The Fresh Loaf

News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

Bread comes out raw

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willowtyler's picture
willowtyler

Bread comes out raw

I tried a new Ciabatta recipe today from Barry Harmons website. http://www.artisanbreadbaking.com/breads/ciabatta/ciabatta.htm    It turned out beautiful. Only problems was when I cut it open. The dough didn't cook. It was full of air holes and look like it would have been great. except it was gummy gummy. I threw it back in the oven for another 20 minutes, still it didn't cook. So that made a total of 50 minutes.


I used Sam's Club Bread Flour for the Poolish and Sam's AP for the rest of the recipe. Then I added 1TB of Wheat Gluten what I thought would bump up the AP to a Bread Flour. Was this where I strayed.


Help


 

fancypantalons's picture
fancypantalons

Silly question, but... you did let the bread cool before cutting into it, right?

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

I calculated 70%--much like Artisan Bread in Five doughs. I agree with all of the above--these breads MUST cool before slicing and you must check the temperature to know if they are really done-I aim for about 205°.

I have a less expensive instant-read analog thermometer (about $6) but it's been invaluable to make sure the breads are done.

Before I learned to check internal temps there were gummy patches like you describe in all my AB in 5 breads.

dlt123's picture
dlt123

You need to get a digital thermometer and check your bread temperature before taking it out.  I have had excellent results since I bought mine...


I take my bread out when it's inner temperature is around 199F -203F.  By using a thermometer, you can make sure your bread isn't under or over done.


Dennis
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Belief has no affect on reality.
My Website: http://www.roadtobetterliving.com

Patf's picture
Patf

The old fashioned way to tell if a loaf is cooked is to tap the bottom of the loaf and listen for the sound produced. If there's a dull thud it probably needs a little more time. A sharp tapping sound suggests it's cooked through.


Not very scientific!


 

willowtyler's picture
willowtyler

I did leave cool for 15 min's. But since it said to bake for 30 mins. I did an extra 20 I just figured something was wrong maybe with the flour. or ME :) So I will give it another go.  I bake a challah not long ago and ran into same problem. It burnt black on the bottom. Still was not cooked through. I had a digital thermometer while it cooked. Never did reach temp.


So back to the Kitchen

jacobsbrook's picture
jacobsbrook

Have you checked the actual temp of your oven?  If it is ok.   The bread may still have been too warm inside when you cut into it.  We never cut anything without making sure it is completely cooled through (takes often hours)  and  allowing everything to "set up".  I have never done this bread, but know others have always taken longer to cool.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

It sounds like you had a probe thermometer in the bread as it baked.


Do you have an oven thermometer and do you preheat your oven?


BTW, 15 minutes is not a sufficient cooling period.  The bread should be cooled on a wire rack for at least an hour, or as long as it takes for it to be completely cool.  If you want to eat warm bread, you can always reheat it.

willowtyler's picture
willowtyler

I usually preheat for 45 mins to one hour. I didn't relaize though that so much cooling was required. It has been along while since I did check the temp of the actually oven. So I will do that and let it cool. Next time around.

SulaBlue's picture
SulaBlue

Definitely check the actual temperature of your oven. If your oven is running hot your bread will brown, or even burn, on the outside before it is done on the inside. I was having problems with parchment paper burning despite being below it's max safe temp, baking setting off my fire alarm, etc. I found out my oven is running 75 degrees F hotter than the dial says! Now that I know to set my oven lower things are coming out MUCH closer to the actual recommended time.

Janknitz's picture
Janknitz

It seems strange but I have found that these breads will pass the "thump test" but still be kind of gummy inside.

The thermometer is the only way I've found to be certain that a 70% or more hydration loaf is done. It's easy enough to do, and really makes a difference.

LindyD's picture
LindyD

I think an oven thermometer is critical, since it will tell you the truth about what's going on inside that oven.


I've often wondered why they aren't built right into the oven.  Maybe they are, in the most costly models.


Anyway, Willowtyler, if you have an oven thermometer, keep it in your oven so you can make sure your oven isn't the source of your bread problems.

deblacksmith's picture
deblacksmith

Because they are not very expensive, I suggest that you buy 2 oven thermometers at Wal-mart or a similar store.  When you go to buy these "cheap" thermometers look at all of them and see what they are reading in the store.  Buy 2 that read the same as "most".  Then put both in your oven and run the oven.  If they both read the same, then you have a spare.  If not, take the average.  This will give you a very good reading on what you oven is doing.


The above is what I teach blacksmiths to do for use of an oven for tempering of steel in heat-treating.  Works well.  Over heating in heat-treat can over temper steel -- so we are careful.  Works for bread too.


Dave,


ps: I wash my hands before making bread :)

Maverick's picture
Maverick

Was it still gummy after cooling completely to room temperature? Like mentioned above, 15 minutes is not long enough for a ciabatta to cool down. If it is not cool, it can give the appearance of not being cooked.


BTW, I agree that a thermometer is a great thing to use to make sure it is cooked.

tjkoko's picture
tjkoko

What temperature was your oven preheated to and was a baking stone used?  And the total baking time????


I myself have turned out great ciabattas using 70% hydration.

willowtyler's picture
willowtyler

Baking time was suppose to be 30 mins at 460. I also do us a baking stone.

tjkoko's picture
tjkoko

Try preheating the stone to 500F for an hour or so.  Then slide the "shaped" dough onto the stone and bake at that temp for 35-37 minutes; you'll see and improvement in the crumb.  And, don't dispair for breadbaking requires perseverence which you probably know already.


And you may find that you'll need to adjust time and temperature to zero-in on your requirements as to crust crunchiness and crumb moistness.

willow's picture
willow

Well checked the oven Only off by 45. :)

willow's picture
willow

Well like I said my oven was off about 45degrees. I bought two new oven temp things. Both said 45 or so off when I would try and reach 450. I tried make the Quick  Rustic Ciabatta Pizza the other day. I still didn't get my oven fixed. I justed cranked it up high to make the difference up.  I never did get it to reach the 500 to bake the pizza. I had it as high as the oven would go. So needless to say I was not a very happy camper. My husband was great he just scraped the toppings off his half cooked pizza since the center was gummy. Spread it on bread. Never complained.  So, I called Sears to come and fix the stove. Now this is where I am dumb. turns out I could have adjusted the oven myself if I would have read my manually a little closer. OK alot closer. So that costed me $106. The Sears man knocked off 60. So my oven is good. So, lets make some hamburger buns. Recipe as from Recipezaar.com I copied and pasted


40 Minute Hamburger Buns


2 tablespoons active dry yeast


1 cup warm water, plus


2 tablespoons warm water


1/3 cup vegetable oil


1/4 cup sugar


1 egg


1 teaspoon salt


3-3 1/2 cups flour  Well they came out gummy and didn't turn golden brown like the recipe said, except for the bottom that was about to burn. The only thing I can come up with is maybe the flour?? I would post a picture but they don't turn out either.


I have been using Sam's AP. I hope that is it. But, what do I know!


My husband once again was great when I pulled out the store bought buns, after paying 106 for something that didn't fix my problem. By the way my oven temp things were off also by 25.


Well that was my adventure. I hope I have better luck tomorrow with his birthday cake. I think I make one that doesn't call for flour or baking!!  :)


Fran


 


 


 

LindyD's picture
LindyD

Is bleached - don't know whether it is bromated because their website doesn't show the ingredients.  


Is the country of origin listed on your bag?  

willow's picture
willow

Its is from ConAgra Omaha, NE  Contains Bleached Wheat Four, Malted Barley Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin

photojess's picture
photojess

are you both willow and willowtyler?  Just trying to follow the thread, and I pay attention to who writes what stuff, so I get to know names better   :)

willow's picture
willow

I lost all my log in the other day. Sorry to confuse everyone


 

willow's picture
willow

Well I switched flour. I pulled out my Gold Medal Best Bread Flour and tackled Jason Quick Ciabatta Bread. It came out great for my husband birthday dinner. So between the oven temp and I am hoping that Sam flour I was hitting a wall with the bread just going gumming inside.


So now I have 50# of bench flour :)


Fran