The Fresh Loaf

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Buckwheat Crepes (Crêpes de Blé Noir)

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xaipete's picture
xaipete

Buckwheat Crepes (Crêpes de Blé Noir)


I've been lucky enough to travel to Paris a few times. One of the new foods I experienced there was buckwheat crepes or galettes. The little bistro I ate them in was just across the bridge from Notre Dame. These crepes were served flat with an egg and ham in the middle of them. You just break the egg on top of the cooked crepe with the heat on low and cook until the white is set and the yolk is very warm. (Quail eggs would be especially delicious here.) When you bite into the crepe, the egg yolk gets absorbed by the crepe. These were fun to make although I had to add some milk to the recipe this morning to loosen it up (it really thickened overnight). I found the recipe in the LA Times. I'm going to fill some of them with creamed spinach as a side dish for tonight's dinner.


buckwheat crepes


buckwheat crepes



1 cup buckwheat flour

1 cup all-purpose flour


4 large eggs

1 cup milk

1/2 teaspoon sea salt

4 tablespoons butter, melted
Softened butter for the pan

1. In the jar of a blender, blend the flour, eggs, milk, salt and melted butter with three-fourths cup water at high speed until smooth, about 2 minutes, scraping down the sides midway with a spatula. Strain the batter through a fine-mesh sieve.

2. Cover and let rest, refrigerated, for at least an hour, or overnight.

3. Heat a crepe pan or nonstick sauté pan over medium heat until a sprinkle of water sizzles when you throw it on the pan. With a paper towel, spread butter over the pan, being sure to wipe most of it off.

4. Using a bowl or a measuring cup with a spout, pour enough batter to just cover the pan (for a crepe pan, a little less than one-fourth cup), immediately swirling the batter around until it covers the whole surface. The batter may be thicker than basic crepes once it has been resting and may need to be thinned a little; if so, add up to one-fourth cup water and stir until blended. It will have a different consistency than sweet crepes (more like honey than pancake batter) and will cook slightly differently, forming bubbles and lacier edges. Adjust the heat, if necessary, to medium-low. As with pancakes, the first one or two galettes are usually experiments.

5. When the edges of the galette begin to turn golden and move away from the pan, about 3 minutes, lift the edge nearest to you using a spatula (an offset spatula works best). Flip the galette over. Cook the second side of the galette only long enough for it to set, less than a minute. Remove from the pan and start a stack of galettes, using wax paper to layer between each galette as you cook more. Add more butter when needed with a paper towel.

Each of 24 galettes: 71 calories; 3 grams protein; 8 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 3 grams fat; 2 grams saturated fat; 41 mg. cholesterol; 65 mg. sodium.

Comments

SylviaH's picture
SylviaH

Pamela, Lovely healthy looking breakfast!  Buckwheat how healthy!  I was just reading how now they say whole milk and bacon is much healthier than they thought..bacon actually has some of the same fat as Olive Oil...I've always been a big egg fan with bacon or ham!  I especially love cheese and fruit filled crepes. 


Sylvia

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I enjoyed making the crepes. When my husband saw what I was doing, he said, "Would toast be easier?" I just glared at him and he didn't mention toast again. The buckwheat crepes were amazingly light, and they are a whole grain. I enjoyed them a lot.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

As any preschool teacher could tell you, "Use your words!" For example:


1. "I am touched by your concern for my welfare."


2. "Not paricularly. Corn flakes would be easier, though. Help yourself."


3. "If you really want toast, you are free to toast your crèpes."


I hope this helps. ;-)


David

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Words are difficult when you are trying to make crepes in the most popular corner of our kitchen! This corner has the sink on the right and the stove on the left and the coffee pot in the alcove between the two. It is where everyone wants to reside and that esp. includes our two dogs. I had a hot handled crepe pan in one hand and was trying to shu the dogs out of the way and he kept reaching over me to make coffee .... The best I could do was a glare.


--Pamela

dmsnyder's picture
dmsnyder

I get the picture. Our kitchen has such a corner also, only the details are different. Our corner may be even more hazardous in that that's where we keep our kitchen knives..


David

summerbaker's picture
summerbaker

I got a crepe pan about a year ago in our wedding registry and haven't used it for anything but pancakes and pita bread so I think that it is high time that I use it for crepes.  Your recipe may be just the one to get me off my butt since it uses buckwheat, a flour that I have recently discovered that I really like.  Thanks.


Summer

MelaniePalmero's picture
MelaniePalmero

Hi xaipete! Crepes in Paris are so yummy! Here's my favorite recipe of it.