The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Korean Rolls

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Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Korean Rolls

I can't think of a better place for hard to find info.  Years ago there was a Korean Bakery that made the best rolls I think I have ever tasted.  They were football shaped with an indention on top that was filled with about a tablespoon of butter, scallions and salt that had been simmered until tender and simply placed in a puddle on top.  I have searched the net for years and haven't found anything that even sounds close.  Any help would be appreciated.  There might be a time when I don't have to ask so many questions, but I don't see that happening anytime soon.


Carol

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

(Sure you weren't eating Bialys?)


Mini

xaipete's picture
xaipete

I was recently introduced to bialys and that was my though exactly when I saw the request. But bialys aren't football shaped, so I didn't suggest them.


--Pamela

Syd's picture
Syd

You mean something like these?  They are also made here in Taiwan.  Here is another version.  And another.  Two of those links have recipes.  The third doesn't.

Mini Oven's picture
Mini Oven

Especially the second one with braids and music.  Nice touch. 

Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Syd,


You are amazing, the first and last photos are the ones, I almost took a bite out of my laptop.  I've been looking for this recipe for over 20 years.  Could I impose on you just a bit further and ask if you could translate for me?  You would officially be my hero.  I was beginning to think that bye the time I found the recipe, I would be too old to make them. 


Carol

Nim's picture
Nim

syd


Can you translate the recipes for us? Those look yummy; I want to make, really, eat some!

Syd's picture
Syd

I'll translate this recipe for you as I have made at least one of the breads on her blog and her instructions are nice and clear.  Also, at a glance, it appears to be the better of the two recipes.  You might want to refer to the pics in this link  to get an idea of the process.


 


Ingredients:


A.


White bread flour 50g


Water 250g


(Flour in Taiwan is classified in terms of its gluten content: high, medium and low.  You can read bread flour, all purpose and cake flour.  This recipe uses bread flour and cake flour.  Bread flour typically has a protein content of 11.6% and cake 7.1%)


B.


Bread flour 750g


Cake flour 200g


Instant yeast 10g


The next ingredient is a type of enzyme.  You can check out the break down here.  There is enough English for you to work out the ingredients.  She says that if you can't buy it you can leave it out. She says in a side note at the bottom that it is a natural enzyme that helps the yeast ferment better, gives a greater rise and will extend the bread's shelf life.


Sugar 100g


Salt 10g


Milk 375g +/- 5g


Whole egg 100g


C.


Butter 100g


Method:


Mix ingredients A until smooth.  Heat  on stove until a temp of 65 degrees CENTIGRADE.  Cover and allow to cool.  When cooled (presumably to room temp) you can refrigerate until needed. (She insists you use a thermometer to guage the temp and goes as far to say that if you don't have one buy one or try a different method).  Cover tightly otherwise a skin will form on top of the paste.


Add A to B and knead until smooth, glossy and elastic.  Now add C.  Work in the butter and knead until the dough can pass the window pane test.  A piece of dough stretched between your fingers should be gossamer thin and transparent.  Don't skimp on this step.


Cover dough (in bowl I suppose) with 3 layers of plastic bags.  With each layer you should try, as far as possible, to expel all the air and seal tightly.  Refrigerate for 12 - 70 hours.  Use within 3 days.


Remove from fridge. Allow to come to room temp.  Divide into 30 x 30g pieces.  Shape into balls.  Arrange on baking tray.  Cover and leave to rise.  Allow to rise untill 1.8 times their original size i.e. not quite doubled. Brush with butter.  Cut a cross on top.


Next make the scallion topping.  Chopped scallions.  Salt to taste.  A little sugar.  Beaten egg,  (She doesn't give quantities here so use your own judgement).  Mix together and fill the little cross on the top of each roll.


Bake at 190 degrees C for 15 mins.


 


 


 

Cooking202's picture
Cooking202

Syd,


YOU ARE NOW OFFICIALLY MY HERO!  I can hardly wait to bite into one of those lovely morsels.


Carol


 

Syd's picture
Syd

My pleasure. :)

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Syd, can you translate the name of the recipe for us? Thanks.


--Pamela

Syd's picture
Syd


Syd, can you translate the name of the recipe for us? Thanks.



 


The name translates to "Scallion flower breads"  but in this case "Scallion flower rolls"  would be better. :)

xaipete's picture
xaipete

Thanks for translating. They look very interesting.


--Pamela

althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

And the presentation of it...  I wonder if I can make them into sourdough...  What's that white bun that coated with something like shredded coconut?


althetrainer's picture
althetrainer

Oh thank you so much!  Just noticed baking temperature was in celsius so it will be about 375F for us.  Do you know how to make the white buns in the other link?  They look lovely too! 


Syd's picture
Syd


Do you know how to make the white buns in the other link?  They look lovely too!



Sorry, not sure which ones you are referring to. :(

Syd's picture
Syd

Okay had a look again and now I know which ones you mean.  Those are sweet rolls.  They are filled with a paste made from flour, sugar, butter, milk powder and maybe egg - I am not sure.  She doesn't give a recipe.