whole wheat products contain a small percentage of whole wheat flour and thus need to add the fiber back.  Whole wheat flour is very bitter and most bakers cut it with white flour. 


I use Shiloh Farms 100% whole wheat sprouted flour (they also have spelt) as it is 100% of the whole grain and has all the fiber.  When grains are sprouted, the bitter taste is removed leaving the most amazing tasting flour...with high fiber!  Plus, since the grain is sprouted, it digests as a vegetable.


Not that I want to discuss this here, but I have been truly amazed at my bowel regularity since switching to this flour.


 

jannrn's picture
jannrn

Sounds WONDERFUL but where can I find this flour? Do they also have Quinoa or Amaranth???
Thanks

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I sell sprouted flours and make them to order so they are very fresh. I have hard and soft white wheats, hard and soft red wheats, spelt, rye and durum that can all be made into sprouted flours. www.organicwheatproducts.com


There is also a lot of nutritional information regarding sprouted flours on the site.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I found the simplest solution for me is to use a mill to make my own flour or buy a truly "whole" wheat flour.  There is no comparable taste to home millled wheat flour as it is simply wonderful.


I find that buying flour and then adding bran and germ etc. etc. etc. is not only a bit complicated but it felt too much like trying to out smart a natural product, that being good old whole wheat.


Jeff

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

My sentiments exactly. I don't understand why people say that whole wheat flour is bitter either. Freshly ground whole wheat flour is wonderful stuff.

qahtan's picture
qahtan

But if you don't mill your own or happen to get some that is a bit stale and started to go rancid, which happens very quickly with W/W it IS bitter. yuck


                 qahtan 

davidg618's picture
davidg618

Know a homebrewer, or is there a homebrewer's club, or a brew pub, in your area you can contact? Ask them for some spent grain. A five gallon batch of good English ale requires about eleven pounds of malted barley grain. Homebrew club members and brew pubs go through hundreds of pounds of malted grain monthly. They convert all the grain's starch to sugars (dissolved into water), collects all the sugar water (wort) he//she can and turns it into beer. What's left behind is spent grain: primarly barley husks, a little bit of uncollected sugars, and protiens--a great source of fiber, and flavor. Normally, however, it's thrown out, or fed to the pigs or cows.


I don't own it yet nor have I read it, but I understand Peter Reinhart's latest book Whole Grain Bread contains formulae containing brewer's spent grain; or Google "spent grain bread recipe" and you'll get about 26,000 references.


David G.

jannrn's picture
jannrn

If you will read the ingredients in some of the "Added Fiber" breads, you will see one of them is Methyl Cellulous....I do believe that is Sawdust.....if I wanted that, I would just serve a side of Oak with my meals!! YUKK!!! That is one of the biggest reasons I decided to start making some of my own breads!! Oh and FYI...it is considered a "Natural" ingredient because it is grown....just not natural for HUMAN digestion!!!

jannrn's picture
jannrn

I used to have an English Muffin recipe that called for about a tablespoon of white Vinegar to be added to the oil and milk when you get ready to mix it up, but I can't find that recipe anymore....does anyone have it or one close to it???? Didn't have the Nooks and Crannies but had a FAR superior taste!!! HELP!!!

bgaunce's picture
bgaunce

I don't have a recipe, but you can also look for one with buttermilk listed as an ingredient; buttermilk=milk+oil+vinegar in recipes.

photojess's picture
photojess

to be honest, I'm a nutritional label junkie, and I try to find recipes that offer nutritional values, so I don't know how a regular homemade loaf of any whole grain bread, compares nutritionally to an enriched store bought bread.


As an example, Arnold's Grains & More double fiber 100% Whole Wheat bread's fiber count is 6gms per slice and 90 calories. 


Ingredients are:


Whole wheat flour, water sugar, inulin, soy fiber, wheat gluten yeast soybean oil, cellulose fiber, polydextrose, salt molasses, wheat bran, datem (?), monoglycerides, calcium propionate, momocalcium phosphate, calcium sulfate, soy lecithin, azodicabonamide, whey nonfat milk.


I know inulin is added fiber, as it's in many other foods too, to boost fiber counts.


Jeff, I am NO where ready to start considering milling my own grains yet....still getting feet wet here.


Thanks for all of the suggestions, and flourgirl, I'm going to check out your site.  Honestly, I am not very knowledgable about what products are even out there.  I buy my KA unbleached bread flour, whole wheat, and brans from the co-op.

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

I understand not being ready now (or possibly ever) to grind your own wheat.  I would find a source of freshly ground whole wheat and buy from them.  Possibly flourgirl can help you from her site;    www.organicwheatproducts.com


As a side note I make bread with organic flour, water and salt.  That loaf you describe is something that not only would I not eat but I would be afraid to touch it.  I don't eat words that I cannot even pronounce and it really scares me when there are whole bunch of them in the same package.


Jeff

naschol's picture
naschol

You ought to check out LivingCookbook (recipe software)!  I have the extended version (DietPro) and just love it.  It calculates all the values of your recipe and does a lot of other neat stuff, too.  There is a new version of LivingCookbook out, but I am holding out until the new DietPro comes out to upgrade....


 


Nancy

rayel's picture
rayel

Calcium Sulfate is Plaster of Paris I believe. That will make that dough behave! Mmmmm, so glad I bake bread.

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Calcium sulfate is also gypsum.  It is used to adjust water quality to increase hardness.  It is naturally occuring in many water supplies.  If you have soft water, it can help to add it to your water.  Almost all natural water in the USA is hard to very hard, so chances are you've never tried to make bread with soft water.  It isn't pretty.


 


Mike

rayel's picture
rayel

I have used the organic stone ground flour from Country Creations just recently, and getting ready to bake with it again. Amazing flour, and amazing bread. Far from bitter, it is actually sweet. I know I am getting enough fiber. Laurel says, stored at  room temperature whole wheat flour will keep one month. Refrigerated two months. Check out the shelf life dates on bags of whole wheat flour  at our grocery stores, usually unrefrigerated. I have a bag that states, best by Dec 30, 09. How can it go that long and NOT get bitter?

jannrn's picture
jannrn

Hello Rayel!
I don't know that I have EVER had fresh flour! I did grind some of my own a few years ago but who knows how old the berries were?? It was good and I liked it, but don't remember it being sweet! So where can I get some of this flour??? I had NO IDEA I was eating Plaster of Paris for God's sake!! I am glad I have turned my daughter on to baking breads so she can bake it for my grandson!!! AMAZING!!! Sawdust and POP!!! No wonder we are a "bound up society!!! This stuff should turn to concrete in our bowels....sorry....I'm a Nurse!!

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I am Country Creations- www.organicwheatproducts.com


Thanks Rayel for the kind remarks about my flour. I am so glad that you like it.

naschol's picture
naschol

If the berries were stored well (not gotten wet, etc.) they should be good.  Kamut is an ancient grain that was though extinct.  An archeologist found about a cupfull in a pyramid and sent it to a farmer in Montana to be propogated.  It is now being sold all over the place.  If it's good enough to sprout after all that time...


Nancy

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Dear Jannrn,


Most helath food stores carry the Shiloh Farms Sprouted Wheat and Sprouted Spelt 100% Whole Grain Flours.  Some grocery stores too.  Anyone who carries Shiloh Brand can order it too.  Or 24/7 online at ShilohFarms.com.


To read more about this sprouted flour visit the founders web site at EssentialEating.com.  They have a lot of good info there.


I use it one for one in my bread baking with amazing results.  I used to home sprout and grind, but the Shiloh flour performs like no other.  The flavor is one thing, but the way my body feels since I switched is quite another!


 

katecollins's picture
katecollins

I have found a lot of conficting information about "fresh" flour.  I contacted Essential Eating Sprouted Foods, the first and only certified organic sprouted flour mill in the country to get some answers. They make the Shiloh Farms sprouted flours.  Their mill is one of a very few to have achieved the rating of Superior from AIB.  Their head miller is a milling engineer from Kansas State and a third generation miller.  Here is what he had to say - excuse me for turning his scientific comments into lay terms. 


Whole grains that are not sprouted contain the germ cell which is the part that goes rancid.  When grains are sprouted the germ cell is eaten by the endosperm and is now in a state that doesn't go rancid.  They have lab-tested 14 month old flour and the nutrients are exactly the same as fresh flour with no rancidity. They are finding that sprouted flour is much more stable than unsprouted flour and he stands behind a six months shelf life which he said is conservative. They only use grade A grain, which is better than what we can buy retail.


I also found it interesting that prior to converting to a sprouted flour mill their mill for the last three generation did not have any ants.  Now they have to treat for ants as they really like the sprouted flour but would not touch the upsprouted flour!  Animals are so smart.


He also said that baking with fresh flour does not result in great bread as most bakers know that flour should rest for about 2 weeks after milling for optimal baking results. He was adamant that their rinsing, milling, sifting and sprout action testing could not be duplicated at home to produce a safe, stable sprouted flour.


My experience with this flour has been amazing.  Just trying to clear up some of the "fresh" flour myths.


 

Yerffej's picture
Yerffej

"He also said that baking with fresh flour does not result in great bread as most bakers know that flour should rest for about 2 weeks after milling for optimal baking results."


This may be true in his kitchen but it is simply not true in mine.  If you have any doubts come on over and we'll grind some flour and make some bread.


Jeff

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I don't see where baking with fresh flour does not result in great bread. I grind my flour and a few mintues later use it to bake the most wonderful 100% whole grain breads. I think it depends on the quality of grains you are using.

rayel's picture
rayel

Nice post, I am getting educated. Is it safe to say that all whole wheat flour that is not sprouted flour, can be expected to graduallly go rancid? For that flour is a six month shelf life a stretch? Nice Info, thanks.

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Whole grain flour that is not sprouted contains the germ cell that is the part that goes rancid.  How fast that happens I don't know.  It will probably have to do with how it is stored.  I do know that sprouted flours do not have to be refrigerated to keep their freshness, but I'm always reading where whole grain flours should be refrigerated or even frozen if not being used.  Hope this helps.

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Hey Jeff, I was just relaying what the miller said about not needing to use flour the same day it is milled. If what you are doing is working then that is all that matters. I on the other hand was not having the success sprouting and milling my own flour that I am with their sprouted flours ;-)

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Without trying to be (too) argumentative, what's good bread?  It's like someone talking about a crust being too hard, too brown, too soft, or too pale.  By themselves, these terms are meaningless because they are so subjective.  Different people could describe the same loaf of bread with all the terms above, one saying it's too dark and another saying its too light.


 


I've seen people talking about how they can, and can not, make "good bread' usign this or that flour.  And "good bread" is a bit vague.  If you like it, it's good.  But that's a hard standard to communicate.


 


In general, I find that most of the recipes I've seen for freshly ground wheat tend to use a lot of stuff that I prefer to avoid, or at least prefer to be able to avoid.  Like sweeteners, oils, dough conditioners, and other odds and ends.  And they still wind up heavier than I like.


 


I'm not fanatical about getting a great rise, but most of the home ground flours don't deliver what I consider a good rise.


 


Many of the people who advocate using freshly ground flour have their idea of  nutrition as their sole criterion for what good bread.  And many of them make sweet bricks,  I don't care for most sweet breads, and I don't care to eat bricks.


 


Allan Scott, one of the authors of "The Bread Builders" used to say that he liked making bread with flour that was just ground, fresh from the grinder, and still wriggling with life.  A number of poeple have pointed out that freshly ground flour, left at room temperature, becomes harder to use within 24 hours, and that it needs about 2 weeks of aging after that to recover its good baking characteristics.


 


As an aside, I have a whisper mill, and have had a nutrimill and a wondermill.  I've had flour from stone or steel mills.  Overall, I feel that the micronizer mills produce inferior flours, with regards to their baking qualities.  I understand that not eveyone can affort a Retsel or whatever.  I know I can't.  However, I don't know of any industrial flour mills that use micronizer technology.  I was told about a company that tried it, and due to complaints from their customers they abandoned the technology and went back to their previous mills.


 


All that said, I've gotten some very good results with some of Peter Reinhart's recipes from his whole grain book using whole wheat flour from my Whisper Mill.  Nicely risen. pleasantly firm so I can slice it, a fresh wheaty aroma and a great wheaty taste.


 


Mike


 

ericb's picture
ericb

Mike,


I've been hoping you would weigh in on this. As I was reading through the thread a few days ago, I thought of the section on your website describing your "food philosophy."


It seems like food has become "nutritionalized" over the last century (not my own idea). As a society, we tend to focus on calories and nutrients instead of making and enjoying actual food. These days, instead of eating "real foods" that are naturally high in fiber, we look for ways to increase the amount of fiber in the food we already eat. Regardless of whether this is done by artificial or natural means, I think we sometimes miss the point. If you bake a healthy loaf of wheat bread, combine it with fruits and veggies, and make meat and dairy sides instead of a staples, then you're already ahead of the curve.


Granted, there may be medical reasons to add fiber to a diet. And, when you're working with kids who might have a "discerning" palate, you might have to slip in extra nutrients any way you can. However, as a general rule,it's not necessary to be concerned about adding fiber to an already-healthy loaf of bread.


Just my 2-cents. Happy baking!


Eric

photojess's picture
photojess

Eric.  I think I am personally trying to break away from the "typical" American diet, and am conscientiously adding more fiber for the health benefits.


Like I did say up above though.....if recipes don't give the nutritional values, then I don't know which recipe may be a healthier choice.  I would like to make educated decisions on choosing better recipes, and would stay away from plain white bread.

Mike Avery's picture
Mike Avery

Figuring out the nutritional values isn't that hard, at least for macro-nutrients such as protein, carbs, fat, and fiber (if fiber can properly be called a nutrient.)


 


Your sack of flour will tell you that in each 1/4 cup (or 30 grams), there are (lets say) 2 grams of fiber.  You use 5 cups to make a loaf of bread.  That's 20 1/4 cups, so in the loaf there are 20 * 2.25 grams of fiber.  Let's call it 45 grams.  You slice the loaf into 15 slices.  So, each slice has 3 grams of fiber.


 


If you're good with spreadsheets, you could put together a table of ingredients with their nutritional values, enter the recipe, have the spreadsheet do lookups in the table and calculate the nutrition for each batch, and even each serving, of whatever you are making,


 


Mike


 

photojess's picture
photojess

of people knowing what they are talking about, and willing to do the math for you!  I don't know how to set up spreadsheets, but I bet that would be quite useful too.  I guess I'll need to get my info off of the KA site, as I buy flours in bulk at the co-op.


 I may just have to suffice in knowing that I am baking with whole grains, without fillers and preservatives, and things we can't even pronounce in my bread.


I went vegetarian in February, so was looking to round out the higher fiber diet with increased grain fiber.  I have the fruits and veggies covered!

davidg618's picture
davidg618

There are all forms of nutritional calculators available on the web. Just Goggle keywords "recipe nutrition caclulator". Many of them are free downloads.


David G

photojess's picture
photojess

about.com by submitting a recipe.  Not sure if it can handle weights though, vs volume

photojess's picture
photojess

thanks for all of the input you guys!  This really turned into a very educational discussion!

matthewf01's picture
matthewf01

Digging up an old thread here, but this weekend after doing some baking (made a 1-2-3 sourdough bread) I made a spreadsheet to calculate the nutritional info for my homemade breads.


I'm actually tracking three attributes: calories, fat, and fiber - my girlfriend is on Weight Watchers and this way she can still have some of my bread and know exactly how many Points it is (WW Points is a formula with those three variables).


I took the nutritional info off the package for some basic flour types: AP, bread, whole wheat, and rye. In the process I did find that rye flour is slightly lower in calories per serving and higher in fiber than even whole wheat, so a large amount of it probably would do ya right!


Anyway, if anyone's interested I could post up my spreadsheet; if you want to add more flour types or other bread contents you'd have to modify it.


 


Matthew


 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

Matthew,


I, too, am a Weight Watcher and I was going to google around to see if I can find a recipe calculator to add some of my recipes. I bake every weekend and my bread is part of my plan.


I was worried I would have to give up bread when I joined but have found that WW is not about giving things up-it's about managing whatever you want to include-my bread included! Works for me!


Please post the spreadsheet! It would be nice to have the point value!

matthewf01's picture
matthewf01

Hopefully this works --- I uploaded the file to Google Documents. You can download it and open in Excel (or OpenOffice Calc if you don't have Microsoft Office... that's free).


 


https://docs.google.com/leaf?id=0B0o6I-PwLPGqOGUwZmVhNGMtZTg4Ny00OWVkLThlMDItZTRjMTQxYWIzOTA0&hl=en

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Thanks you all.  This has turned out to be a very interesting discussion starting with the fiber question.  I'm back weighing in with a real story that just happened.  An assisted living facility near where I live switched their regular flour to Shiloh Farms Essential Eating sprouted whole grain wheat flour.  Within a short time, I think about a month, most of the resisents went off their medication for constipation!  Now isn't that an endorsement for fiber in sprouted whole grain flour! 

clazar123's picture
clazar123

I can testify to the general good health properties of whole wheat sourdough bread.My systems have really benefitted as well as my general health.


As for adding fiber to bread, wheat dextrin can be used but I'm not sure of a source.May take some searching. It is used in the processed food industry to increase fiber content and I also don't know how it behaves in a dough situation. It is available in the product "Benefiber" as a bulk forming laxative but that could get quite expensive to be adding to bread. THere is about 8 gm fiber per tablespoon. The plus side of using wheat (or corn,oat or potato) dextrin vs psyllium husks is that the dextrin doesn't form a gel. Psyllium, quite literally, sucks up all the water. I'm sure if you used that in bread, you'd have to add a lot extra water or your loaf will be very dry.Psyllium has about 13 gm fiber per tablespoon.

RiverWalker's picture
RiverWalker

it sounds like that Hi-Maize stuff is the answer for those of us for whatever reason who want to do fiber-boosted bread. does anyone have a particularly good source for buying this stuff? the only places I'm finding(maybe I'm using the wrong term or something, I dunno) are King Arthur Flour, and this place:


http://store.honeyvillegrain.com/hi-maize5-in-1-fiber.aspx any other options anyone here knows of?

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

Any whole grain flour has the bran and germ in it which will have more fiber than processed flour.  Sprouting has nothing to do with the fiber content.

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Flourgirl51, you are correct, sprouting does not increase the fiber of a whole grain.  But sprouting whole grain brings forth an amazing flavor and replaces the bitter taste associated with whole grain flour.


Most whole grain products on the market contain less than 10% whole grains because of their bitter taste.  The benefit of sprouting is that it produces a flour with amazing taste so bakers can use 100% of it (100% of the fiber) instead of cutting it with other flours or adding sweeteners to mask the taste of unsprouted whole grain flour. 


Plus sprouting gives you the other added nutritional benefits and digestibility that are just as important as fiber.    


 


 

katecollins's picture
katecollins

P.S.  When a grain is sprouted the germ cell is eaten by the endosperm to produce the sprout.  I know, too much info.  But it is important because sprouted whole grain flour no longer contains the germ cell, the part of the unsprouted whole grain that begins to go rancid when milled into flour.  So sprouted flour is a much more stable food item and does not have to be ground fresh. 


We all need to update our data banks on this one!

SteveB's picture
SteveB

Actually, if I remember my biology, it's the other way around... the endosperm provides nourishment to the germ which develops into the sprout.


 


SteveB


www.breadcetera.com

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven


A kernel of grain given the right conditions of moisture content and proper sprouting temperature gets ready to germinate. The germ cell of the grain which contains fat and protein creates enzymes and secretes them into the carbohydrate cell of the grain so the germ can eat the complex carbohydrates as a simple sugar.



 I took that off the link given for essential eating.

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Sorry that is what I meant but wrote it backwards.  The germ cell of the whole grain eats the endosperm and is converted into a simple sugar.  My point was that there is no longer a germ cell to go rancid so the sprouted flour has a much longer shelf life.  Thanks for setting me straight!!

flourgirl51's picture
flourgirl51

I know- I sell sprouted flour but wanted to point out that it doesn't increase fiber as it contains the whole grain that has all of the fiber in the first place.  


www.organicwheatproducts.com


 

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Check out the 10 qustions to ask your sprouted flour producer.


It appears that all sprouted flours are not created equally.


http://www.essentialeating.com/ResourcesSprouted.asp#10%20Questions

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

the part of the food that just passes through, may I suggest adding wood chips or straw?


Ok, too much fiber?


How about vegetable & fruit peels and pulp, peanut shells and root fibers?  Everyone knows that corn skins go thru unscathed.  Whole sweet corn?  More nuts? 


I've got it ... Beans!  Yes, add cooked beans to your bread like black turtle beans.  Works well in breads!  Laurel's got a good recipe.  I think 1/2 cup of dried beans gives you 1 cup of mashed bean.  Search under:  Hello! And Help!


Mini

dannie's picture
dannie

Okay. I['m new to this and really want to know the "how-tos" in baking high fiber bread. Am I correct in assuming that I need to replace part of the flour with hi-maze flour and to use freshly sprouted flours? Do I order on line? Need a recipe. Thanks. Dannie

katecollins's picture
katecollins

Hey Dannie,


The easiest way to get high fiber bread is to use sprouted flour.  It allows you to have 100% whole grain without the bitter taste.  I buy the Shiloh Farms Essential Eating brand of sprouted flours as they are the only one that tests to assure that the flour is sprouted.  And they don't stone grind which rips apart the grain and makes dense bake goods.  Their flour is delicious and bakes great.  Check your health food store.  I buy it at Wegmans.  Or online at ShilohFarms.com.  The book, Essential Eating Sprouted Baking has a great bread recipe that is easy. If you don't have it go to thesproutedflourblog.com and ask them for it.  Hope this helps!

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

and it tastes good too!  Remember to keep under 1/3 of the flour if using a gluten recipe.  Non gluten breads could beef up the fiber in leaps and bounds! 

bread10's picture
bread10

I have never added coconut flour to my bread, but I have to say it has very nice flavour (not like the horrible desiccated coconut) I love making muffins with 100% coconut flour!

martina783's picture
martina783

 



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jerryf01's picture
jerryf01

Rice bran is a real fiber booster, Coconut flour will add a different taste to you end product, and if you use too much, it will be gritty.

Beans flour is also a real fiber booster, try it you might like it.