The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Wooden Mixing / Kneading Bowls - Type of Wood

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S. Allen's picture
S. Allen

Wooden Mixing / Kneading Bowls - Type of Wood

New to Fresh Loaf and have surfed through topics but have not found an answer to the following. If looking to buy an unfinished bowl for kneading/rising, any woods that should be avoided? Any preferences out there? Don't need sources as I already have plenty (and have the tools, equipment, and skills to make my own). My mother had a great bowl for years but it finally warped and split. Unfortunately, it was tossed before I could get ahold of it and attempt repairs.


Allen


 


 


 

Jw's picture
Jw

Allen, I don't know what to avoid. I used "linde" (Lime?) and "ahorn" (maple?) for a wooden plate for preration of dough. Pictures are below, the basic idea is that I fill the whole with different ingredients, the complete mise-en-place, in wood.  


After I finished sculpting the plate, I used hot (olive) oil to close the structure of the wood, so that the water would not soak through. If I get around it, I would like to make a bowl, which I could use as a banneton. I have a "butter-banneton" from way-back-when, which would leave nice marks in the butter. On my long-term-to-do...

Cheers,
Jw.


S. Allen's picture
S. Allen

Vielen Dank Jw.


Thanks for the info and photos. Noticed the bag of Vorarlberger KuchenMehl in your photo. Lived in Germany six years during during the 80's and into 1992. Miss the backerei and konditorei.


Allen


 

misaacka's picture
misaacka

Allen, through a strange coincidence, I actually have an answer for you:  buckeye.  While visiting my parents last week, I had a chance to watch an old film of my father (who's now 90) delivering a lecture at the local college on native plants and their uses.  He specifically mentioned that buckeye is perfect for bread trays and bowls, and he even had one on hand to show how light and strong it is (we still have this one in our family . . . hmmm, might have to liberate it on my next visit home!).  I imagine that bread bowls have been made out of many different types of wood, but at least in Middle Tennessee, buckeye is the wood of choice.


Please come back with pictures when you're finished!


Jane

hullaf's picture
hullaf

Jw, Jane, and others -- my hubbie and I found a burl on an oak tree in our woods. We felled the tree (and incidentally it was hollow so we were so glad we got it early before it rotted and termite/bug infested) and he is now working on hollowing it out. It is a very big burl so it will probably take him ages to get it ready. But, in one of my old posts, node 7169, you'll see that I've been hunting for old kneading bowls for a while but, lucky us, we're now making one. I'll put in pictures when we get farther along. 


So, my question is -- what to seal it with. I see Jw that you use olive oil. Are you not concerned that it might get stale/rancid? How about food grade mineral oil?     Anet  


Jane, we're in TN too but no buckeye in our woods. 

flournwater's picture
flournwater

In selecting a wood, I'd be looking at Walnut, Ash, or Cherry to make a large shallow bowl with at least a one inch thickness throughout.

S. Allen's picture
S. Allen

To all, thanks for the comments and ideas to date. Looks like deciduous trees and not evergreen or semi-deciduous. Wanting to make sure my bread doesn't end up smelling like a forest (or tasting of sap). Thanks again, Allen

cathal7's picture
cathal7

I'm not sure if olive oil would rancify, but I've used walnut oil to finish wooden bowls intended for food with no problems.

micki's picture
micki

I can vouch for how well mineral oil works in keeping a wooden bowl in great shape and looking beautiful.  It does not turn rancid.  Just, please, don't use the term "food grade mineral oil".  Maybe the distinction of 'paint grade' vs 'lubricant laxative'.  If you can purchase mineral oil in a food or drug store, it is food grade.  Since finding out about it a year ago, I keep a bottle in the kitchen to lubricate the kneading bowl as necessary and occasionally refurbish a layer of protection to my cast iron kettles and skillets.  (Also an extremely inexpensive tool to keep on hand.)

flournwater's picture
flournwater

I also use it on the wooden handles of my knives when they begin to get a little dry from daily use.